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NEWS
March 16, 1991 | United Press International
Thieves broke into Rep. Joe Moakley's South Boston home on Friday and took $600, jewelry and a collector's ring from baseball Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski, officials said. The Massachusetts Democrat and his wife were asleep upstairs when the suspects entered through a door, police and a congressional aide said. Moakley discovered the robbery when he heard a strange noise and went to investigate.
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NEWS
May 31, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With flags flying at half-staff and the mournful song of a solitary bagpipe, Joe Moakley came home one last time. The beloved, 15-term Democratic congressman from South Boston died Sunday in Washington, D.C. He was 74 years old and had been suffering from leukemia. A three-day memorial tribute to John Joseph Moakley--known universally in his home district as "Joe"--began Wednesday with a vigil at the parish church in his working-class, mostly Irish neighborhood.
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NEWS
May 31, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With flags flying at half-staff and the mournful song of a solitary bagpipe, Joe Moakley came home one last time. The beloved, 15-term Democratic congressman from South Boston died Sunday in Washington, D.C. He was 74 years old and had been suffering from leukemia. A three-day memorial tribute to John Joseph Moakley--known universally in his home district as "Joe"--began Wednesday with a vigil at the parish church in his working-class, mostly Irish neighborhood.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | Associated Press
Rep. Joseph Moakley (D-Mass.) remained hospitalized Saturday at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., while recovering from a high fever that struck him Wednesday. "He feels better today," Kevin Ryan, Moakley's congressional chief of staff, said. "But they're not telling us when they're going to release him." Moakley, 73, announced Feb. 12 that he has an incurable form of leukemia and will not seek reelection.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A congressman, angered by allegations by INS Commissioner Harold Ezell that recent death squad-style threats in Los Angeles may have been an "orchestrated PR campaign" by the sanctuary movement to bolster one of his bills, demanded Wednesday a formal INS inquiry into the propriety of Ezell's comments. Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.
NEWS
April 8, 2001 | Associated Press
Rep. Joseph Moakley (D-Mass.) remained hospitalized Saturday at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., while recovering from a high fever that struck him Wednesday. "He feels better today," Kevin Ryan, Moakley's congressional chief of staff, said. "But they're not telling us when they're going to release him." Moakley, 73, announced Feb. 12 that he has an incurable form of leukemia and will not seek reelection.
NEWS
October 18, 1985 | Associated Press
Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.), citing a decision of El Salvador's president to send three of his daughters and his grandchildren to the United States for their safety, urged the Administration on Thursday to stop deporting Salvadoran refugees. "The recent decision of President Jose Napoleon Duarte . . .
NEWS
June 8, 1989
Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.) was elected to replace the late Rep. Claude Pepper (D-Fla.) as chairman of the House Rules Committee. Moakley, a committee member since 1974, was the second-ranking Democrat on the panel. Moakley said he would attempt to emulate Pepper's style, saying the Florida Democrat "probably was one of the most democratic chairmen up here." Once a committee approves a piece of legislation, the measure moves to the Rules Committee, which decides if and when the bill will be debated by the full House, how it will be debated and whether amendments will be permitted.
NEWS
August 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The leaders of El Salvador's armed forces are "engaged in a conspiracy to obstruct justice" in the investigation of last year's slayings of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper and her daughter, the head of a House task force on the case said. But Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.) said that task force investigators who visited El Salvador last week also found that members of the armed forces not involved in the killings are upset that the killings may lead to a cut in U.S. military aid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1991
Your editorial on the tentative agreement between El Salvador's Cristiani government and the FMLN ("Salvador's Salvation: Has It Finally Arrived?" Sept. 27) was misleading in that it suggested that the role of the U.S. and specifically the U.S. military in El Salvador was that of trying to promote peace and prevent bloodshed. Nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, the United States has been the prime sponsor of terror in the region; we have given over $4 billion of our scarce tax dollars to the Salvadoran government in the form of military aid and other assistance over the last 10 years; the result has been over 70,000 killed (the majority, as reported in The Times, by the army and government-supported death squads)
NEWS
March 16, 1991 | United Press International
Thieves broke into Rep. Joe Moakley's South Boston home on Friday and took $600, jewelry and a collector's ring from baseball Hall of Famer Carl Yastrzemski, officials said. The Massachusetts Democrat and his wife were asleep upstairs when the suspects entered through a door, police and a congressional aide said. Moakley discovered the robbery when he heard a strange noise and went to investigate.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A congressman, angered by allegations by INS Commissioner Harold Ezell that recent death squad-style threats in Los Angeles may have been an "orchestrated PR campaign" by the sanctuary movement to bolster one of his bills, demanded Wednesday a formal INS inquiry into the propriety of Ezell's comments. Rep. Joe Moakley (D-Mass.
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
A Massachusetts congressman who has been involved in a public debate with Harold Ezell, western regional commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, formally asked national INS Commissioner Alan C. Nelson Thursday to fire Ezell. Nelson was out of the country and could not be reached for comment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1993
El Salvador, with a population of only 5 million, suffered 75,000 deaths during its decade of civil war. The equivalent in a country the size of the United States would be 3,750,000 dead, an unthinkable catastrophe. The 1992 peace agreement was brokered by the United Nations. One portion of the agreement was the establishment by the United Nations of a Truth Commission that took testimony--courageous even when it was anonymous--from 2,000 victims of and witnesses to human rights abuses.
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