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Joe Max Moore

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SPORTS
July 16, 1992 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe-Max Moore wants to play. None of this sitting around, waiting for someone to get tired or for the coach to decide it's time. He wants to be in that soccer match. "Sitting on the bench eats away at me a little," Moore said. "But it's something I have to deal with. I guess I just have to make the best of my opportunities." True to his words, he has. Moore, a graduate of Mission Viejo High School, has been a super-sub for the U.S. Olympic soccer team.
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SPORTS
February 26, 2000 | STEPHEN WADE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Joe-Max Moore arrived two months ago at the once-proud English soccer club Everton, skeptics christened him Joe-Max Less. Stumped by the hyphen in his name, radio and TV broadcasters lopped off the "Joe" and incorrectly called him Max Moore. The former Mission Viejo High and UCLA star had his own doubts when he was assigned No. 23--a measure of his distance from the starting 11.
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SPORTS
February 27, 1989 | DONNA CARTER, Times Staff Writer
Joe-Max Moore of Mission Viejo High School is one of the best soccer players in Orange County. But Moore, a senior midfielder, would be difficult to pick out on the practice field for those who don't know him. "It's that kid over there with thick thighs corded with muscle, reminiscent of Pele, right?" No. "Well, is he that guy, the fast one?" Well, no.
SPORTS
January 29, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He doesn't have Eric Wynalda's knack for the breakaway, the explosive speed of Roy Lassiter or the size and strength of Brian McBride, so maybe Joe-Max Moore doesn't make opposing sweepers shake in their boots like some of the other scoring threats on the U.S. national soccer team. But make no mistake, Moore has ways of getting the ball in the net. He had 25 goals and 14 assists in 1989 at Mission Viejo High and led UCLA in scoring as a sophomore and junior.
SPORTS
February 26, 2000 | STEPHEN WADE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When Joe-Max Moore arrived two months ago at the once-proud English soccer club Everton, skeptics christened him Joe-Max Less. Stumped by the hyphen in his name, radio and TV broadcasters lopped off the "Joe" and incorrectly called him Max Moore. The former Mission Viejo High and UCLA star had his own doubts when he was assigned No. 23--a measure of his distance from the starting 11.
SPORTS
January 29, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER
When it came to choosing a college, Joe-Max Moore had a lot of options. Score 25 times and assist on 14 other goals during your senior year in high school and you'll find yourself in a similar situation. But the former Mission Viejo High standout, who was named The Times Orange County player of the year in 1989, realizes there are a lot of young players out there who lack his lofty credentials. He also believes they deserve every opportunity to play in college.
SPORTS
April 18, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major League Soccer has suffered the first two setbacks in its quest to sign all of the leading U.S. players by the time the proposed league opens next April. Midfielder Claudio Reyna, 21, and striker Joe-Max Moore, 24, two of the U.S. national team's most promising young players, have decided to stay with their German teams.
SPORTS
March 29, 1989 | DONNA CARTER, Times Staff Writer
Joe-Max Moore's senior season with the Mission Viejo High School soccer team reads like a Hollywood movie script, or maybe even a fairy tale. Moore, one of the smallest players on his team at 5-feet-7, 130 pounds, led the South Coast League in scoring with 25 goals and 10 assists and was named the league's player of the year. His team held the No. 1 ranking in the boys' Southern Section 3-A all season and advanced to the 3-A final.
SPORTS
November 30, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe-Max Moore has spent much of his soccer career ambushed by his own biology. At 20, he still looks like a hesitant hall monitor. He is barely tall enough to qualify for the rides at Disneyland. His frame gives the impression that Moore has made a habit of leaving the table before anyone offered seconds. He is a reminder that stature is not always defined by size but also by worth. He has persevered beyond what well-meaning others told him were physical limitations.
SPORTS
January 29, 1997 | JOHN WEYLER
When it came to choosing a college, Joe-Max Moore had a lot of options. Score 25 times and assist on 14 other goals during your senior year in high school and you'll find yourself in a similar situation. But the former Mission Viejo High standout, who was named The Times Orange County player of the year in 1989, realizes there are a lot of young players out there who lack his lofty credentials. He also believes they deserve every opportunity to play in college.
SPORTS
January 14, 1996 | Mike Penner
The ball lay just outside the penalty area, less than 19 yards from victory, and over it stood the two American strikers, Eric Wynalda and Joe-Max Moore, trying to strike a deal. "OK, it's mine," Wynalda declared, knowing exactly what a successful free kick at this juncture would mean. Probably, a 3-2 Gold Cup triumph over Trinidad and Tobago. Certainly, the third hat trick in the history of the Gold Cup.
SPORTS
April 18, 1995 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Major League Soccer has suffered the first two setbacks in its quest to sign all of the leading U.S. players by the time the proposed league opens next April. Midfielder Claudio Reyna, 21, and striker Joe-Max Moore, 24, two of the U.S. national team's most promising young players, have decided to stay with their German teams.
SPORTS
July 14, 1994 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They didn't make any "Tonight Show" or "Late Show With David Letterman" appearances. Their pictures didn't appear in Sports Illustrated or on the cover of Soccer America. They were part of the U.S. soccer team's inspiring World Cup run, but they didn't take part in it, thus many of the spoils that have been heaped upon their more famous and more scraggly haired, goateed teammates have eluded Joe-Max Moore and Mike Lapper, two Orange County natives on the team.
SPORTS
July 16, 1992 | CHRIS FOSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe-Max Moore wants to play. None of this sitting around, waiting for someone to get tired or for the coach to decide it's time. He wants to be in that soccer match. "Sitting on the bench eats away at me a little," Moore said. "But it's something I have to deal with. I guess I just have to make the best of my opportunities." True to his words, he has. Moore, a graduate of Mission Viejo High School, has been a super-sub for the U.S. Olympic soccer team.
SPORTS
November 29, 1990 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe-Max Moore, the playmaking midfielder for UCLA's soccer team, is not exactly a chatter box. Maybe Moore figures he'd rather let others stick their feet in their mouths--he'll just put his on the ball. Ask him for a bit of self-evaluation, and he evades the question for fear of sounding conceited.
SPORTS
January 14, 1996 | Mike Penner
The ball lay just outside the penalty area, less than 19 yards from victory, and over it stood the two American strikers, Eric Wynalda and Joe-Max Moore, trying to strike a deal. "OK, it's mine," Wynalda declared, knowing exactly what a successful free kick at this juncture would mean. Probably, a 3-2 Gold Cup triumph over Trinidad and Tobago. Certainly, the third hat trick in the history of the Gold Cup.
SPORTS
November 30, 1991 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe-Max Moore has spent much of his soccer career ambushed by his own biology. At 20, he still looks like a hesitant hall monitor. He is barely tall enough to qualify for the rides at Disneyland. His frame gives the impression that Moore has made a habit of leaving the table before anyone offered seconds. He is a reminder that stature is not always defined by size but also by worth. He has persevered beyond what well-meaning others told him were physical limitations.
SPORTS
November 29, 1990 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe-Max Moore, the playmaking midfielder for UCLA's soccer team, is not exactly a chatter box. Maybe Moore figures he'd rather let others stick their feet in their mouths--he'll just put his on the ball. Ask him for a bit of self-evaluation, and he evades the question for fear of sounding conceited.
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