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Joe Penhall

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The actor Rhys Ifans rarely alters his droopy-guy look -- and why should he? It's worked for him since Roger Michell cast him as Hugh Grant's slobby roommate in "Notting Hill." Now Michell has directed an adaptation of Booker Prize winner Ian McEwan's novel "Enduring Love," and he's endowed Ifans with a far meatier, more complex role. In the new movie, Ifans reprises the shaggy Jesus look that made him famous, but perversely subverts it. After this, he may have to retire the image for good.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Remember "Stardust Memories," the 1980 Woody Allen film in which a director is repeatedly implored -- by his fans, and even a space alien -- to quit being so serious and go back to making movies like his "earlier, funnier ones"? Anglo-Australian playwright Joe Penhall has the problem in reverse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2005 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Remember "Stardust Memories," the 1980 Woody Allen film in which a director is repeatedly implored -- by his fans, and even a space alien -- to quit being so serious and go back to making movies like his "earlier, funnier ones"? Anglo-Australian playwright Joe Penhall has the problem in reverse.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
The actor Rhys Ifans rarely alters his droopy-guy look -- and why should he? It's worked for him since Roger Michell cast him as Hugh Grant's slobby roommate in "Notting Hill." Now Michell has directed an adaptation of Booker Prize winner Ian McEwan's novel "Enduring Love," and he's endowed Ifans with a far meatier, more complex role. In the new movie, Ifans reprises the shaggy Jesus look that made him famous, but perversely subverts it. After this, he may have to retire the image for good.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2005
William Friedkin, the Academy Award-winning movie director and also director of the L.A. Opera's "Ariadne auf Naxos" last year, will stage Tracy Letts' "The Man From Nebraska," a 2004 Pulitzer Prize finalist, at South Coast Repertory's Argyros Stage next season. Also announced on a partial list of South Coast's 2005-06 season are Brecht's "The Caucasian Chalk Circle," which will open the Segerstrom Stage season on Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2001 | Jana J. Monji
Joe Penhall's play "Love and Understanding," at the Lillian Theatre's Elephant Off Main venue, is about love between a couple, and also the affection between friends, particularly friends not good to or for each other. Neal's (Brian Morri) old friend Richie (Maury Sterling) has just broken up with his girlfriend and now deviously insinuates himself into Neal's home and life.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2003 | Don Shirley
The Old Globe Theatre in San Diego will present the West Coast premiere of Arthur Miller's latest play, "Resurrection Blues," March 18 to April 18, 2004. "Resurrection Blues," a satire set in a totalitarian state, premiered at the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis last summer. Also occupying the Old Globe during the 2003-04 season will be Tom Stoppard's "Rough Crossing" (Sept. 18-Oct. 26), William Inge's "Bus Stop" (Jan. 22-Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | MATT WOLF, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Jessica Lange, the two-time Oscar-winning film star, received her first Olivier nomination Thursday, while two little-known Irishmen, bound for Broadway in the same play, are both up for best actor. Winners of the 25th annual Laurence Olivier Awards--London's nearest equivalent to Broadway's Tony--will be announced Feb. 23.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, "Blue/Orange" looks like one of those argumentative plays such as "Art," which also has a cast of three men. But the stakes in "Blue/Orange," at the Old Globe Theatre, are considerably higher. A man's life is on the line. He's a mental patient named Christopher (Teagle F. Bougere).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2009 | By Scott Timberg
So many people are killed -- so graphically -- in some of his books that it's almost unimaginable. In his latest novel, it's after the end of the world, and besides wandering and waiting, almost nothing happens. He's renowned for his dialogue, but tends to ignore plot and doesn't use quotation marks. The author was so poor he couldn't afford toothpaste, but refused to do anything to promote his work. It's the biography of a starving artist, not a Hollywood player. But with this week's release of "The Road," Cormac McCarthy -- the reclusive author who told Oprah Winfrey that he didn't care if people read his books -- will be officially enshrined as one of Hollywood's hottest properties.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2001 | DIANE HAITHMAN
THEATER Olivier Awards: Stephen Sondheim and Arthur Miller dominated the honors Friday at the 25th annual Olivier Awards, the English equivalent of America's Tonys. "Merrily We Roll Along," a 20-year-old Sondheim musical only now receiving its professional London debut, won three top Oliviers, including best musical--beating out Andrew Lloyd Webber's "The Beautiful Game" and the latest Cameron Mackintosh venture, "The Witches of Eastwick."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2005 | F. Kathleen Foley;David C. Nichols
"What I Heard About Iraq," a world premiere at the Fountain Theatre, is a grim outpouring that chronologically categorizes the disorganization, misinformation and bureaucratic snafus surrounding the U.S. military involvement in Iraq. Adaptor Simon Levy, who also directs, based his work on an Elliot Weinberger article that first appeared in the London Review of Books.
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