Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoe Kleine
IN THE NEWS

Joe Kleine

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
December 17, 1988
Joe Kleine of the Sacramento Kings was fined $1,500 and Greg Anderson of the San Antonio Spurs $1,000 by the NBA for fighting in Tuesday night's game at Sacramento.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 6, 1997 | MAL FLORENCE
John Brinson ought to try the lottery--any lottery. Brinson, 46, a retired Army officer from Goldsboro, N.C., was selected from 3 million entries in a competition to try a three-point shot during college basketball's Final Four in Indianapolis on March 29. If he makes it, he gets $1 million. Two years ago, Brinson was selected from a million entries for a putting challenge and narrowly missed a 10-footer for $1 million during the Skins Game.
Advertisement
SPORTS
April 15, 1996 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER
Joe Kleine, a backup center with the Phoenix Suns, collapsed on the court moments before Sunday afternoon's game at the Forum and momentarily lost consciousness, but seemed in good condition as he headed to Centinela Hospital to spend the night for observation, Laker team physician Dr. Steve Lombardo said. "Before we put him in the ambulance, he was fine," Lombardo said. "He was coherent and very lucid." This is the second episode for Kleine in about two weeks.
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | MARK HEISLER
Ahoy, Commodore, permission to leave the ship? Cedric Ceballos didn't turn out to be a superstar after all, merely an extended rental. He averaged 22 points his first season, nicknamed himself "Chise"--short for franchise--helped reestablish the Lakers' credibility, then went for a houseboat trip and sailed off the end of his Laker career. Friday he was returned to Phoenix, whence he came. Jerry West taketh, Jerry West returneth for a refund.
SPORTS
March 6, 1997 | MAL FLORENCE
John Brinson ought to try the lottery--any lottery. Brinson, 46, a retired Army officer from Goldsboro, N.C., was selected from 3 million entries in a competition to try a three-point shot during college basketball's Final Four in Indianapolis on March 29. If he makes it, he gets $1 million. Two years ago, Brinson was selected from a million entries for a putting challenge and narrowly missed a 10-footer for $1 million during the Skins Game.
SPORTS
December 16, 1988 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER
The Clippers and the Sacramento Kings are discussing a trade that would send disappointing center Benoit Benjamin to Northern California for Joe Kleine, Clipper sources said Thursday. Clipper General Manager Elgin Baylor, who was in Sacramento to watch the Kings play the Miami Heat, denied, however, that the trip was made with a trade in mind. Baylor, who is a good friend of Bill Russell, the Kings' general manager, said the visit had been planned for weeks.
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, he was told to go to Arizona. Destined for employment and not an in-season water skiing break at one of its lakes, Cedric Ceballos became a member of the Phoenix Suns again Friday, traded by the Lakers along with Rumeal Robinson for Robert Horry and Joe Kleine, a deal that brings to Los Angeles a better defensive player and someone who has shown the ability to accept a role. Ceballos, of course, struggled in both departments. His considerable scoring potential, 21.
SPORTS
March 4, 1989
Is this a great country, or what? Columnist Gene Collier of the Pittsburgh Press was the latest to ask that question when he started thinking about baseball salaries and politicians and whatnot. "Do you know why the .213-hitting shortstop of the Pirates who drove in 11 runs in 122 games last year does not want to be President of the United States?" Collier asked. "Because he doesn't want to take a pay cut."
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | MARK HEISLER
Ahoy, Commodore, permission to leave the ship? Cedric Ceballos didn't turn out to be a superstar after all, merely an extended rental. He averaged 22 points his first season, nicknamed himself "Chise"--short for franchise--helped reestablish the Lakers' credibility, then went for a houseboat trip and sailed off the end of his Laker career. Friday he was returned to Phoenix, whence he came. Jerry West taketh, Jerry West returneth for a refund.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1996
David Shaw has forsaken his good sense in his Op-Ed piece " 'Primary Colors': Green for Greed" (July 19). He reviles Newsweek's Joe Klein as a reporter who kept his identity a secret, conveniently forgetting that, in this instance, Klein is a novelist, not a reporter. It was OK in the beginning, Shaw writes, because Klein was entitled to fear embarrassment if his novel was no good but wrong when he moved from "simply withholding his identity to blatantly lying about it." What did Shaw expect him to do--whisper his secret to a few journalistic friends?
SPORTS
January 11, 1997 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This time, he was told to go to Arizona. Destined for employment and not an in-season water skiing break at one of its lakes, Cedric Ceballos became a member of the Phoenix Suns again Friday, traded by the Lakers along with Rumeal Robinson for Robert Horry and Joe Kleine, a deal that brings to Los Angeles a better defensive player and someone who has shown the ability to accept a role. Ceballos, of course, struggled in both departments. His considerable scoring potential, 21.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1996
David Shaw has forsaken his good sense in his Op-Ed piece " 'Primary Colors': Green for Greed" (July 19). He reviles Newsweek's Joe Klein as a reporter who kept his identity a secret, conveniently forgetting that, in this instance, Klein is a novelist, not a reporter. It was OK in the beginning, Shaw writes, because Klein was entitled to fear embarrassment if his novel was no good but wrong when he moved from "simply withholding his identity to blatantly lying about it." What did Shaw expect him to do--whisper his secret to a few journalistic friends?
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Say it isn't so, Joe. Say you didn't fib, big time, when you insisted, "For God's sake, definitely I didn't write it." Say you didn't bend the truth--on the CBS evening news, no less; your own network, no less--when you declared, "It's not me. I didn't do it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID SHAW, David Shaw writes about the media for The Times
Sir Walter Scott said it best, almost 200 years ago: "Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive!" Joe Klein, the Newsweek political columnist who admitted this week that he was the anonymous author of the best-selling political novel "Primary Colors," may have had legitimate reasons for withholding his identity when the book was published in January.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a mystery but opening a new set of questions that roiled the worlds of publishing and journalism, Joe Klein, the Newsweek political writer and CBS commentator, confessed Wednesday that he was the anonymous author of the best-selling novel "Primary Colors" and that he had publicly lied about it. "There were times when I've had to lie to protect a source, and I put this in that category," Klein said at a Manhattan news conference in which he admitted having written the book.
NEWS
July 17, 1996 | DAVID STREITFELD, WASHINGTON POST
Handwritten changes to the manuscript of the novel "Primary Colors," the wildly successful satire of the 1992 Clinton campaign by an author known only as "Anonymous," appear to match the handwriting of Newsweek columnist and CBS commentator Joe Klein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1996 | DAVID SHAW, David Shaw writes about the media for The Times
Sir Walter Scott said it best, almost 200 years ago: "Oh, what a tangled web we weave when first we practice to deceive!" Joe Klein, the Newsweek political columnist who admitted this week that he was the anonymous author of the best-selling political novel "Primary Colors," may have had legitimate reasons for withholding his identity when the book was published in January.
NEWS
July 18, 1996 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a mystery but opening a new set of questions that roiled the worlds of publishing and journalism, Joe Klein, the Newsweek political writer and CBS commentator, confessed Wednesday that he was the anonymous author of the best-selling novel "Primary Colors" and that he had publicly lied about it. "There were times when I've had to lie to protect a source, and I put this in that category," Klein said at a Manhattan news conference in which he admitted having written the book.
SPORTS
April 15, 1996 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER
Joe Kleine, a backup center with the Phoenix Suns, collapsed on the court moments before Sunday afternoon's game at the Forum and momentarily lost consciousness, but seemed in good condition as he headed to Centinela Hospital to spend the night for observation, Laker team physician Dr. Steve Lombardo said. "Before we put him in the ambulance, he was fine," Lombardo said. "He was coherent and very lucid." This is the second episode for Kleine in about two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 30, 1990 | JOE KLEIN, Joe Klein is a sergeant in the Fullerton Police Department
On June 21 (Fullerton Police Narcotics Detective Tommy) De La Rosa was fatally wounded during an undercover narcotic transaction. He left behind a beautiful wife, three precious daughters, and a group of partners who loved him as a brother. De La Rosa's death saddens me, but it also angers me because of the complacency of the American public to take a stand against narcotics in the community.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|