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Joe Roth

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BUSINESS
March 12, 1995
A fascinating tale of intrigue, cabal and "see no evil" at the three divisions of Walt Disney Motion Pictures, the new unit headed by Joe Roth ("Disney Skull Session: Button Your Lip," Feb. 21). The article gives the impression that Disney has forgotten how to make movies (not quite true if you look at triumphs like "Pretty Woman") and that Roth is going to turn all that around. Seems to me Roth's most recent effort at producing, the recently released "Jerky Boys" (the credits say "produced by Joe Roth")
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BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Claudia Eller
Joe Roth was once Hollywood's golden boy. As a scrappy producer in the 1980s, he co-founded the independent movie company behind such low-budget hits as "Major League" and "Young Guns," then went on to run two major studios -- 20th Century Fox and Disney -- before leaving corporate life in 2000 to launch lavishly financed Revolution Studios, which employed 55 people. But after more than two decades of good fortune, his star turn ended when Revolution produced more flops than hits and went under after seven years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1994 | Elaine Dutka
Then: Chairman of 20th Century Fox, 1989-1992. Now: After heading up his own Caravan Pictures, was appointed chairman of Walt Disney Motion Pictures Group, September, 1994. * Before accepting the job of chairman of Fox, Roth had never received a weekly paycheck. For a maverick producer with a deep distrust of the system, the job was a turning point in more ways than one. "Part of me felt like I was in a straitjacket," Roth, 46, recalls. "I was more reactive than active.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Since he closed up Revolution Studios, Joe Roth has kept his hand in the movie business -- he's got projects at Sony, Fox and Disney, where he's producing Tim Burton's "Alice in Wonderland." But he's spending most of his time with his new love, commuting up to Seattle, where he's the majority owner of the Seattle Sounders FC, the new Major League Soccer expansion team that begins play next spring. A lifelong sports junkie -- he spent years coaching his son's soccer team, has courtside Lakers seats and knows more obscure baseball stats than Bill James -- Roth has discovered that soccer is a great laboratory to test out both Internet-community-based marketing and Hollywood-style glitz.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Joe ROTH is trying to put a continent's worth of distance between himself and Hollywood. For the last two decades he's been a studio chief and power broker, these days as head of Revolution Studios. But when he woke up at the crack of dawn, eager to get to the set of "Freedomland," the film he's been directing here since early April, he realized he still hadn't quite freed himself from his old business entanglements.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1994 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though he broke into the business as the maverick co-founder of independent Morgan Creek Productions, Joe Roth is no newcomer to Hollywood's rough-and-tumble corporate world. For more than three years, he sat in Darryl F. Zanuck's old office as the chairman of 20th Century Fox. A former director and producer, he was one of Hollywood's only filmmakers to assume the post of studio chief before starting Caravan Pictures at Disney nearly two years ago.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's become a familiar refrain in the last six years: A top Walt Disney Co. executive chafes under the demanding style of Chief Executive Michael Eisner, then quits to do something else. Add studio chief Joe Roth, one of Hollywood's most powerful and successful executives, to the swelling ranks of about 75 high-level Disney alumni that include such familiar names in the entertainment business as Jeffrey Katzenberg, Michael Ovitz and Geraldine Laybourne, most of whom have left since 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1998
Joe Roth is on a roll--finally. The 50-year-old chairman of Walt Disney Studios had a difficult fall, with two of the studio's most anticipated films ("Beloved" and "Holy Man") tanking. But lately, there's no stopping him. "A Bug's Life" has easily bested the season's other animated ant movie (DreamWorks SKG's "Antz"). Jerry Bruckheimer's "Enemy of the State" has performed well. And Adam Sandler's "The Waterboy" had the studio's second-highest opening weekend ever and is still going strong.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1991 | ELAINE DUTKA, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer.
On a shelf in Joe Roth's airy, creme-colored office on the Century City lot of 20th Century Fox--an office once occupied by the legendary Darryl F. Zanuck--is a photograph taken of Roth and Tom Sherak, Fox's marketing and distribution chief, shortly after Roth was named chairman of the studio. On the photo, Sherak wrote in white ink: "Joe: May all your troubles be small . . . and all your pictures big."
MAGAZINE
March 26, 2000 | James Bates and Claudia Eller
On the January Friday after he quit as head of the Walt Disney Studios, Joe Roth drove his black Range Rover to the Lantana Center office complex in Santa Monica looking for space to house his new movie production company. There was a deja vu feeling to the drive. Seven years before, he had made the same trip for the same reason, after quitting the same kind of prestigious studio job as head of 20th Century Fox to start Caravan Pictures.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2005 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Joe ROTH is trying to put a continent's worth of distance between himself and Hollywood. For the last two decades he's been a studio chief and power broker, these days as head of Revolution Studios. But when he woke up at the crack of dawn, eager to get to the set of "Freedomland," the film he's been directing here since early April, he realized he still hadn't quite freed himself from his old business entanglements.
BUSINESS
June 25, 2004 | Claudia Eller and Michael Cieply, Times Staff Writers
Joe Roth is down to two hours' sleep a night. Movie previews and marketing meetings at his Revolution Studios are squeezed into Sundays to fit his schedule. The rest of Roth's week, nights included, belong to directing the comedy "Christmas With the Kranks" starring Tim Allen and Jamie Lee Curtis. On top of that, he would love to be asked to produce next year's Oscars, as he did for the show in February.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz and John Horn, Times Staff Writers
Backstage at the Kodak Theatre three days before the Academy Awards, Oscar producer Joe Roth is swimming in Hollywood royalty. Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg have just finished rehearsing their speeches. Renee Zellweger waits for her run-through in the green room. At this very moment, Roth's as popular as anyone in show business could ever be. You would never know he needs a hit.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2001 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Geoffrey Ammer has been installed as president of marketing at Sony Pictures Entertainment's Columbia TriStar Marketing Group. Assuming the post Sept. 4, Ammer will be second-in-command to the studio's worldwide marketing and distribution chief, Jeff Blake. The appointment would appear to be yet another signal that Revolution Studios chief Joe Roth is considering an opportunity to run Sony Pictures.
BUSINESS
June 7, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JIM BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Walt Disney Studios chief Joe Roth has secured $250 million in equity financing for his new independent movie and new-media venture, Revolution Studios, from major entertainment firms Sony Pictures, pay-TV giant Starz Encore Group and Fox Entertainment Group. Starz Encore is the largest investor, putting in $150 million for domestic pay-television rights. This is the first investment by Starz Encore and its parent, Liberty Media Corp.
BUSINESS
April 25, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Onetime Walt Disney Studios top business executive Rob Moore has been hired by his former Disney boss, Joe Roth, to run Roth's new entertainment venture. The widely anticipated move makes Moore, a 13-year Disney veteran, the head of day-to-day operations for Roth's yet-to-be-named Santa Monica company. In addition to focusing on movie production, Moore will be looking for various business opportunities and overseeing the start-up company's Internet strategies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1994 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Genie is back in the bottle. The yearlong feud between actor Robin Williams and the Walt Disney Co. is over. Williams, who last autumn accused Disney of lying to him and breaching an agreement not to use his voice to merchandise products inspired by the hit animated film "Aladdin," has received an apology from newly installed studio chief Joe Roth. Both sides say they will now discuss movie projects, although no official deal yet exists.
NATIONAL
February 29, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz and John Horn, Times Staff Writers
Backstage at the Kodak Theatre three days before the Academy Awards, Oscar producer Joe Roth is swimming in Hollywood royalty. Tom Hanks and Steven Spielberg have just finished rehearsing their speeches. Renee Zellweger waits for her run-through in the green room. At this very moment, Roth's as popular as anyone in show business could ever be. You would never know he needs a hit.
MAGAZINE
March 26, 2000 | James Bates and Claudia Eller
On the January Friday after he quit as head of the Walt Disney Studios, Joe Roth drove his black Range Rover to the Lantana Center office complex in Santa Monica looking for space to house his new movie production company. There was a deja vu feeling to the drive. Seven years before, he had made the same trip for the same reason, after quitting the same kind of prestigious studio job as head of 20th Century Fox to start Caravan Pictures.
NEWS
January 13, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It's become a familiar refrain in the last six years: A top Walt Disney Co. executive chafes under the demanding style of Chief Executive Michael Eisner, then quits to do something else. Add studio chief Joe Roth, one of Hollywood's most powerful and successful executives, to the swelling ranks of about 75 high-level Disney alumni that include such familiar names in the entertainment business as Jeffrey Katzenberg, Michael Ovitz and Geraldine Laybourne, most of whom have left since 1994.
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