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Joe Paterno

NATIONAL
July 16, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Joe Paterno's family continued its fight Monday to save the reputation of one of college football's most honored coaches, insisting that it will conduct its own investigation into the Penn State University child sex-abuse scandal tied to Jerry Sandusky. Meanwhile, reports that Sandusky may have abused some victims as early as the 1970s raised new questions about the already complicated legal liability issues in the scandal. Citing "sources close to the Jerry Sandusky case," the Patriot-News reported that three men have told police that they were abused in the 1970s or 1980s by Sandusky, who was convicted in June on 45 criminal charges of sexually abusing boys.
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OPINION
July 14, 2012
Re "This is about football," Column, July 13 Decent people are greatly in the debt of former FBI Director Louis Freeh and his team of investigators for conducting a truly independent investigation into the atrocities that occurred at Penn State University. The report is stunning and horrific, and it needs to be widely absorbed in the hope that what happened on such a grand scale at Penn State will never be allowed to occur anywhere else. There are many individuals in positions of authority who are culpable in enabling former football coach Jerry Sandusky to continue his crimes, but the late head coach Joe Paterno stands out as one whose actions, and lack of action, is particularly shameful.
SPORTS
July 13, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Legendary former Florida State football coach Bobby Bowden says Penn State should remove the statue of Joe Paterno because the statue will be a constant reminder of the Jerry Sandusky scandal. Bowden made the comments in a radio interview with Cory Giger in State College, Pa. "Should his statue be removed? In my opinion, yes," Bowden said. "Now the reason is, Penn State's job now is to try to forget this thing. But every time somebody walks by and sees that statue, they're not going to remember the 80 good years, they're going to remember this thing with Sandusky.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
"Failed to protect a child predator from harming children for over a decade. " This is Joe Paterno. This is Penn State "A striking lack of empathy for child-abuse victims. " This is the one of the most revered leaders in the history of American sports. This is the school that blindly followed him. "Total and consistent disregard by the most senior leaders at Penn State for the safety and welfare of … child victims. " It's now official.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
Fittingly, the most chilling part of Louis J. Freeh's lengthy condemnation of Penn State University and its legendary football coach Joe Paterno involves two men more fearful of a football program than a child molester. According to the 267-page internal report released Thursday, in the fall of 2000, two janitors spotted former longtime Penn State assistant coach Jerry Sandusky behaving inappropriately with a young boy in the campus showers. The men said they didn't to go to police because they were afraid that Paterno would order them fired.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012 | By Michael Muskal and Devon Lash
PHILADELPHIA — Driven in part by the powerful culture of its football program, the top leaders of Penn State University agreed to conceal child sexual abuse allegations against assistant coach Jerry Sandusky for more than a decade, choosing to preserve the university's reputation over protecting the victims of a pedophile, according to a damning report by special investigators. In a scandal that has roiled the world of big-time college athletics, Penn State's most senior officials — including legendary head football coach Joe Paterno — showed "total disregard" for the abuse victims, concealed crucial information and failed at least twice to act on sexual assault accusations against one of their own because they feared the consequences of bad publicity on the university, the 267-page report by former FBI director Louis Freeh said.
SPORTS
July 10, 2012 | Staff and wire reports
Blake Griffin signed a five-year contract extension with the Clippers on Tuesday night that could be worth up to $95 million. The deal could keep Griffin, who has an opt-out clause after the fourth year of the extension, in a Clippers uniform until 2018. Griffin signed the contract in Las Vegas, where he was training with the U.S. basketball team in preparation for the London Olympics. Clippers President Andy Roeser and director of player personnel Gary Sacks flew from Los Angeles to Las Vegas to get their All-Star power forward signed.
NATIONAL
June 22, 2012 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Jurors weighing the fate of former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky listened to fiery closing arguments and began deliberations Thursday, while outside their hearing one of Sandusky's sons said he too had been abused by his father. Almost 81/2 hours after deliberations began, jurors asked to rehear testimony about an alleged shower encounter between Sandusky and a boy of 10 or 12. Jurors wanted to revisit the testimony of Mike McQueary, who said he saw a sex act, and of McQueary's friend Dr. Jonathan Dranov, who described a less graphic version that he said McQueary told him in 2001.
NATIONAL
June 21, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
After dozens of witnesses and days of listening to often graphic and painful testimony, jurors began their deliberations in the highly publicized case of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, accused of sexually abusing children for years. The jury of seven woman and five men received the case Thursday afternoon. Sandusky had a distinguished sports career at Penn State, just a few miles down the road from the Bellefonte, Pa., courtroom where the case began with opening statements June 11. The criminal charges announced last year led to the dismissal of iconic football coach Joe Paterno and university president Graham Spanier after trustees questioned how they investigated reports of abuse.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
The sixth of the accusers who say they were abused by Jerry Sandusky took the witness stand Thursday and described being embraced in the shower by the former Penn State football coach who called himself the “tickle monster.” The prosecution in the highly publicized case is coming to a close and could finish as soon as Thursday, Judge John Cleland told jurors. So far, the jury of seven women and five men has heard from seven of the eight alleged victims. Jurors have also heard from adults describing two other cases in which the identities of the children have not been ascertained by investigators.
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