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Joe Pernice

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Scott Timberg
The narrator abandons his marriage on the first day of his honeymoon. His friends -- aimless, stunted or waiting for their lives to begin -- drink alone or together, but mostly joylessly. One young woman guzzles canned beers to absorb the memory of a drowned child. Author Joe Pernice, who spent almost a year living intensely with these bleak characters, says he's been having the time of his life. "I'm not just the narrator," he says of his novel "It Feels So Good When I Stop," set in the dreary months of off-season Cape Cod. "I'm all the people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Scott Timberg
The narrator abandons his marriage on the first day of his honeymoon. His friends -- aimless, stunted or waiting for their lives to begin -- drink alone or together, but mostly joylessly. One young woman guzzles canned beers to absorb the memory of a drowned child. Author Joe Pernice, who spent almost a year living intensely with these bleak characters, says he's been having the time of his life. "I'm not just the narrator," he says of his novel "It Feels So Good When I Stop," set in the dreary months of off-season Cape Cod. "I'm all the people.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Some say Joe Pernice is just another guy who can't commit. In the early '90s, nights spent playing mournful Appalachian ballads in a friend's kitchen after punk-rock shows converted him from punk to dour alt-country troubadour. A few years later, he lost interest in country, giving up its plain-spoken rawness for the lush, sometimes orchestrated chamber pop of a new band called the Pernice Brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2003 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Some say Joe Pernice is just another guy who can't commit. In the early '90s, nights spent playing mournful Appalachian ballads in a friend's kitchen after punk-rock shows converted him from punk to dour alt-country troubadour. A few years later, he lost interest in country, giving up its plain-spoken rawness for the lush, sometimes orchestrated chamber pop of a new band called the Pernice Brothers.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2009
What's on your summer reading list? Maybe you've got it all worked out already, but if you don't, here are 60 possibilities, arranged by the months in which they'll be published -- the best of this summer's forthcoming reads. -- JUNE And Then There's This How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture By Bill Wasik Viking A snapshot of our information age's frenzied metamorphosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2005 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
SUFJAN STEVENS and his six backing musicians are wearing identical green T-shirts emblazoned with the words "Come on Feel the Illinoise" as they play a short set of his songs for a Southern California audience. The question is, why synchronize the wardrobe when they're performing on the radio? "I think it just helps us to feel kind of unified," Stevens says after the recent performance on KCRW-FM's "Morning Becomes Eclectic" program. "It puts us in the attitude of respect for our audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
In a bohemian stretch of Sunset Boulevard that winds through Silver Lake, there's a stereo repair shop with an exterior that seems, for some, oddly familiar: The coiling red and blue lines on its external wall served as the cover for an album by a battered troubadour named Elliott Smith, a Los Angeles musician who at the time of the record's release, in 2000, was one of pop's bright lights -- someone who combined dark, sometimes self-lacerating lyrics with melody inspired by the British
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