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Joe Martin

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REAL ESTATE
March 13, 1988
Joe Martin, president of Martin Advertising & Public Relations in Tustin, will receive the 1988 "Spirit of Life" award from the Orange County Construction Industries Alliance for the City of Hope at a black-tie dinner on Wednesday at the Irvine Hilton Hotel.
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OPINION
November 4, 2009
Re "The Nuñez lesson," Editorial, Oct. 29, and "Ethics board clears Nuñez," Oct. 28 The decision by the Fair Political Practices Commission makes clear two important things: We need a new Fair Political Practices Commission, and we need new ethics laws. Thank you for your article. Joe Martin Long Beach :: It's unfortunate that The Times didn't learn anything itself -- such as minimizing sensationalism on its pages -- from the Fair Political Practices Commission's findings that former Speaker Fabian Nunez complied fully with state law in reporting campaign contributions.
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BUSINESS
May 5, 2002
Why is the Securities and Exchange Commission worried about Cole Bartiromo ["SEC Files New Charges Against Teen," April 30]? He's simply taking advantage of the stupid and the greedy. Joe Martin Lakewood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Stockton Unified School District has decided to lay off a district athletics administrator who was suspended over a probe into his possible involvement in a high school football recruiting scandal. The district's board of trustees voted 7 to 0 to lay off Joe Martin, 52, along with four teachers after their positions were eliminated because of budget cuts, said district spokesman Rick Brewer. Martin was suspended with pay Nov. 1 in the aftermath of the scandal at Franklin High School, which was accused of illegally recruiting players from American Samoa.
REAL ESTATE
April 3, 1988
The Orange County Construction Industries Alliance for the City of Hope Medical Center announced that a March 16 dinner honoring advertising executive Joe Martin with its "Spirit of Life" award netted a record $350,000 to establish the Joe Martin Research Fellowship at the Duarte medical center. The black-tie function at the Irvine Hilton attracted 500 guests and included a $100,000 contribution from John D. Lusk, builder/developer and Alliance chairman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The Stockton Unified School District has decided to lay off a district athletics administrator who was suspended over a probe into his possible involvement in a high school football recruiting scandal. The district's board of trustees voted 7 to 0 to lay off Joe Martin, 52, along with four teachers after their positions were eliminated because of budget cuts, said district spokesman Rick Brewer. Martin was suspended with pay Nov. 1 in the aftermath of the scandal at Franklin High School, which was accused of illegally recruiting players from American Samoa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1986
Authorities Friday identified a San Diego man presumed drowned in the Sunset Cliffs area as 22-year-old Joe Martin. Martin was bodysurfing with a friend Thursday when he became tired while swimming against the ocean current. The friend sought help, but before lifeguards could reach him, Martin disappeared in the surf. A search for more than an hour failed to turn up his body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001
Re "Logs Link Payments With Radio Airplay," May 29: Let a radio station music director take a couple of concert tickets to up the rotation on a song the station is already playing and it's called payola. That's illegal. Subsequently, heads roll and some station may lose its license. Let a member of Congress take a bribe to pass a law that is often to the detriment of millions of Americans and it's called a campaign contribution. That's legal. Subsequently, eyes roll and nobody seems to care.
OPINION
February 18, 2001
What do political action committees, the California energy crisis, campaign contributions and most politicians all have in common? First, they are all legal. Second, they all flunk the sniff test. The simple little sniff test (if it smells rotten it probably is) has fallen into relative obscurity these days. It has been replaced by millions of lawyers, libraries of laws, billions of dollars and thousands of judges all working diligently to prove things that stink are actually legal.
SPORTS
November 23, 2002
The Lakers have toe-tally melted down. Four-peat? Four-get it. They have a toehold on mediocrity. They have a size-23 foot in the cellar door. With immediate postseason surgery, Shaquille would have been healed. Instead, he's a heel. Dave Drusin Studio City Oh, glory be. Shaq's return is imminent! We'll hail your "resurrection," no doubt, having forgotten your selfish decision to wait to the last possible moment to deal with your big toe (after all, the Lakers hardly pay you enough to warrant a sacrifice of a month or so of summer playtime)
BUSINESS
May 5, 2002
Why is the Securities and Exchange Commission worried about Cole Bartiromo ["SEC Files New Charges Against Teen," April 30]? He's simply taking advantage of the stupid and the greedy. Joe Martin Lakewood
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2001
Re "Logs Link Payments With Radio Airplay," May 29: Let a radio station music director take a couple of concert tickets to up the rotation on a song the station is already playing and it's called payola. That's illegal. Subsequently, heads roll and some station may lose its license. Let a member of Congress take a bribe to pass a law that is often to the detriment of millions of Americans and it's called a campaign contribution. That's legal. Subsequently, eyes roll and nobody seems to care.
OPINION
February 18, 2001
What do political action committees, the California energy crisis, campaign contributions and most politicians all have in common? First, they are all legal. Second, they all flunk the sniff test. The simple little sniff test (if it smells rotten it probably is) has fallen into relative obscurity these days. It has been replaced by millions of lawyers, libraries of laws, billions of dollars and thousands of judges all working diligently to prove things that stink are actually legal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992
In his acceptance speech at the convention, Quayle chided the liberal Democratic Congress for limiting the terms of Presidents Bush and Reagan while refusing to support term limits for themselves. Is Quayle ignorant of the fact that it was a Republican Congress, chaired by conservatives, that passed the 22nd Amendment to limit presidential terms, in a tardy slap to the late President Franklin Roosevelt? Or is lying in order to win one of those famous family values the vice president learned when he was growing up?
NEWS
April 2, 1989
The state attorney general's office is investigating the Lompoc Elks Lodge because of charges by current and former members that the lodge rejected the applications of two men because they are black. The state is attempting to determine whether the lodge violated the Unruh Civil Rights Act, in which case the practice will be ordered halted, Deputy Atty. Gen. Louis Verdugo said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1992
In his acceptance speech at the convention, Quayle chided the liberal Democratic Congress for limiting the terms of Presidents Bush and Reagan while refusing to support term limits for themselves. Is Quayle ignorant of the fact that it was a Republican Congress, chaired by conservatives, that passed the 22nd Amendment to limit presidential terms, in a tardy slap to the late President Franklin Roosevelt? Or is lying in order to win one of those famous family values the vice president learned when he was growing up?
BOOKS
August 20, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
Although the drawings are little more than doodles, Martin has developed "Mr. Boffo" into a highly entertaining comic strip. His befuddled characters remain stranded in a slightly skewed reality; they'd like to join the normal world, but they can't seem to get the moves right. Glancing at the desiccated remains in a bird cage, Mr. Boffo explains: "At first we called him 'Chirpy' . . . then it was 'Wheezy' . . . then 'Sleepy' . . . then 'Smelly' . . .
NEWS
April 2, 1989
The state attorney general's office is investigating the Lompoc Elks Lodge because of charges by current and former members that the lodge rejected the applications of two men because they are black. The state is attempting to determine whether the lodge violated the Unruh Civil Rights Act, in which case the practice will be ordered halted, Deputy Atty. Gen. Louis Verdugo said.
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