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Joe Kane

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BOOKS
June 17, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
A lively chronicle of the first expedition to follow the entire 4,200-mile course of the Amazon by water, from the barren highlands of southern Peru to the oppressively lush jungles of Brazil. Joe Kane and his fellow explorers had to contend with impassable rapids, "Shining Path" guerrillas, cocaine traffickers and plagues of insects. What sets this book apart from conventional travelogues is the insightful reporting of the psychological tensions that ultimately split the expedition.
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NEWS
August 28, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Admittedly, Joe Kane was no expert on the mysterious Amazon or the characteristics of its source tributary, the Apurimac. But there was no mistaking what the river had in mind when it bumped him from the raft. It was sucking him into the brutal and deadly Acomamba Abyss. And he could not struggle out. "In a moment of surprising peace and clarity, I understood that I was drowning," he recalled. "I grew angry. Then I quit. I knew that it was my time to die." How did this happen?
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the disintegration of communism, it's getting hard to mouth the phrase "cultural imperialism" without an extended apology. Not for the reasons you might expect, though: Radical critiques of Western industrialism have been largely discredited in recent decades, but that doesn't mean market-economy culture is any less a steamroller.
NEWS
December 21, 1995 | CHRIS GOODRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With the disintegration of communism, it's getting hard to mouth the phrase "cultural imperialism" without an extended apology. Not for the reasons you might expect, though: Radical critiques of Western industrialism have been largely discredited in recent decades, but that doesn't mean market-economy culture is any less a steamroller.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Author Joe Kane has faced numerous dangers in the Amazon Basin, but twice he was sure he was dying. Once was in 1985 in the Acobamba Abyss, a stretch of fearsome white water not far from the river's source in Peru, where he was pitched from the raft during a particularly violent rapid and trapped underwater by the current. "I had taken some bad swims before, but this was different," Kane wrote later. "In a moment of surprising peace and clarity I understood that I was drowning. I grew angry.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1992 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's called "Little Shop of Horrors" (my italics). It started small, and became a success off-Broadway, not on. Its first appearance in Los Angeles was at the 499-seat Westwood Playhouse. How would it fly at the 3,054-seat Terrace Theater, where the Long Beach Civic Light Opera operates? At least from my well-placed seat, this bright and bouncy musical spoof about a cunning man-eating plant, who threatens American complacency in the Kennedy era, fares very well.
BOOKS
June 16, 1996 | CHRIS GOODRICH
AMAZON STRANGER A Rainforest Chief Battles Big Oil by Mike Tidwell (Lyons & Burford: $22.95; 216 pp.). Years from now some researcher's jaw will drop upon noticing the enormous number of books on the Amazon rain forest published during the 1990s.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2009
The recession appears to be over, but this holiday season it's still tough to find a household not feeling its effects. In that spirit, here are some bargain gift suggestions for the techies on your list. Gift cards -- The perennial cop-out choice, but still much appreciated. A couple of suggested online vendors: Amazon.com ( www.amazon.com) for all manner of gadgets, and iTunes ( www.apple.com) for music, movies and iPhone apps. TV calibration -- Even if your digital television is brand-new, it could probably be helped by a calibration to optimize the image quality.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Author Joe Kane has faced numerous dangers in the Amazon Basin, but twice he was sure he was dying. Once was in 1985 in the Acobamba Abyss, a stretch of fearsome white water not far from the river's source in Peru, where he was pitched from the raft during a particularly violent rapid and trapped underwater by the current. "I had taken some bad swims before, but this was different," Kane wrote later. "In a moment of surprising peace and clarity I understood that I was drowning. I grew angry.
BOOKS
June 17, 1990 | CHARLES SOLOMON
A lively chronicle of the first expedition to follow the entire 4,200-mile course of the Amazon by water, from the barren highlands of southern Peru to the oppressively lush jungles of Brazil. Joe Kane and his fellow explorers had to contend with impassable rapids, "Shining Path" guerrillas, cocaine traffickers and plagues of insects. What sets this book apart from conventional travelogues is the insightful reporting of the psychological tensions that ultimately split the expedition.
NEWS
August 28, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Admittedly, Joe Kane was no expert on the mysterious Amazon or the characteristics of its source tributary, the Apurimac. But there was no mistaking what the river had in mind when it bumped him from the raft. It was sucking him into the brutal and deadly Acomamba Abyss. And he could not struggle out. "In a moment of surprising peace and clarity, I understood that I was drowning," he recalled. "I grew angry. Then I quit. I knew that it was my time to die." How did this happen?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
From their hoots 'n' hollers to their standing ovation, the opening night crowd at the Old Globe Theatre gave a real down-home welcome to the rockabilly revue, "Pump Boys and Dinettes." Brought to life here with an extra-shiny gas station and roadside diner set designed by Fred M. Duer, this musical amusement conceived by John Foley, Mark Hardwick, Debra Monk, Cass Morgan, John Schimmel and Jim Wann celebrates the small pleasures in life.
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