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Joe Sacco

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By David L. Ulin
Footnotes in Gaza Joe Sacco Metropolitan: 418 pp., $29.95 Joe Sacco's "Footnotes in Gaza" is not a sequel to his 1996 book "Palestine," although it's tempting to read it as such. Both are works of comic-book journalism that take place in the occupied territories, and both offer a ground's-eye-view of situations that seem too big, too incomprehensible for us to wrap our minds around. But while "Palestine" is a portrait of its moment, an account of Sacco's visit to the West Bank and Gaza during the early 1990s, "Footnotes in Gaza" is a more expansive effort.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
When it comes to gift books, I find myself drawn to some unorthodox choices this year. At the head of my list is Joe Sacco's "The Great War" (W.W. Norton, boxed, $35): a single panoramic drawing - 24 feet long, and accordion-folded in a slipcase - that portrays, in graphic intensity, one of the bloodiest events of the 20th century, the first day of the Battle of the Somme. And yet, in its ingenuity, its beauty and (yes) its tactile engagement, it stirs us in a variety of dimensions: the book as objet d'art . This is the secret story of the digital era, that computer production has opened the possibilities of what books are and how we connect with them, not only on screen but also on the page.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
If our present era constitutes a sort of End Times for mainstream media, it's proving to be a golden age for Joe Sacco and other practitioners of comic-book reportage. Balkan blood feuds, the "war on terror" and the agonies of post-diluvium New Orleans are just a few topics taken up by graphic journalists of late. No doubt, some intrepid cartoonist-correspondent is currently roaming Port-au-Prince, sketchbook and flip-cam in hand. Sacco, 49, isn't just one of this evolving medium's most skilled advocates.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
For Joe Sacco, the decision to do "The Great War" (W.W. Norton: boxed, unpaged, $35) grew out of a kind of dare. The idea - to create a panoramic drawing of the Western Front, and more specifically, the first day of the Battle of the Somme - had been a source of late-night conversation in the 1990s, when he'd shared a New York apartment with a young editor named Matt Weiland, who, like Sacco, was fascinated by the First World War. Fifteen years...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the preface to his new book "Journalism," Joe Sacco pinpoints the challenges of the comics artist who seeks to be a reporter: "Aren't drawings by their very nature subjective?" he asks, before answering with a simple "yes. " And yet, this has been Sacco's point all along, that, in the words of Edward R. Murrow, "Everyone is a prisoner of his own experiences. No one can eliminate prejudices - just recognize them. " The rap on Sacco, of course, is that he is less a journalist than an advocate, who in such works as "Palestine" and "Footnotes in Gaza" blurs the line between observer and activist.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
For Joe Sacco, the decision to do "The Great War" (W.W. Norton: boxed, unpaged, $35) grew out of a kind of dare. The idea - to create a panoramic drawing of the Western Front, and more specifically, the first day of the Battle of the Somme - had been a source of late-night conversation in the 1990s, when he'd shared a New York apartment with a young editor named Matt Weiland, who, like Sacco, was fascinated by the First World War. Fifteen years...
BOOKS
June 11, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS, Christopher Hitchens, a columnist for Vanity Fair, is the author of numerous books, including the just-published paperback "No One Left to Lie To: The Politics of America's Worst Family" (Verso). His essay will appear as the introduction to "Safe Area Gorazde."
In Sarajevo in the summer of 1992, when the journalistic community (which had already annexed the old British phrase "the hacks" as its collective noun) met in the bar of the disfigured Holiday Inn--and that phrase itself suggests the surreal nature of things, with a Holiday Inn being disfigured rather than disfiguring--there were all sorts of competitive anecdotes about near-misses, random encounters and different styles of flak jacket.
SPORTS
February 21, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT
U.S. defenseman Peter Laviolette and center Joe Sacco sat out practice Sunday. Laviolette has a cold and a sore right hip. Sacco has a bruised right foot suffered when he blocked a shot Saturday.
SPORTS
December 3, 1996 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD
Catching the Pacific Division-leading Colorado Avalanche might be out of the question, but winger Joe Sacco believes the Ducks won't be in last place much longer. "Anybody else can be caught," Sacco said. Sacco's goal Sunday against Edmonton was his first point in six games.
SPORTS
February 28, 1995 | ROBYN NORWOOD
The Mighty Ducks assigned disappointing rookie right wing Valeri Karpov to minor league affiliate San Diego on Monday and brought up rookie center David Sacco. Karpov, 23, was the Ducks' second-leading scorer in the preseason but has not been as effective since the shortened season began. After 14 games, he has one goal and two assists and has a plus-minus of minus-10.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2012 | By David Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
In the preface to his new book "Journalism," Joe Sacco pinpoints the challenges of the comics artist who seeks to be a reporter: "Aren't drawings by their very nature subjective?" he asks, before answering with a simple "yes. " And yet, this has been Sacco's point all along, that, in the words of Edward R. Murrow, "Everyone is a prisoner of his own experiences. No one can eliminate prejudices - just recognize them. " The rap on Sacco, of course, is that he is less a journalist than an advocate, who in such works as "Palestine" and "Footnotes in Gaza" blurs the line between observer and activist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2010 | By Reed Johnson
If our present era constitutes a sort of End Times for mainstream media, it's proving to be a golden age for Joe Sacco and other practitioners of comic-book reportage. Balkan blood feuds, the "war on terror" and the agonies of post-diluvium New Orleans are just a few topics taken up by graphic journalists of late. No doubt, some intrepid cartoonist-correspondent is currently roaming Port-au-Prince, sketchbook and flip-cam in hand. Sacco, 49, isn't just one of this evolving medium's most skilled advocates.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By David L. Ulin
Footnotes in Gaza Joe Sacco Metropolitan: 418 pp., $29.95 Joe Sacco's "Footnotes in Gaza" is not a sequel to his 1996 book "Palestine," although it's tempting to read it as such. Both are works of comic-book journalism that take place in the occupied territories, and both offer a ground's-eye-view of situations that seem too big, too incomprehensible for us to wrap our minds around. But while "Palestine" is a portrait of its moment, an account of Sacco's visit to the West Bank and Gaza during the early 1990s, "Footnotes in Gaza" is a more expansive effort.
BOOKS
February 8, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Scott Timberg is an arts writer at The Times and co-editor of "The Misread City: New Literary Los Angeles."
The Partisan Review may have folded in the last year, but alienation and ennui are alive and well in American letters. Ironically, at the same time that comic-book protagonists have earned a new literary respect, they have lost the ability to transform themselves. Instead of going from estranged loner to confident superhero, they remain alienated nebbishes -- as estranged as any hero before he dons his cape.
BOOKS
June 11, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER HITCHENS, Christopher Hitchens, a columnist for Vanity Fair, is the author of numerous books, including the just-published paperback "No One Left to Lie To: The Politics of America's Worst Family" (Verso). His essay will appear as the introduction to "Safe Area Gorazde."
In Sarajevo in the summer of 1992, when the journalistic community (which had already annexed the old British phrase "the hacks" as its collective noun) met in the bar of the disfigured Holiday Inn--and that phrase itself suggests the surreal nature of things, with a Holiday Inn being disfigured rather than disfiguring--there were all sorts of competitive anecdotes about near-misses, random encounters and different styles of flak jacket.
SPORTS
February 7, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mighty Ducks failed to pry Trevor Linden from the Vancouver Canucks, but they said Friday they got the center they coveted by acquiring Travis Green from the New York Islanders. But the Ducks also lost experience, toughness and a bit of history when they traded defenseman J.J. Daigneault, center Mark Janssens and left wing Joe Sacco to the Islanders for Green, defenseman Doug Houda and minor-league right wing Tony Tuzzolino.
SPORTS
February 28, 1995 | ROBYN NORWOOD
The Mighty Ducks assigned disappointing rookie right wing Valeri Karpov to minor league affiliate San Diego on Monday and brought up rookie center David Sacco. Karpov, 23, was the Ducks' second-leading scorer in the exhibition season but has not been as effective since the regular season began. After 14 games, he has one goal and two assists and has a plus-minus of minus-10.
SPORTS
December 14, 1995 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five goals against Binghamton is one thing, a nice memory to tuck away. After all, it's just the minors. But a goal against the Pittsburgh Penguins? Now that's something to relish, a story to tell the grandkids some day.
SPORTS
February 7, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD and LONNIE WHITE
The Mighty Ducks failed to pry Trevor Linden from the Vancouver Canucks, but said Friday they got the center they coveted by acquiring Travis Green from the New York Islanders. But the Ducks also lost experience, toughness and a bit of history when they traded defenseman J.J. Daigneault, center Mark Janssens and left wing Joe Sacco to the Islanders for Green, defenseman Doug Houda and minor-league right wing Tony Tuzzolino.
SPORTS
January 12, 1998 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD
He's considered strictly a stop-gap, but Joe Sacco apparently will do as the Ducks' top-line center until someone better comes along. What makes that unusual is that Sacco is a right winger not a center. Steve Rucchin usually centers the line with Paul Kariya and Teemu Selanne, and spent time playing between them the past few games. But since Coach Pierre Page began searching for something extra from his lineup, Sacco has taken a few turns centering the Kariya-Selanne line.
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