Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoe Orton
IN THE NEWS

Joe Orton

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The new season at the Mark Taper Forum will feature this year's Tony-winning play as well as world-premieres by Daniel Beaty and Jordan Harrison and the postponed revival of Joe Orton's "What the Butler Saw," the Center Theatre Group announced Tuesday. The season, which starts in February, will offer six productions, up from five in the current season. The 2014 season opens with Christopher Durang's "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike" (Feb. 9-March 9), the 2013 Tony-winner for best play.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
More of Sarah Horn's dreams are coming true - and fast. The Riverside voice teacher told Culture Monster  on Tuesday that she not-no-secretly yearned to reappear at the Hollywood Bowl as an invited performer. Just days earlier Horn shot to Internet stardom after an impromptu duet of the "Wicked" tune "For Good" onstage at the Bowl with her idol, Kristin Chenoweth, went viral on You Tube with more than 2 million hits. Horn moves fast: Done. TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts The Hollywood Bowl announced Wednesday that it has asked Horn back to its stage -- this time to guest judge its Abba-Cappella competition the evening of Sept.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
After a brief failed run a year before, "Loot" became a London hit in 1966, when Joe Orton was 33 and mastering his art, rivaling Oscar Wilde as the funniest and most dangerous author of epigrams in the English language. One year later, Orton's lover, Kenneth Halliwell, beat his brains in with a hammer. As the critic John Lahr wrote of Orton, "He expected to die young, but he built his plays to last."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
The new season at the Mark Taper Forum will feature this year's Tony-winning play as well as world-premieres by Daniel Beaty and Jordan Harrison and the postponed revival of Joe Orton's "What the Butler Saw," the Center Theatre Group announced Tuesday. The season, which starts in February, will offer six productions, up from five in the current season. The 2014 season opens with Christopher Durang's "Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike" (Feb. 9-March 9), the 2013 Tony-winner for best play.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1987 | RAY LOYND
The times have caught up with playwright Joe Orton. Neglected if not forgotten since his lurid murder 20 years ago, Orton has been rediscovered with a flourish. His movie biography, "Prick Up Your Ears," has just been released. His diaries have just been published. And now we have a biographical stage play, "Nasty Little Secrets." Lanie Robertson's drama concluded its premiere run here Sunday at the 178-year-old Walnut Street Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1993 | M.E. WARREN
Playwright Joe Orton lived briefly in the hot spotlight of theatrical success. Between 1963, when the BBC optioned his first play, "The Ruffian on the Stair," and 1966, when "Loot" was heralded as the best play of the year by both the Evening Standard and Plays and Players, a theater review magazine, Orton moved quickly from the ranks of obscurity to center stage, where he was applauded as the most original comic voice of his time.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1991 | RAY LOYND
Fans of Joe Orton may be regaled by the Ortonesque farce, "Black and Blue," a kind of poor man's "Prick Up Your Ears" at the Tamarind Theatre. The action menacingly is set in the Orton flat at 25 Noel Road in London on Aug. 9, 1967--the day the playwright was bludgeoned to death by his lover, Kenneth Halliwell. But this fan was not regaled. The frenetic pace is tiring, the corpse in the bed, the nurse and the inspector grow wearisome and repetitive.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
More of Sarah Horn's dreams are coming true - and fast. The Riverside voice teacher told Culture Monster  on Tuesday that she not-no-secretly yearned to reappear at the Hollywood Bowl as an invited performer. Just days earlier Horn shot to Internet stardom after an impromptu duet of the "Wicked" tune "For Good" onstage at the Bowl with her idol, Kristin Chenoweth, went viral on You Tube with more than 2 million hits. Horn moves fast: Done. TIMELINE: Summer's must see concerts The Hollywood Bowl announced Wednesday that it has asked Horn back to its stage -- this time to guest judge its Abba-Cappella competition the evening of Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theatre Critic
There was a young nun from Burnt Norton Who was mad for the plays of Joe Orton. When one came to town, She would kick off her gown, And. . . . No need to go on. The point is that the third play in the Joe Orton cycle, the one that we didn't get at the Mark Taper Forum this summer, has opened, very satisfactorily, at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. "What the Butler Saw" was the script that Orton had just finished when he died in 1967.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 1987 | ROBERT KOEHLER
According to Joe Orton, reality goes something like this: The innocent get nabbed, and the guilty get away with murder. Or, in the case of "Loot," Orton's second play, they get away with bank robbery. Whether they get the cash is almost beside the point in this venal, duplicitous world. The venality and duplicity are oozing out of the woodwork at the Tiffany Theatre, where director Dennis Erdman's actors have found what's behind Orton's creepy smile and stolen away with it.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2007 | Charlotte Stoudt, Special to The Times
British trickster Joe Orton was the Mick Jagger of modern drama: a provocateur heralding a world newly disordered, a sexy beast strutting through the swinging '60s with promiscuous talent. But Orton died young, leaving us with only a handful of farces that are blindingly funny and hard to pull off. Now Glendale's A Noise Within evidences its usual intrepidness by tackling "Loot," Orton's 1965 razz at Catholicism, death and the classic English detective story. Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The title character in Joe Orton's "Entertaining Mr. Sloane" is "lethal and charming, a combination of magical black-leather meanness and boyish innocence--a sexy shadow of Orton's fantasy of himself," wrote Orton biographer John Lahr. When Orton created Sloane in 1963, the playwright was 30, about a decade older than the character but still young enough to feel close to this incorrigible boy toy.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1999 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
When Joe Orton saw Tom Stoppard's "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead" in 1967, he acknowledged in his diary that Stoppard's riff on "Hamlet" contained "a wonderful idea . . . how I wish I'd stumbled upon it." Orton imagined richly ironic possibilities, with Shakespeare's graduate students yakking away while the world goes to hell. Four months later, the most notorious English dramatist of the '60s was murdered by longtime companion Kenneth Halliwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Orton's farce masterpiece, "What the Butler Saw," obeys the absurd logic of a crackpot world. To begin with, it has no butler (unless it's Orton). We, the audience, are the collective witness. Besides, a sensible character like a butler would only have gotten in Orton's way. If he'd needed an explanatory title, he might have called the play--first produced in 1969, two years after he was killed by his lover--"The Lunatic Variations."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Orton's farce masterpiece, "What the Butler Saw," obeys the absurd logic of a crackpot world. To begin with, it has no butler (unless it's Orton). We, the audience, are the collective witness. Besides, a sensible character like a butler would only have gotten in Orton's way. If he'd needed an explanatory title, he might have called the play--first produced in 1969, two years after he was killed by his lover--"The Lunatic Variations."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | LAURIE WINER, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
After a brief failed run a year before, "Loot" became a London hit in 1966, when Joe Orton was 33 and mastering his art, rivaling Oscar Wilde as the funniest and most dangerous author of epigrams in the English language. One year later, Orton's lover, Kenneth Halliwell, beat his brains in with a hammer. As the critic John Lahr wrote of Orton, "He expected to die young, but he built his plays to last."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1987 | JANICE ARKATOV
Please don't ask Maxwell Caulfield to take off his shirt. Not that he's shy: A bare chest was often required for his character, Miles, on ABC's "The Colbys." And everything came off for his sunbather role in "Salonika" at the New York Public Theatre ("a small theater and people were sitting right on top of me, talking about my body. It was weird").
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Orton's farce masterpiece, "What the Butler Saw," obeys the absurd logic of a crackpot world. To begin with, it has no butler (unless it's Orton). We, the audience, are the collective witness. Besides, a sensible character like a butler would only have gotten in Orton's way. If he'd needed an explanatory title, he might have called the play--first produced in 1969, two years after he was killed by his lover--"The Lunatic Variations."
NEWS
July 14, 1994 | PHILIP BRANDES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Was your stepmother aware of your love for your father?" demands the leering psychiatrist. "I lived in a normal family," protests his unwilling patient. "I had no love for my father!" Welcome to the wicked, barbed-wire satire of Joe Orton, whose brilliant comedy "What the Butler Saw" puts a post-Freudian spin on sophisticated wit worthy of Oscar Wilde.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1993 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Orton was a playwright in the right place at the right time. If ever there was a modern society that needed skewering, it had to be London during the '60s. All that upper-crust pretension just beginning to clash with Carnaby Street pop was a fertile arena for a guy like Joe. In a brief but ballistic career, he dug in and took bites out of what he saw around him. The results were farcical, often absurdly comic and usually lowbrow.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|