Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoe Keller
IN THE NEWS

Joe Keller

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1986
Dan Sullivan missed the point when he reviewed our production of "All My Sons," and he misses it again in "The Poetry of Set Designing" (Nov. 16). Joe Keller is hardly our "ordinary American." Most ordinary Americans do not own factories, nor do they authorize the shipping of faulty airplane parts that result in the death of 21 pilots. Secondly, the house on the stage at the LATC was not "a handsome Greek Revival house," but an Ohio Tudor modeled on houses that we grew up with in Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SAN DIEGO--At the heart of "All My Sons" is one of playwright Arthur Miller's classic self-deceiving American males: Joe Keller, owner of a prosperous machine shop who made a bundle during World War II by sidestepping scandal and personal responsibility. Keller fashions himself a realist, not like his idealistic son Chris, or his never-made-a-buck-in-her-life wife, Kate.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 2002 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SAN DIEGO--At the heart of "All My Sons" is one of playwright Arthur Miller's classic self-deceiving American males: Joe Keller, owner of a prosperous machine shop who made a bundle during World War II by sidestepping scandal and personal responsibility. Keller fashions himself a realist, not like his idealistic son Chris, or his never-made-a-buck-in-her-life wife, Kate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1986
Dan Sullivan missed the point when he reviewed our production of "All My Sons," and he misses it again in "The Poetry of Set Designing" (Nov. 16). Joe Keller is hardly our "ordinary American." Most ordinary Americans do not own factories, nor do they authorize the shipping of faulty airplane parts that result in the death of 21 pilots. Secondly, the house on the stage at the LATC was not "a handsome Greek Revival house," but an Ohio Tudor modeled on houses that we grew up with in Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
With faulty O-rings and leaky reactors in the news, Arthur Miller's "All My Sons" (1947) becomes a pertinent play all over again. Bill Bushnell's staging for the Los Angeles Theatre Center has some design flaws of its own, however. This was Miller's first successful play, written in reaction to the official optimism of the day. America was feeling good about itself in the late-1940s, having rid the world of the arch-villain, Hitler, without losing its innocence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
David Schall, whose dual passions for acting and Christianity led him to launch the Actors Co-op theater troupe in Hollywood and to run programs aimed at helping Christians succeed in the entertainment world, has died. He was 53. Officials at First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood said Schall suffered a massive heart attack in his car outside the church Friday. He was taken by ambulance to Queen of Angels Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1996 | DON SHIRLEY and * "All My Sons," Odyssey Theatre, 2055 S. Sepulveda Blvd., West L.A. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Sundays, 7 p.m. except Feb. 11 and 25, 2 p.m. $17.50-$21.50. (310) 477-2055. Running time: 2 hours, 25 minutes.
Arthur Miller's "All My Sons" is a powerhouse in Elina deSantos' staging at the Odyssey Theatre. This post-World War II tale of a small-town manufacturer who had been accused of a home-front scandal has been criticized for its melodramatics involving a long-concealed letter. But at the Odyssey, such objections wither away in the face of the play's searing emotional power and its examination of human beings' responsibilities to each other.
SPORTS
September 23, 1988 | TIM DERMODY
There was a point Thursday night when El Segundo High threatened to run Garey off the Mt. Antonio College football field. But the rout never materialized and turned into a thriller, which was finally won by the Eagles, 21-13. The El Segundo Eagles took a 14-point lead in the second quarter and drove nearly every time they touched the ball. But the Garey defense stiffened in the second half and El Segundo had to hold on for the victory.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
If anyone questions the inclusion of Arthur Miller's "All My Sons" in South Coast Repertory's American Classics series, Martin Benson's penetrating production should dispel any doubts. Benson's staging of Miller's first Broadway hit (1947) is simply stated yet intricately crafted--much like the play itself, a searing chronicle of a nuclear family's realization that the larger human family also matters.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2002 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A father raises his two sons to bask in the promise of the 20th century American dream. But the dream falls apart, accompanied by aching guilt, bitter anger, searing recriminations. Yes, we're in Arthur Miller territory. And three small L.A. theaters are exploring this particular corner of Millerland--the father-and-two-sons plays. Interact Theatre is offering a wrenching production of Miller's masterpiece, "Death of a Salesman."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1986 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
With faulty O-rings and leaky reactors in the news, Arthur Miller's "All My Sons" (1947) becomes a pertinent play all over again. Bill Bushnell's staging for the Los Angeles Theatre Center has some design flaws of its own, however. This was Miller's first successful play, written in reaction to the official optimism of the day. America was feeling good about itself in the late-1940s, having rid the world of the arch-villain, Hitler, without losing its innocence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1996 | Janice Arkatov, Janice Arkatov is a regular contributor to Calendar
Elina deSantos believes there are three things about American theater that will never go out of style: Clifford Odets, Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller. "I wanted to do a great play," explains the Santa Monica-based director, whose last stage outing--an award-winning revival of Odets' Depression-era drama "Awake and Sing!"--ran nine months at the Odyssey Theatre in 1994-95.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1997 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year certainly got off to an impressive start with several fine productions already on the boards when two strong ones--the musical "Little Shop of Horrors" and the drama "All My Sons"--opened last weekend. The plot of "All My Sons," the current Conejo Players offering, revolves around an earlier incident in the lives of the play's main characters. Joe Keller and Steve Deever were partners in a company that manufactured parts for World War II aircraft engines.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|