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Joe Jones

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Jones, 79, a musician-turned-producer who sang the 1960 R&B hit "You Talk Too Much" and later became an independent music publisher and advocate for black artists' rights, died Sunday in a Los Angeles hospital of complications from surgery, said his son, Dwayne Jones. The New Orleans native had battled colon and prostate cancer in recent years.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
November 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
More than $14 billion in child support was left unpaid to American parents in a single year - more than 1 out of every 3 dollars that were due, the U.S. Census Bureau announced Wednesday. Millions of parents are awarded child support every year, but getting it is another story. Fewer than half of eligible parents received all of the child support they were due in 2011, according to a newly released report based on the Current Population Survey. About a quarter got none. Most parents were granted support through formal legal agreements established by the courts or other government entities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2003 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
This is a paperback reissue of an Anne Lamott novel first published in 1985 by North Point Press. For fans who missed it the first time around, "Joe Jones" is a time capsule that shows the author developing the style and themes that have won her fame for "Traveling Mercies," "Operating Instructions" and "Hard Laughter." And for readers unfamiliar with Lamott's unique blend of bohemianism and spirituality, it isn't the worst of introductions. "Joe Jones" opens somewhat misleadingly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joe Jones, 79, a musician-turned-producer who sang the 1960 R&B hit "You Talk Too Much" and later became an independent music publisher and advocate for black artists' rights, died Sunday in a Los Angeles hospital of complications from surgery, said his son, Dwayne Jones. The New Orleans native had battled colon and prostate cancer in recent years.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 2004 | Michael Krikorian, Times staff writer.
On a winter night almost three years ago, joe jones dialed a popular party line where young thugs trade insults and try to pick up girls. The 13-year-old gangbanger seemed to have struck gold. A sweet-sounding teenager was coming on to him. She wanted to hook up. Tonight. So Joe did something the party line managers adamantly warn against--he gave her his address. Jones, a Blood from the Fruit Town Brims, didn't know the girl was undercover.
BOOKS
February 2, 1986 | SHELLY LOWENKOPF
JOE JONES by Anne Lamott (North Point: $15.50). The protagonist of this venturesome and admirable novel is Louise, "sexy and sweet, somewhere on the cusp between curvaceous and fat." She is the cook at a Sausalito cafe belonging to Jessie, a 79-year-old dowager and her homosexual grandson, Willie ("I thought he just had good posture"). The eponymous Joe Jones, who has lived with Louise for five years, has been banished for infidelities but aches to return.
NATIONAL
November 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
More than $14 billion in child support was left unpaid to American parents in a single year - more than 1 out of every 3 dollars that were due, the U.S. Census Bureau announced Wednesday. Millions of parents are awarded child support every year, but getting it is another story. Fewer than half of eligible parents received all of the child support they were due in 2011, according to a newly released report based on the Current Population Survey. About a quarter got none. Most parents were granted support through formal legal agreements established by the courts or other government entities.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | MARCUS ELIASON, Associated Press
Foul play is afoot in the world of championship leek-growing. Leek rustlers are raiding greenhouses for prize-winning stock, and a plot seems to have been hatched to knock out the world champion. In England's northeast corner, leek-growing is a serious pursuit, with its own world series contest, stud market and bigger and bigger prizes. Eating them hardly comes into it. Leeks, with a flavor like mild onions, make tasty soups and pies. But it's size that counts in the competition.
NEWS
September 5, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Two celebrated jazz drummers with nearly identical names, who struggled for years to keep their identities straight in the public mind, have died within five days of each other, it was learned Wednesday. Jonathan (Jo) Jones, who developed the driving but tasteful rhythms that paced the Count Basie band for years, and Joseph Rudolph (Philly Joe) Jones, the original drummer with Miles Davis' legendary quintet, are both dead.
SPORTS
February 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
Round one goes to the big brother. Yale defeated Columbia, 63-58, Friday night in an Ivy League basketball game, giving James Jones a victory over his younger brother, Joe Jones. They were the first brothers in 44 years to coach against each other in Division I basketball. Yale (7-11, 2-3) shot 54% in the second half to overcome a four-point halftime deficit. Columbia (6-12, 2-3) turned the ball over three times in the final two minutes and was called for an illegal screen with 11.
MAGAZINE
January 18, 2004
Can Joe Jones be saved ("A Life in the Balance," by Michael Krikorian, Jan. 4)? He has learned to tell everyone what they want to hear to get his way. It's a survival mode, given the sewer he lives in. If he stays, he dies both physically and mentally. He should have been put in a disciplined environment after his first brush with the law. They did him no favor by returning him to his mother, who can't seem to help or influence him. Bloods and Crips seem to be a condition, not a way of life.
MAGAZINE
January 4, 2004 | Michael Krikorian, Times staff writer.
On a winter night almost three years ago, joe jones dialed a popular party line where young thugs trade insults and try to pick up girls. The 13-year-old gangbanger seemed to have struck gold. A sweet-sounding teenager was coming on to him. She wanted to hook up. Tonight. So Joe did something the party line managers adamantly warn against--he gave her his address. Jones, a Blood from the Fruit Town Brims, didn't know the girl was undercover.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2003 | Michael Harris, Special to The Times
This is a paperback reissue of an Anne Lamott novel first published in 1985 by North Point Press. For fans who missed it the first time around, "Joe Jones" is a time capsule that shows the author developing the style and themes that have won her fame for "Traveling Mercies," "Operating Instructions" and "Hard Laughter." And for readers unfamiliar with Lamott's unique blend of bohemianism and spirituality, it isn't the worst of introductions. "Joe Jones" opens somewhat misleadingly.
NEWS
May 17, 1987 | MARCUS ELIASON, Associated Press
Foul play is afoot in the world of championship leek-growing. Leek rustlers are raiding greenhouses for prize-winning stock, and a plot seems to have been hatched to knock out the world champion. In England's northeast corner, leek-growing is a serious pursuit, with its own world series contest, stud market and bigger and bigger prizes. Eating them hardly comes into it. Leeks, with a flavor like mild onions, make tasty soups and pies. But it's size that counts in the competition.
MAGAZINE
January 18, 2004
Can Joe Jones be saved ("A Life in the Balance," by Michael Krikorian, Jan. 4)? He has learned to tell everyone what they want to hear to get his way. It's a survival mode, given the sewer he lives in. If he stays, he dies both physically and mentally. He should have been put in a disciplined environment after his first brush with the law. They did him no favor by returning him to his mother, who can't seem to help or influence him. Bloods and Crips seem to be a condition, not a way of life.
SPORTS
February 7, 2004 | From Associated Press
Round one goes to the big brother. Yale defeated Columbia, 63-58, Friday night in an Ivy League basketball game, giving James Jones a victory over his younger brother, Joe Jones. They were the first brothers in 44 years to coach against each other in Division I basketball. Yale (7-11, 2-3) shot 54% in the second half to overcome a four-point halftime deficit. Columbia (6-12, 2-3) turned the ball over three times in the final two minutes and was called for an illegal screen with 11.
BOOKS
February 2, 1986 | SHELLY LOWENKOPF
JOE JONES by Anne Lamott (North Point: $15.50). The protagonist of this venturesome and admirable novel is Louise, "sexy and sweet, somewhere on the cusp between curvaceous and fat." She is the cook at a Sausalito cafe belonging to Jessie, a 79-year-old dowager and her homosexual grandson, Willie ("I thought he just had good posture"). The eponymous Joe Jones, who has lived with Louise for five years, has been banished for infidelities but aches to return.
NEWS
September 5, 1985 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Two celebrated jazz drummers with nearly identical names, who struggled for years to keep their identities straight in the public mind, have died within five days of each other, it was learned Wednesday. Jonathan (Jo) Jones, who developed the driving but tasteful rhythms that paced the Count Basie band for years, and Joseph Rudolph (Philly Joe) Jones, the original drummer with Miles Davis' legendary quintet, are both dead.
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