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Joe Sestak

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OPINION
May 27, 2010
It's no secret that the Obama administration wanted Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) to drop his primary challenge to Republican-turned-Democrat Sen. Arlen Specter. But did President Obama's representatives try to entice Sestak into leaving the race by promising him a job? It's a simple question, and one that Sestak already has answered in the affirmative, but the administration continues to treat the issue as much ado about nothing. Actually, it's much ado about something. Yes, political factors often influence appointments in unsavory ways — witness the practice of awarding ambassadorships to campaign contributors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Colby Itkowitz, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Arlen Specter, the storied Pennsylvania politician who was a state institution for decades before switching political parties and losing in a Democratic Senate primary two years ago, is hospitalized with a very serious illness. Specter, who survived a brain tumor and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, is ailing from another form of cancer that flared up several weeks ago, according to CNN. Several sources at the Republican National Convention who know Specter confirmed that he is very sick. Specter, 82, famously co-authored the "single-bullet theory" during the investigation into President Kennedy's assassination.
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NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Former Congressman Pat Toomey has defeated Democrat Rep. Joe Sestak in Pennsylvania's Senate race, reclaiming the seat for Republicans 19 months after incumbent Arlen Specter abandoned the party. Toomey nearly unseated Specter in a 2004 primary and looked to challenge the five-term incumbent again this year. Faced with a rematch that looked more difficult, and after a lobbying campaign led by Vice President Joe Biden, Specter decided in late April 2009 to seek reelection as a Democrat.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Michael McGough
The easy - but still important - thing to say about Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar's involuntary retirement is that it deprives the Senate of a long-serving, studious and open-to-compromise wise man. In an eloquent statement after his defeat by conservative State Treasurer Richard Mourdock, Lugar echoed retiring Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) in decrying partisan extremism and polarization. “ If that attitude prevails in American politics,” he warned, “our government will remain mired in the dysfunction we have witnessed during the last several years.” But there seems to be more to Lugar's defeat than impatience with his bipartisan approach.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to discussing the man who is running to replace him, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter would prefer the aptly named game of squash. Specter, 80, was among those who greeted President Obama on Monday when the president arrived in Philadelphia to campaign for Joe Sestak, who defeated Specter in the Democratic primary. The White House had strongly backed Specter, who converted to the Democratic Party last year, helping it to control the Senate where he had served as a top Republican since 1980.
NATIONAL
May 31, 2009 | Andrew Malcolm
Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.), who aggressively campaigned last year for Barack Obama, has decided to enter his party's primary for the U.S. Senate seat held by 79-year-old Republican-suddenly-turned-Democrat Arlen Specter. President Obama, as part of the well-publicized allegiance switcheroo to get Democrats closer to the magic 60-vote Senate margin, has already promised to campaign down the line for Specter. So loyal Joe may be out of luck. For now.
NEWS
May 9, 2012 | By Michael McGough
The easy - but still important - thing to say about Indiana Sen. Richard Lugar's involuntary retirement is that it deprives the Senate of a long-serving, studious and open-to-compromise wise man. In an eloquent statement after his defeat by conservative State Treasurer Richard Mourdock, Lugar echoed retiring Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-Maine) in decrying partisan extremism and polarization. “ If that attitude prevails in American politics,” he warned, “our government will remain mired in the dysfunction we have witnessed during the last several years.” But there seems to be more to Lugar's defeat than impatience with his bipartisan approach.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Colby Itkowitz, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
Arlen Specter, the storied Pennsylvania politician who was a state institution for decades before switching political parties and losing in a Democratic Senate primary two years ago, is hospitalized with a very serious illness. Specter, who survived a brain tumor and non-Hodgkins lymphoma, is ailing from another form of cancer that flared up several weeks ago, according to CNN. Several sources at the Republican National Convention who know Specter confirmed that he is very sick. Specter, 82, famously co-authored the "single-bullet theory" during the investigation into President Kennedy's assassination.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2010 | Andrew Malcolm
Endorsements. One of those evergreen political gimmicks that can consume almost as much time in a political campaign as shredding documents. Campaign staffers collect these things as if they were scalps in a 19th century war. From other politicians. From celebrities. From newspaper boards, as if anyone follows editorial page endorsements anymore. These endorsements are then trotted out one by one in staged events designed to elicit free media attention on the assumption that some voters might possibly be swayed positively.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By Joshua Drobnyk
Rep. Joe Sestak needs a comb. His wavy, graying hair has been through a hectic morning, and the Pennsylvania Democrat is racing toward his third interview of the day, this time with ABC News. "Nobody under 40 carries a comb," he says. "See, watch this." Sestak, 57, looks at one of the young aides rushing ahead of him up an escalator in the Capitol Visitor Center: "Do you have a comb?" The staffer answers nervously: "No, sir." Primped or not, Sestak's life as a Senate candidate is a constant scramble to get his face on the air or his words in print, a frantic push to paint a portrait of himself for state voters -- and anyone else with the time to listen -- as he fights to get noticed.
NEWS
November 2, 2010 | By Michael A. Memoli, Tribune Washington Bureau
Former Congressman Pat Toomey has defeated Democrat Rep. Joe Sestak in Pennsylvania's Senate race, reclaiming the seat for Republicans 19 months after incumbent Arlen Specter abandoned the party. Toomey nearly unseated Specter in a 2004 primary and looked to challenge the five-term incumbent again this year. Faced with a rematch that looked more difficult, and after a lobbying campaign led by Vice President Joe Biden, Specter decided in late April 2009 to seek reelection as a Democrat.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Locked in a close race for the seat representing Pennsylvania in the U.S. Senate, Republican Pat Toomey on Sunday insisted that he is no Christine O’Donnell. O’Donnell, the GOP senatorial candidate in neighboring Delaware, is a “tea party” movement favorite, whose conservative positions allowed her to defeat an establishment Republican for the senatorial nomination. Her campaign in the general election has been become bogged down in a variety of issues, including her campaign ad explaining that she is not really a witch.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
When it comes to discussing the man who is running to replace him, Pennsylvania Sen. Arlen Specter would prefer the aptly named game of squash. Specter, 80, was among those who greeted President Obama on Monday when the president arrived in Philadelphia to campaign for Joe Sestak, who defeated Specter in the Democratic primary. The White House had strongly backed Specter, who converted to the Democratic Party last year, helping it to control the Senate where he had served as a top Republican since 1980.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2010 | Andrew Malcolm
Endorsements. One of those evergreen political gimmicks that can consume almost as much time in a political campaign as shredding documents. Campaign staffers collect these things as if they were scalps in a 19th century war. From other politicians. From celebrities. From newspaper boards, as if anyone follows editorial page endorsements anymore. These endorsements are then trotted out one by one in staged events designed to elicit free media attention on the assumption that some voters might possibly be swayed positively.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama White House enlisted former President Clinton to push a Democratic candidate out of a primary campaign by offering an appointment to a prestigious federal board as an inducement, according to an internal White House investigation whose findings were released Friday. White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, a top aide to Clinton in the 1990s, used the former president as a go-between in the unsuccessful attempt to clear the field for Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.), the report showed.
OPINION
May 27, 2010
It's no secret that the Obama administration wanted Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.) to drop his primary challenge to Republican-turned-Democrat Sen. Arlen Specter. But did President Obama's representatives try to entice Sestak into leaving the race by promising him a job? It's a simple question, and one that Sestak already has answered in the affirmative, but the administration continues to treat the issue as much ado about nothing. Actually, it's much ado about something. Yes, political factors often influence appointments in unsavory ways — witness the practice of awarding ambassadorships to campaign contributors.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas, Tribune Washington Bureau
The Obama White House enlisted former President Clinton to push a Democratic candidate out of a primary campaign by offering an appointment to a prestigious federal board as an inducement, according to an internal White House investigation whose findings were released Friday. White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, a top aide to Clinton in the 1990s, used the former president as a go-between in the unsuccessful attempt to clear the field for Sen. Arlen Specter (D-Pa.), the report showed.
NEWS
October 24, 2010 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
Locked in a close race for the seat representing Pennsylvania in the U.S. Senate, Republican Pat Toomey on Sunday insisted that he is no Christine O’Donnell. O’Donnell, the GOP senatorial candidate in neighboring Delaware, is a “tea party” movement favorite, whose conservative positions allowed her to defeat an establishment Republican for the senatorial nomination. Her campaign in the general election has been become bogged down in a variety of issues, including her campaign ad explaining that she is not really a witch.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2009 | By Joshua Drobnyk
Rep. Joe Sestak needs a comb. His wavy, graying hair has been through a hectic morning, and the Pennsylvania Democrat is racing toward his third interview of the day, this time with ABC News. "Nobody under 40 carries a comb," he says. "See, watch this." Sestak, 57, looks at one of the young aides rushing ahead of him up an escalator in the Capitol Visitor Center: "Do you have a comb?" The staffer answers nervously: "No, sir." Primped or not, Sestak's life as a Senate candidate is a constant scramble to get his face on the air or his words in print, a frantic push to paint a portrait of himself for state voters -- and anyone else with the time to listen -- as he fights to get noticed.
OPINION
August 6, 2009
Arlen Specter, the five-term senator from Pennsylvania and recently minted Democrat, is one of the great survivors of U.S. politics, and he may extend his lease on public office next year when he seeks reelection. But he shouldn't expect to win the nomination of his new party by default. Thanks to Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.), he won't. Sestak, a retired vice admiral, announced Tuesday that he will challenge Specter in the 2010 Democratic primary.
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