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Joe Mcilvaine

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SPORTS
April 4, 1991 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is in charge of his own baseball team now. The official title next to his name reads "executive vice-president baseball operations & general manager." He makes his own trades, negotiates contracts, decides who to hire and who to let go. He watches the waiver wire and keeps up with the free-agent market. But Joe McIlvaine's favorite part of baseball hasn't changed. It still is scouting. Ask him about it and he speaks with enthusiasm in his voice and a smile on his face.
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SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | ROSS NEWHAN
Joe McIlvaine was fired as general manager of the New York Mets in the middle of a season in which his preaching of patience during a multiyear rebuilding process was bearing fruit. The firing came at a time when the clock is ticking on the July 31 trade deadline with McIlvaine in pursuit of pitching support for his team's surprising wild-card pursuit.
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SPORTS
February 24, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Letters of protest continue to filter into hisoffice. Whispers of contempt swirl behind his back. Former employees, players and agents take their finest jabs. The weather certainly is more pleasant, the streets might be cleaner and there's not a subway in sight, but even after fleeing the streets of New York for the beaches of Southern California, Joe McIlvaine still is waiting to discover paradise.
SPORTS
July 17, 1997 | Times Wire Services
Joe McIlvaine was fired Wednesday as general manager of the surprising New York Mets, the apparent victim of a personality conflict with co-owner Fred Wilpon and Manager Bobby Valentine. Steve Phillips, 34, was promoted from assistant general manager to fill the McIlvaine vacancy and will be given a contract through the 2000 season. McIlvaine, who was offered another job in the organization, was the Mets' scouting director when they picked Phillips in the 1981 June draft.
SPORTS
July 9, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON
Joe McIlvaine, former general manager of the San Diego Padres, held his first news conference Thursday at Shea Stadium as the new general manager of the New York Mets. It marks McIvaine's return the the Mets, where he worked from 1980-90 in several capacities, including vice president of both baseball operations and player personnel.
SPORTS
July 17, 1997 | Times Wire Services
Joe McIlvaine was fired Wednesday as general manager of the surprising New York Mets, the apparent victim of a personality conflict with co-owner Fred Wilpon and Manager Bobby Valentine. Steve Phillips, 34, was promoted from assistant general manager to fill the McIlvaine vacancy and will be given a contract through the 2000 season. McIlvaine, who was offered another job in the organization, was the Mets' scouting director when they picked Phillips in the 1981 June draft.
SPORTS
December 17, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Threatened with a defamation of character lawsuit, Padre General Manager Joe McIlvaine reached an out-of-court settlement with agent Scott Boras. Although the parties are prohibited from discussing the settlement, it has been learned that McIlvaine vowed that he will refrain from making critical comments on Boras' character or negotiating tactics. "I'm a very reasonable guy," Boras said. "I'm only out to defend my rights. "This has little to do with my relationship with the Padres.
SPORTS
June 10, 1993 | Associated Press
The San Diego Padres replaced general manager Joe McIlvaine on Wednesday after a long-running dispute over cutting costs and hired the Colorado Rockies' assistant general manager, Randy Smith, to take his place. Smith, 30, was the Padres' director of scouting before moving to the expansion Rockies. He will become the youngest general manager in major league history. Smith signed a five-year contract but terms were not disclosed.
SPORTS
October 1, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe McIlvaine will be named the Padres' vice president of baseball operations, sources within the San Diego organization said Sunday, and he will sign what is believed to be a five-year contract that will pay him an estimated $1.6 million. An announcement could be made a soon as today, one highly placed club source said. McIlvaine, who is expected to begin working for the Padres immediately, resigned Friday from the same position with the New York Mets, sources said.
SPORTS
July 9, 1993 | MARYANN HUDSON
Joe McIlvaine, former general manager of the San Diego Padres, held his first news conference Thursday at Shea Stadium as the new general manager of the New York Mets. It marks McIvaine's return the the Mets, where he worked from 1980-90 in several capacities, including vice president of both baseball operations and player personnel.
SPORTS
June 10, 1993 | Associated Press
The San Diego Padres replaced general manager Joe McIlvaine on Wednesday after a long-running dispute over cutting costs and hired the Colorado Rockies' assistant general manager, Randy Smith, to take his place. Smith, 30, was the Padres' director of scouting before moving to the expansion Rockies. He will become the youngest general manager in major league history. Smith signed a five-year contract but terms were not disclosed.
SPORTS
April 3, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ed Lynch, San Diego Padre farm director, poked his head into Joe McIlvaine's office, looking frantic. "Joe, you better get going," Lynch said, glancing at his watch to accentuate his point. "It's already after 6." "I know, I'll be there, Ed." "Joe, the party starts at 6:30, and it's a good 20-minute ride from here. You don't want to be late." "Don't worry, you go on ahead. I'll catch up with you there."
SPORTS
December 17, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Threatened with a defamation of character lawsuit, Padre General Manager Joe McIlvaine reached an out-of-court settlement with agent Scott Boras. Although the parties are prohibited from discussing the settlement, it has been learned that McIlvaine vowed that he will refrain from making critical comments on Boras' character or negotiating tactics. "I'm a very reasonable guy," Boras said. "I'm only out to defend my rights. "This has little to do with my relationship with the Padres.
SPORTS
October 5, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Two hundred dollar fine to anyone who shakes his hand," Padre Manager Jim Riggleman barked. All-Star shortstop Tony Fernandez had just slapped an infield single in Friday's doubleheader against the Atlanta Braves, and Riggleman was livid. It not only led to a run, but extended Fernandez's hitting streak to 17 games. To Riggleman, that was totally irrelevant. Ignoring the take sign, Fernandez swung on a 3-and-0 pitch. Riggleman was not going to condone this.
SPORTS
July 12, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Britain has Prince Charles and Princess Diana. New York has Donald and Ivana Trump. Hollywood has Steven Spielberg and Amy Irving. San Diego has Joe McIlvaine and Greg Riddoch. The Padres' marriage of McIlvaine and Riddoch is only one of convenience. It was doomed from the inception, and it will be terminated in a cruel, cold manner. It's only a matter of time: Riddoch will be fired as Padre manager. It could very well be within the next two weeks. It could take two months. But it will happen.
SPORTS
September 30, 1990 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe McIlvaine, New York Mets vice president/baseball operations, said Saturday night that he recently interviewed for the Padre general manager opening, but refused to elaborate. Reached at his Tuckahoe, N.Y., home, McIlvaine said in a telephone interview that he was in California a week ago to interview for the job, but declined to say whether he'd accept, if offered. "I've been out there, I've talked with them," McIlvaine said, "but that's all I can tell you.
SPORTS
July 20, 1997 | ROSS NEWHAN
Joe McIlvaine was fired as general manager of the New York Mets in the middle of a season in which his preaching of patience during a multiyear rebuilding process was bearing fruit. The firing came at a time when the clock is ticking on the July 31 trade deadline with McIlvaine in pursuit of pitching support for his team's surprising wild-card pursuit.
SPORTS
April 18, 1992
It's too early to be cocky about a trade working out for the best, but after the first 11 games of the season, Joe McIlvaine, Padre general manager, can not help being a bit smug. McIlvaine, harshly criticized for trading for Gary Sheffield three weeks ago, sits back now with a look of contentment. After all, where would the Padres be after 11 games of the season if not for the acquisition of Sheffield? "Maybe now people will realize I know what I'm doing," McIlvaine said.
SPORTS
January 22, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They've found other celebrities who can sing the national anthem better than Roseanne Barr. Sons-in-law no longer are running the front office. Club presidents have quit making obscene gestures to local fans. Tranquillity has returned to the Padres. Ever since 1990, when Barr took the stage at Jack Murphy Stadium, and virtually the entire front office was fired a few months later, there has been almost a peaceful hush in Mission Valley.
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