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Joe Isgro

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BUSINESS
July 22, 1993 | JAMES BATES
Isgro Obtains Judge's Story: Controversial music promoter and movie producer Joe Isgro has obtained the rights to the story of Stuart Namm, a renegade Long Island judge who once accused police of mishandling two murder cases. Isgro, who was the executive producer of "Hoffa," says he identifies with the story of the now-retired Namm because of his own experiences with the judicial system. A major payola case against Isgro was dismissed in 1990, but the case was reinstated earlier this year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former record promoter Joseph Isgro was sentenced to 50 months in federal prison Thursday for running a loan-sharking business outside a Beverly Hills shopping center. Isgro, who spent most of 1990s fending off federal payola and racketeering charges, was accused of lending money at 5% interest a week to people in financial distress and using subordinates to threaten those who fell behind in their payments. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
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BUSINESS
May 6, 1987 | W.K. KNOEDELSEDER Jr., Times Staff Writer
A year after filing a $25-million antitrust lawsuit against most of the major U.S. record companies, Los Angeles-based independent record promoter Joe Isgro has reached an out-of-court settlement with one of the firms, Capitol Industries-EMI Inc., industry sources said Tuesday. The settlement was reached last Friday, sources said, but no details have been revealed. Both Isgro and Capitol have declined comment, refusing even to confirm that a settlement has been reached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Reputed mob figure Joseph Isgro and two associates have agreed to plead guilty to federal loan-sharking and extortion charges, the U.S. attorney's office disclosed Wednesday. Isgro, 52, is accused of lending money at a weekly interest rate of 5% to people in financial distress and employing musclemen to collect the payments outside a swank Beverly Hills shopping center. In the 1980s, Isgro was the target of an unsuccessful payola and racketeering prosecution that lasted nearly a decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny extortion ring operating in the heart of Beverly Hills is tied to the biggest organized crime family in New York, government prosecutors alleged Friday. Prosecutors say Joseph Isgro, a Tarzana record executive arrested last week by federal agents, is a "soldier" for the Gambino crime family who has been running a "violent" extortion and loan-sharking operation since 1994. Citing an FBI affidavit, prosecutors said Isgro is one of 192 identifiable members of the Gambino clan.
NEWS
February 27, 1988 | AL DELUGACH and WILLIAM K. KNOEDELSEDER JR., Times Staff Writers
Announcing indictments against four people, authorities in Los Angeles acknowledged for the first time Friday that a 2-year-old federal grand jury investigation into cocaine-and-cash payola by record promoters to radio programmers has become national in scope. U.S. Atty. Robert C.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking his silence over his recent payola trial, Joseph Isgro--the nation's best-known record promoter--said he hopes the release of a federal judge's opinion criticizing government prosecutors' conduct in the case will erase any "lingering doubts" about his innocence. Isgro's remarks came after U.S. District Judge James M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny extortion ring operating in the heart of Beverly Hills is tied to the biggest organized crime family in New York, government prosecutors alleged Friday. Prosecutors say Joseph Isgro, a Tarzana record executive arrested last week by federal agents, is a "soldier" for the Gambino crime family who has been running a "violent" extortion and loan-sharking operation since 1994. Citing an FBI affidavit, prosecutors said Isgro is one of 192 identifiable members of the Gambino clan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music promoter Joseph Isgro, the target of a failed federal prosecution in a 1980s payola scandal, was arrested Saturday on loan sharking and extortion charges, the U.S. attorney's office said Monday. Isgro, 52, was taken into custody in front of Le Grand Passage shopping center in Beverly Hills, a location that he and his associates often used for confrontations with debtors in arrears, authorities said.
BUSINESS
March 26, 1996 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a humiliating defeat for the Justice Department, a Los Angeles judge Monday abruptly closed the book on the biggest payola case in history. Following two hours of intense arguments, U.S. District Judge Consuelo B. Marshall ruled that the federal government had violated the speedy-trial act and dismissed the 7-year-old case against Burbank record promoter Joseph Isgro, who was accused of payola, racketeering and more than four dozen other counts.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Payola Case Heads for Trial: After eight years and an estimated $10 million in government expenditures, the biggest payola case in history is set to go to trial May 9. There is still a possibility that the case, in which record promoter Joe Isgro was indicted in 1989 in Los Angeles on more than 50 felony counts, could be resolved in the weeks ahead with a plea arrangement. But Judge Consuelo B.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS
Record promotion--the shadowy practice of persuading radio stations to play new songs--is under siege again. The Los Angeles office of the Justice Department is preparing to prosecute the biggest payola case in history--which six years ago accused independent promotion kingpin Joseph Isgro of bribing radio programmers and racketeering. The case, which was dismissed in 1990 and reinstated two years later, is expected to reach trial before September. Last month, the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1993 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Federal prosecutors are scrambling to salvage a major payola case that was gutted by a Los Angeles judge who chastised the Justice Department for pursuing the case in an unethical manner. "This is a case where the government's misconduct was as outrageous and egregious as anything that I have seen," said U.S. District Judge James M. Ideman, a 1984 appointee of President Ronald Reagan with a reputation as a tough law and order judge.
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