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Joe Sedelmaier

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
This is Calendar's third annual listing of Taste Makers, individuals who have brought a distinct focus to 1987 and who we feel will continue to influence the world of arts and entertainment long after this year passes. They were selected not so much for specific contributions in their respective fields but because they are clearly creative forces who move and shape taste. They were interviewed to find out what kinds of influences have moved and shaped them.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
This is Calendar's third annual listing of Taste Makers, individuals who have brought a distinct focus to 1987 and who we feel will continue to influence the world of arts and entertainment long after this year passes. They were selected not so much for specific contributions in their respective fields but because they are clearly creative forces who move and shape taste. They were interviewed to find out what kinds of influences have moved and shaped them.
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BUSINESS
December 20, 1987
Joe Sedelmaier, who has directed commercials for Alaska Airlines, was quoted in a Dec. 8 marketing column ("The Fact Is Back as Crash Brings Truth to Advertising") as saying, "Once people get to Los Angeles, they get their teeth capped and their hair transplanted and they don't look like anyone you know." Personally, I can't understand how he can work out of Chicago with all those gangsters and crooked politicians. And why was there no picture of Sedelmaier? Are his teeth capped?
BUSINESS
December 20, 1987
Joe Sedelmaier, who has directed commercials for Alaska Airlines, was quoted in a Dec. 8 marketing column ("The Fact Is Back as Crash Brings Truth to Advertising") as saying, "Once people get to Los Angeles, they get their teeth capped and their hair transplanted and they don't look like anyone you know." Personally, I can't understand how he can work out of Chicago with all those gangsters and crooked politicians. And why was there no picture of Sedelmaier? Are his teeth capped?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1986 | Matthew J. Costello
Videocassette games take a step up in class with Mattel Toys' "Predicaments" (retail price: $34.95), an hour soap opera parody featuring Joan Rivers, due out in late May. It revolves around the manipulations, romantic entanglements and other shenanigans of a corporate dynasty, with Gordon Jump as the magnate and Arte Johnson as the butler. Mattel claims it's the first big-budget VCR game with name talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who of us has not proclaimed in fits of frustration that the TV commercials are a helluva lot better than these stupid, idiotic shows! A special tonight, tediously but not-inappropriately called "The World's Funniest, Cleverest, Most Imaginative Commercials" (10 p.m. on Channels 2 and 8), puts that theory to the test. It's a nice break, if only for an hour. A nice break from the weary CBS schedule, anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1988
Calendar's choices of Taste Makers--people who move and shape our arts and entertainment in 1988--run the gamut. If the eight faces on the cover form a rather curious collection, it's because creative abilities come in many forms. As a result, our group's pursuits range from directing the distinguished PBS series "American Playhouse," to fronting the hard-living, hard-rock band Guns N' Roses.
NEWS
August 12, 1987 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Clara Peller, the diminutive and demanding octogenarian who made "Where's the beef?" a national cry for quality that spilled over from the hamburger grill into the political frying pan, died Tuesday at her home in Chicago. She was believed to be 86. Her daughter, Marlene Necheles, whose family had shared its home with Mrs. Peller for several years, said, "She died in her sleep." Necheles said she was not sure of the exact cause of her mother's death, but noted that "she was an elderly lady."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1991 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Reading in a recent Sunday Calendar the bill of fare for this year's Museum of Broadcasting Television Festival at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, you realize all over again how thoroughly the medium has saturated the national memory, imagination and perception of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1987 | JEFF GREENFIELD, Jeff Greenfield is an ABC news analyst. and
Call it television's dominant and recessive voices; call it the medium's superego and its id. (Hell, call it Heckle and Jeckle for all I care.) In its normal voice, TV is unfailingly polite to its audience, which makes a lot of sense considering that the audience is what TV sells to its sponsors and is therefore TV's real product. Yet every so often there is that other voice, that other persona, the one that rivets us, startles us, commands our attention precisely because it is not so nice.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer and
Bo Jackson may be best known for lugging footballs and slugging baseballs. But Monday night a Nike TV commercial featuring the dual-sport superstar on a bicycle was selected as the best national ad campaign of 1988 at the "Oscars" of advertising, the Clio Awards. The commercial, in which Jackson calmly deadpans, "When's that Tour de France thing?" was picked as best ad campaign along with two other Nike spots, including one that features an octogenarian who jogs 17 miles every day. Yet another humorous Nike TV spot, which features a fast-paced training walk as seen through the droopy eyes of a long-eared dog, also won a Clio for apparel advertising.
BUSINESS
September 8, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When E&J Gallo decided to update its image, the winemaker didn't just change ad agencies. It changed clothes. Out went those corny commercials where the duds worn by the singing actors had about as much pizazz as "Lawrence Welk" reruns. In their place came a crop of ads with young couples decked in snazzy outfits. This time, the fashions were so carefully selected that stylists even made certain the clothing didn't clash with the color of the wine.
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