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Joe Rivers

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SPORTS
June 25, 1999
In 1955, the late Times sportswriter Frank Finch noticed a small item buried inside the paper, about a pedestrian, Joe Rivers, 63, struck by a car in downtown Los Angeles. Could it be, Finch wondered, the Joe Rivers? Mexican Joe Rivers? The Lethal Latin--the great early century lightweight fighter? It was. Finch visited Rivers in the hospital, arranging for a later interview.
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SPORTS
June 25, 1999
In 1955, the late Times sportswriter Frank Finch noticed a small item buried inside the paper, about a pedestrian, Joe Rivers, 63, struck by a car in downtown Los Angeles. Could it be, Finch wondered, the Joe Rivers? Mexican Joe Rivers? The Lethal Latin--the great early century lightweight fighter? It was. Finch visited Rivers in the hospital, arranging for a later interview.
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SPORTS
July 4, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty years ago today, 11,000 Los Angeles boxing fans filed into a stadium in Vernon to watch a fight. They wound up seeing a near-riot. The disturbance erupted when the referee botched the closest thing boxing has had to a true double knockout. It was a title bout, Adolfus (Ad) Wolgast of Cadillac, Mich., defending his world lightweight championship against Joe Rivers of Los Angeles. Rivers, 20, was an artful boxer who had lost only once in two years.
SPORTS
July 4, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eighty years ago today, 11,000 Los Angeles boxing fans filed into a stadium in Vernon to watch a fight. They wound up seeing a near-riot. The disturbance erupted when the referee botched the closest thing boxing has had to a true double knockout. It was a title bout, Adolfus (Ad) Wolgast of Cadillac, Mich., defending his world lightweight championship against Joe Rivers of Los Angeles. Rivers, 20, was an artful boxer who had lost only once in two years.
SPORTS
June 11, 1986 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Dave Coapman is a boxing fan, but you've probably never heard of most of his favorite boxers. They have one thing in common, though. They're all in cemeteries. "I can't explain it," Coapman said the other day, walking past rows of headstones at East Los Angeles' Calvary Cemetery. "I enjoy reading about turn-of-the-century boxers. I spend a lot of evenings at the Glendale public library, reading microfilm copies of L.A.
SPORTS
February 23, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
It was just one word, one brief thought from a dreamy kid about an upstart university, seven taps on a rattling typewriter, one word stuck deep in the first sentence of a thick first paragraph. But for both the school and the sports columnist, it was one word that changed their worlds. His name was Owen R. Bird, he was 25, and he had been with the Los Angeles Times barely five months when one of his influential readers made an unusual request. He was asked by Warren Bovard, USC's athletic director, to end the circus of monikers given the school's athletic teams — Methodists, Wesleyans and Cards — and find one powerful nickname that would stick.
NEWS
July 21, 1996 | Ray Loynd
In her most serious role since "The Color Purple," Oprah Winfrey (right) plays the real-life, down-but-not-out single mother LaJoe Rivers in this burnished, gritty 1993 TV movie. She's a determined person who wages war on behalf of her kids from a squalid apartment in the Chicago housing project. Director Anita W. Addison doesn't flinch from the requisite violence but she doesn't exploit it either. Maya Angelou (left) plays LaJoe's equally gritty mother (ABC Thursday at 9 p.m.).
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | WENDY LEOPOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From his second-floor apartment on the city's north side, Alex Kotlowitz can look out on a small park created by some of his neighbors. A garden there is tended each summer by neighborhood children. But Kotlowitz's gaze has not been on the park across the street or the children working in its garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1993 | RAY LOYND
We tend to forget about Oprah the actress. Before America fell in love with Oprah the talk-show host, there was Oprah's vivid performance as Sofia in the movie "The Color Purple." But after the popularity of "The Oprah Winfrey Show," how does Oprah disappear into another character and make you forget who she is? The answer is that she can't, but if the story material is textured enough, it doesn't matter that much.
NEWS
June 13, 2001 | From Associated Press
A couple locked an 8-year-old girl for four months in a dark, lice-infested closet, where she lay on a urine-stained blanket and ate bits of bread and water, authorities alleged Tuesday. The malnourished girl weighed only 25 pounds when she was rescued Monday night. The 4-by-8-foot closet was littered with human waste and soiled clothing.
SPORTS
June 11, 1986 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Dave Coapman is a boxing fan, but you've probably never heard of most of his favorite boxers. They have one thing in common, though. They're all in cemeteries. "I can't explain it," Coapman said the other day, walking past rows of headstones at East Los Angeles' Calvary Cemetery. "I enjoy reading about turn-of-the-century boxers. I spend a lot of evenings at the Glendale public library, reading microfilm copies of L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1997 | Cecilia Rasmussen
The city of Vernon is best known today for its meatpacking plants and slaughterhouses, but nearly a century ago it was famous for the sort of beef that comes on two feet. Just after the turn of the century, in fact, the little town vied with Madison Square Garden for the title of "Boxing Capital of the World."
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