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Joe Nuxhall

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Joe Nuxhall, who was the youngest baseball player in major league history and a beloved broadcaster for the Cincinnati Reds, has died. He was 79. Nuxhall died late Thursday at a hospital in Cincinnati after a bout with cancer, the Cincinnati Post reported Friday. Nuxhall's health problems had multiplied in recent years. He had surgery for prostate cancer in 1992, followed by a mild heart attack in 2001.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Joe Nuxhall, who was the youngest baseball player in major league history and a beloved broadcaster for the Cincinnati Reds, has died. He was 79. Nuxhall died late Thursday at a hospital in Cincinnati after a bout with cancer, the Cincinnati Post reported Friday. Nuxhall's health problems had multiplied in recent years. He had surgery for prostate cancer in 1992, followed by a mild heart attack in 2001.
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SPORTS
February 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former Cincinnati Red pitcher Joe Nuxhall, 63, was discharged from a hospital a week after undergoing prostate cancer surgery.
SPORTS
June 5, 1994 | JOE KAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fifty years ago, a stocky kid made history with a terrifying major league debut. Joe Nuxhall was 15 years old when he came in to pitch the final inning of a game against the St. Louis Cardinals. No one had ever played in the National or American League at such a young age; no one has since. No wonder his knees wobbled. Can you imagine being 15 years old and pitching to Stan Musial? * It was June 10, 1944. Four days after D-Day. Newspaper headlines scream that U.S.
SPORTS
May 4, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Cincinnati broadcasters Marty Brennaman and Joe Nuxhall, saying they were sorry and embarrassed, apologized Tuesday for on-the-air criticisms of National League umpire Dave Pallone during his run-in with Reds Manager Pete Rose. Brennaman and Nuxhall met for nearly two hours with Commissioner Peter Ueberroth and NL President Bart Giamatti. There was no announcement whether punishment would be taken against the broadcasters.
SPORTS
June 5, 1994 | JOE KAY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fifty years ago, a stocky kid made history with a terrifying major league debut. Joe Nuxhall was 15 years old when he came in to pitch the final inning of a game against the St. Louis Cardinals. No one had ever played in the National or American League at such a young age; no one has since. No wonder his knees wobbled. Can you imagine being 15 years old and pitching to Stan Musial? * It was June 10, 1944. Four days after D-Day. Newspaper headlines scream that U.S.
SPORTS
May 3, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Bart Giamatti of the National League suspended Cincinnati Reds Manager Pete Rose Monday for 30 days--the longest ban of a manager in 41 years--for shoving umpire Dave Pallone during Saturday night's game against the New York Mets. In a statement released in New York, Giamatti called the incident, in which Rose twice shoved Pallone while arguing a call at first base, an "extremely ugly situation" and "one of the worst in baseball's recent memory."
SPORTS
June 3, 1998 | STEVE HENSON
Suns Manager Jim Derrington made his debut with the Chicago White Sox in 1956 at age 16, making him the youngest pitcher to start a major-league game. Only Joe Nuxhall of the Cincinnati Reds, who pitched in one game in 1944 at the age of 15, was a younger major-league player. Derrington, 58, also has the distinction of being the youngest major leaguer to hit safely. Derrington made the one appearance in 1956, allowing nine hits and five runs in six innings.
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | Associated Press
Cincinnati Reds Manager Pete Rose was suspended for 30 days by National League President Bart Giamatti today for his run-in Saturday night with umpire Dave Pallone. Giamatti also announced that Rose was being fined "a substantial amount" for the incident in which he pushed Pallone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1988
National League President Bart Giamatti decribes last Saturday night's incident at Riverfront Stadium in Cincinnati as "one of the worst in baseball's recent memory." It was that, and not just because Reds Manager Pete Rose twice shoved an umpire--an infraction that earned him a 30-day suspension and a reported $10,000 fine.
SPORTS
February 26, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Former Cincinnati Red pitcher Joe Nuxhall, 63, was discharged from a hospital a week after undergoing prostate cancer surgery.
SPORTS
May 4, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
Cincinnati broadcasters Marty Brennaman and Joe Nuxhall, saying they were sorry and embarrassed, apologized Tuesday for on-the-air criticisms of National League umpire Dave Pallone during his run-in with Reds Manager Pete Rose. Brennaman and Nuxhall met for nearly two hours with Commissioner Peter Ueberroth and NL President Bart Giamatti. There was no announcement whether punishment would be taken against the broadcasters.
SPORTS
May 3, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
President Bart Giamatti of the National League suspended Cincinnati Reds Manager Pete Rose Monday for 30 days--the longest ban of a manager in 41 years--for shoving umpire Dave Pallone during Saturday night's game against the New York Mets. In a statement released in New York, Giamatti called the incident, in which Rose twice shoved Pallone while arguing a call at first base, an "extremely ugly situation" and "one of the worst in baseball's recent memory."
SPORTS
August 13, 2000
15: When Joe Nuxhall pitched for the Cincinnati Reds on June 10, 1944, he was, and still is, the youngest player ever to play in a major league game. Nuxhall was 15 years, 10 months and 11 days old. Nuxhall pitched in only that game that year and he didn't do too well. He didn't get anyone out, allowing two hits and five walks at a time when major league teams were forced to find replacements for the many players who were off fighting in World War II.
SPORTS
July 14, 1997 | Times Wire Services
The St. Louis Cardinals put outfielder Willie McGee on the 15-day disabled list and recalled outfielder-first baseman Phil Plantier from triple-A Louisville of the American Assn. Plantier had two hits, including a solo home run during an 11-5 victory over the Cubs at Chicago. McGee, who plays all three outfield positions, has been bothered because of a left side strain. McGee, 38, was batting .299 with three home runs and 21 RBI in 68 games.
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