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December 13, 1992 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times
The first thing Joe Sample wants to talk about is the pianos--all those pianos of endless shapes and sounds and sizes at every stop on his concert tour with singer Al Jarreau. Too few of them left Sample completely satisfied. Even some of the bigger concert halls lock up their best instruments when anyone resembling a jazz or pop artist is booked for the evening, he laments. Instead, they are reserved for touring classical performers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Pianist Joe Sample may still be best known for his long stint with jazz-funk band the Crusaders, but his best work always came as an individual. Leading his trio before a packed house at Catalina Bar & Grill on Wednesday, Sample mixed tunes from a new album with ones harking back some 20 years while displaying his seductive attractions: a strong rhythmic sense; a concise, lyrical way with an improvisation; and a storyteller's skill at development.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Joe Sample makes medium art. The pianist, who offered his amalgam of jazz, pop, R&B and Latin influences during a stop at the Celebrity Theater in Anaheim, is like fellow keyboardist Ramsey Lewis: he plays unpretentiously, with more than a modicum of flair, dynamics and creativity, yet he never reaches for the skies of high art, where composition and improvisation can cause a listener to leave a venue a changed person. Sample seeks to entertain, not enlighten. He's a musician for the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Joe Sample is at the top of his game--finally. He says his new Warner Bros. album "Old Places, Old Faces," is his best, adding that the collection of easy-on-the-ear, rhythmically dynamic originals is "a perfect blend of my musics, which are jazz, rhythm and blues, gospel, Latin and classical. I have never before been able to capture them all in one place."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | ZAN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Sample makes medium art. The pianist, who offered his amalgam of jazz, pop, R&B and Latin influences Saturday at the Celebrity Theatre, is like fellow keyboardist Ramsey Lewis: he plays unpretentiously, with sincerity and with more than a modicum of flair, dynamics and creativity, yet he never reaches for the skies of high art, where compositions and improvisations can cause a listener to leave a venue a changed person. Sample seeks to entertain, not enlighten.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Sample Scholarship: A national music scholarship program has been established in the name of keyboardist-composer Joe Sample, with a goal of allowing young African Americans to stay in school and further their education. The program is sponsored by Rhodes Keyboards, Time Warner Inc., Warner Bros. Records and the United Negro College Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Pianist Joe Sample may still be best known for his long stint with jazz-funk band the Crusaders, but his best work always came as an individual. Leading his trio before a packed house at Catalina Bar & Grill on Wednesday, Sample mixed tunes from a new album with ones harking back some 20 years while displaying his seductive attractions: a strong rhythmic sense; a concise, lyrical way with an improvisation; and a storyteller's skill at development.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart is a Times free-lance jazz writer.
Keyboardist/composer Joe Sample has long believed that music speaks louder than words. So when Sample wanted to write a theme album about the demise of the black community in this country, he put hands to keys rather than pen to paper. "It was an issue I wanted to address, rather than talk about," Sample says of "Ashes to Ashes," his new Warner Bros. album. "Music is the greatest of our languages. Spoken language often needs translation, but not music."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
The last five years have been tough going for pianist Joe Sample, mainly because he's been traveling to the beat of different drummers. In 1983, drummer Nesbert (Stix) Hooper left the Crusaders, the contemporary jazz group that Hooper, Sample, tenor saxophonist Wilton Felder and trombonist Wayne Henderson founded in Houston in the early '50s, and which has been known by such names as the Night Hawks and the Jazz Crusaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Joe Sample is at the top of his game--finally. He says his new Warner Bros. album "Old Places, Old Faces," is his best, adding that the collection of easy-on-the-ear, rhythmically dynamic originals is "a perfect blend of my musics, which are jazz, rhythm and blues, gospel, Latin and classical. I have never before been able to capture them all in one place."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1992 | STEVE APPLEFORD, Steve Appleford writes regularly about music for The Times
The first thing Joe Sample wants to talk about is the pianos--all those pianos of endless shapes and sounds and sizes at every stop on his concert tour with singer Al Jarreau. Too few of them left Sample completely satisfied. Even some of the bigger concert halls lock up their best instruments when anyone resembling a jazz or pop artist is booked for the evening, he laments. Instead, they are reserved for touring classical performers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
A Sample Scholarship: A national music scholarship program has been established in the name of keyboardist-composer Joe Sample, with a goal of allowing young African Americans to stay in school and further their education. The program is sponsored by Rhodes Keyboards, Time Warner Inc., Warner Bros. Records and the United Negro College Fund.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Joe Sample makes medium art. The pianist, who offered his amalgam of jazz, pop, R&B and Latin influences during a stop at the Celebrity Theater in Anaheim, is like fellow keyboardist Ramsey Lewis: he plays unpretentiously, with more than a modicum of flair, dynamics and creativity, yet he never reaches for the skies of high art, where composition and improvisation can cause a listener to leave a venue a changed person. Sample seeks to entertain, not enlighten. He's a musician for the masses.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | ZAN STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Sample makes medium art. The pianist, who offered his amalgam of jazz, pop, R&B and Latin influences Saturday at the Celebrity Theatre, is like fellow keyboardist Ramsey Lewis: he plays unpretentiously, with sincerity and with more than a modicum of flair, dynamics and creativity, yet he never reaches for the skies of high art, where compositions and improvisations can cause a listener to leave a venue a changed person. Sample seeks to entertain, not enlighten.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1990 | ZAN STEWART, Zan Stewart is a Times free-lance jazz writer.
Keyboardist/composer Joe Sample has long believed that music speaks louder than words. So when Sample wanted to write a theme album about the demise of the black community in this country, he put hands to keys rather than pen to paper. "It was an issue I wanted to address, rather than talk about," Sample says of "Ashes to Ashes," his new Warner Bros. album. "Music is the greatest of our languages. Spoken language often needs translation, but not music."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1987 | ZAN STEWART
The last five years have been tough going for pianist Joe Sample, mainly because he's been traveling to the beat of different drummers. In 1983, drummer Nesbert (Stix) Hooper left the Crusaders, the contemporary jazz group that Hooper, Sample, tenor saxophonist Wilton Felder and trombonist Wayne Henderson founded in Houston in the early '50s, and which has been known by such names as the Night Hawks and the Jazz Crusaders.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Electric bassist Max Bennett doesn't have a high opinion of a lot of the jazz he hears nowadays--just what you'd expect from a guy who once played with Charlie Parker. But Bennett isn't a be-bop purist, by any means. He was an integral part of saxophonist Tom Scott's groundbreaking fusion outfit, the L.A. Express, back in the '70s and has recorded with the Crusaders, Joni Mitchell, Quincy Jones, Frank Zappa and the Four Tops.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
Despite its place in the Top 5 on the Billboard magazine contemporary jazz chart, this album has little to do with jazz. Commercial dance-funk rhythms--usually in the form of Marcus Miller's electric bass slaps--dominate nearly every track.
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