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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1994
My heart is at half staff because of the death of guitarist Joe Pass ("Joe Pass, the Giant of Jazz Guitarists," May 25). His virtuosity brought so much pleasure through the years. I recall in particular his improvisational musical conversations with Ella Fitzgerald. They faced one another, looked into each other's eyes and, just like a longtime happily married couple who can complete each other's sentences, or need no words at all, they brought pure joy to the audience. Jazz fans all over the world will miss Joe Pass.
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SPORTS
January 9, 2011 | By Jamison Hensley
The Ravens rode the emotions of a determined defense and the strong arm of Joe Flacco to a 30-7 win over the Kansas City Chiefs in a wild-card game Sunday. In a playoff weekend that began with upsets, the Ravens slammed the young Chiefs by forcing five turnovers and getting two touchdown passes from Flacco, who completed 25 of 34 passes for 265 yards. The Ravens' fourth road playoff win in three seasons advanced the AFC's No. 5-seeded team to the divisional round against the Pittsburgh Steelers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
What do you give a guitar player who has everything? Perhaps that question should be amended, in the case of Joe Pass, to conclude "everything he needs." The California-based virtuoso has economic security, worldwide respect, a happy family life and a career schedule that now enables him to spend about half of each year at home. One thing Pass doesn't think he needs, he confided the other day, is more guitars.
SPORTS
June 19, 2009 | DYLAN HERNANDEZ, ON THE DODGERS
The names remain unknown. The results remain the same. The Dodgers' bullpen is still closing out games. The latest was a 3-2 victory over the Oakland A's on Thursday at Dodger Stadium that moved Manager Joe Torre past Sparky Anderson into fifth place on baseball's all-time win list with 2,195. Absent was the anchor of the otherwise anonymous group of arms that emerge from the gates behind left field, closer Jonathan Broxton, who missed his second consecutive game because of a sore toe.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Although Joe Pass and Ray Brown have similar backgrounds, they had never worked together simply as a duo until Thursday night, when they began a three-night stint at the Loa. A capacity crowd braved the rain to witness this unprecedented event. Pass opened the show alone, playing his guitar mostly finger style, holding the pick in his mouth and assuming the body-all-aching-and-wracked-with-pain expression that traditionally accompanies (and belies) his performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1997 | Don Heckman
Joe Pass was such a highly regarded jazz guitarist that it's hard to believe that the majority of his best performances were recorded after he turned 40. A promising young player in the late '40s and early '50s, he then spent a decade dealing with the problems of drug addiction. An album recorded at the Synanon drug treatment center in 1962 was the first revelation of his extraordinary ability, and a series of other attractive outings--mostly on West Coast labels--followed.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Pass, legendary jazz guitarist considered gifted as a soloist and as accompanist to such stellar singers as Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald, died Monday. He was 65. Pass, who had suffered from liver cancer for the past two years, died at USC-Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. "I think it's a gift from God that I play the guitar. I don't know how I got started," Pass told The Times in 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1994 | KURT PITZER
More than 100 friends, family and jazz heavy-hitters remembered legendary guitarist Joe Pass on Thursday as a warm, fun-loving man whose virtuosic technique will be copied by generations of jazz musicians. Whether "singing in Italian restaurants or telling bad jokes," eulogized his son, Joe Jr., Pass felt at home on stage, where, as a guitarist, "he sent forth a flurry of emotion. He played from his heart and nothing else."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 14, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
You don't have to be a jazz fan--just a fan of great music (and great fun, for that matter)--to fully appreciate the wizardry of Joe Pass. The guitarist, who lives part time in Woodland Hills and part time in Hamburg, Germany, is the genuine article, a musician with such enormous gifts that he turns everything he plays--including his mistakes--into high art. Opening a three-night run Thursday at the Vine St.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are few musicians of whom it can be said that they cannot be replaced. Guitarist Joe Pass (Joseph Anthony Passalaqua), who died Monday at the age of 65, was such a man. His was a sharply separated career. His first decade, mainly the 1950s, was a maze of problems in which drug addiction and incarceration kept him from achieving the recognition he deserved. The turning point came with a record he made in 1961 during a stay at the Synanon Foundation, a drug treatment center.
NEWS
July 18, 2002 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If the name Pisano registers only mildly to some, it resonates fairly significantly in the world of jazz guitar. Nimble Los Angeles-based guitarist John Pisano was a frequent collaborator with no less a guitar hero than the late great Joe Pass for many years. More recently, Pisano was responsible for organizing a concert series at the old Brentwood location of Rocco's.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1997 | Don Heckman
Joe Pass was such a highly regarded jazz guitarist that it's hard to believe that the majority of his best performances were recorded after he turned 40. A promising young player in the late '40s and early '50s, he then spent a decade dealing with the problems of drug addiction. An album recorded at the Synanon drug treatment center in 1962 was the first revelation of his extraordinary ability, and a series of other attractive outings--mostly on West Coast labels--followed.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1995 | Don Heckman
JOE PASS "Songs for Ellen" Fantasy Records * * * * "I like the feel and sound, including my chair squeaking and the finger noises," said Joe Pass when he heard the playbacks for this album, recorded shortly before he died last May at the age of 65. "It sounds like I'm at home, and I like that." Listeners will like it too, on several counts. At the very least, this is great music for late-night atmosphere.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
The principal players were not all on stage for Wednesday night's "Guitar Greats" concert at the Hollywood Bowl. Mundell Lowe, Lee Ritenour and George Benson did the performing, but the images and the echoes of Joe Pass and Wes Montgomery were equally present. Lowe appeared in place of Pass, who died after the program was scheduled. It was an appropriate replacement. Lowe's straight- ahead playing clearly springs from the same origins as Pass' benchmark jazz style.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1994
My heart is at half staff because of the death of guitarist Joe Pass ("Joe Pass, the Giant of Jazz Guitarists," May 25). His virtuosity brought so much pleasure through the years. I recall in particular his improvisational musical conversations with Ella Fitzgerald. They faced one another, looked into each other's eyes and, just like a longtime happily married couple who can complete each other's sentences, or need no words at all, they brought pure joy to the audience. Jazz fans all over the world will miss Joe Pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1994 | KURT PITZER
More than 100 friends, family and jazz heavy-hitters remembered legendary guitarist Joe Pass on Thursday as a warm, fun-loving man whose virtuosic technique will be copied by generations of jazz musicians. Whether "singing in Italian restaurants or telling bad jokes," eulogized his son, Joe Jr., Pass felt at home on stage, where, as a guitarist, "he sent forth a flurry of emotion. He played from his heart and nothing else."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Joe Pass, the most honored jazz guitarist of the past decade (he has won dozens of awards as No. 1 in his field since his first Down Beat poll victory in 1975), has entered a new stage of his illustrious career. No, he hasn't moved into the nether world of fuzz tones, flanges and frequency analyzers. His guitar still sounds like a guitar. No, he hasn't mastered the art of playing while lying supine on the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1992 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Pass is a fun guy to talk to because the legendary jazz guitarist doesn't take himself too seriously. So once the obligatory questions about his latest guitar (a Gibson), new album (Christmas songs), recent touring experiences (in Europe), and theories on practicing (he doesn't) have run their course, conversation turns to what he does in his spare time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are few musicians of whom it can be said that they cannot be replaced. Guitarist Joe Pass (Joseph Anthony Passalaqua), who died Monday at the age of 65, was such a man. His was a sharply separated career. His first decade, mainly the 1950s, was a maze of problems in which drug addiction and incarceration kept him from achieving the recognition he deserved. The turning point came with a record he made in 1961 during a stay at the Synanon Foundation, a drug treatment center.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Pass, legendary jazz guitarist considered gifted as a soloist and as accompanist to such stellar singers as Frank Sinatra, Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald, died Monday. He was 65. Pass, who had suffered from liver cancer for the past two years, died at USC-Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. "I think it's a gift from God that I play the guitar. I don't know how I got started," Pass told The Times in 1992.
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