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Joe Shuster

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Shuster, who changed the dimension of comic books 54 years ago when he helped create the invincible Superman, yet had to watch through failing eyes as others reaped huge profits from the Man of Steel, is dead. A county coroner's spokesman said the artist was 78 and had died Thursday at his West Los Angeles home of congestive heart failure and hypertension.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
He's a bird, he's a plane... He's our savior? With "Man of Steel" grossing more than $125 million since it opened on Thursday, there has been much talk about the deeper meanings behind the epic blockbuster. Those intent on looking can find similarities between Jesus and Superman, from the character's willingness to sacrifice himself for the people of Earth to the ghost vision of his father Jor-El (Russell Crowe) that provides Superman guidance when he is lost. Warner Bros. is happy for moviegoers to make that connection, so much so the studio is providing an online resource guide to pastors who want to teach the positive themes of the movie to their congregants.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Warner Bros. has filed a series of explosive allegations against its longtime legal nemesis as a key decision looms that could affect its ownership of Superman. The Burbank studio's DC Comics unit said in a legal filing Wednesday in Los Angeles federal court that attorney Marc Toberoff, who has represented the heirs of Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in their eight-year fight to regain control of the Man of Steel character, has engaged in "willful concealment of evidence.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Superman won't be going up, up, and away from Warner Bros. In a crucial legal victory for the Burbank studio, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday denied an effort by the heirs of Superman co-creator Joseph Shuster to reclaim their 50% interest in the world's most famous superhero. Superman is one of Warner's most valuable characters, having generated more than $500 million at the domestic box office with five films and billions of dollars more from television series such as “Smallville,” toys and games, and 74 years' worth of comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 17, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
He's a bird, he's a plane... He's our savior? With "Man of Steel" grossing more than $125 million since it opened on Thursday, there has been much talk about the deeper meanings behind the epic blockbuster. Those intent on looking can find similarities between Jesus and Superman, from the character's willingness to sacrifice himself for the people of Earth to the ghost vision of his father Jor-El (Russell Crowe) that provides Superman guidance when he is lost. Warner Bros. is happy for moviegoers to make that connection, so much so the studio is providing an online resource guide to pastors who want to teach the positive themes of the movie to their congregants.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Superman won't be going up, up, and away from Warner Bros. In a crucial legal victory for the Burbank studio, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Wednesday denied an effort by the heirs of Superman co-creator Joseph Shuster to reclaim their 50% interest in the world's most famous superhero. Superman is one of Warner's most valuable characters, having generated more than $500 million at the domestic box office with five films and billions of dollars more from television series such as “Smallville,” toys and games, and 74 years' worth of comic books.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2009 | Carolyn Kellogg
Joe Shuster drew Superman in the 1930s, which should have made him invincible. But after he and writer Jerry Siegel got into a legal tie-up with DC Comics over rights to the character in the 1940s (DC won), he moved on to other things. One of those things, which he kept quiet, was a magazine called Nights of Horror. The salacious fictional crime booklet launched in 1954 and ran for 16 issues -- with illustrations by Shuster. These are now collected in the book "Secret Identity: The Fetish Art of Superman's Co-Creator Joe Shuster" by Craig Yoe. Nights of Horror was a plain-wrap kind of a periodical, one destined to run afoul of 1950s censors.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1986 | Jonathon Miller
Has the fabled private sci-fi memorabilia collection of Forrest J. Ackerman--housed in his Los Feliz estate--found a home away from home in Cleveland? Cleveland's nonprofit Neverending Battle (NEB) is negotiating for Ackerman's 300,000-piece collection--first editions, posters, a replica of the "robotrix" from "Metropolis," the mask for "The Creature From the Black Lagoon," etc.--once sought by the City of Los Angeles and the Queen Mary.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
DC Comics' superheroes can finally team up on the big screen following yesterday's legal victory for Warner Bros. in its long-running fight over the rights to Superman. The studio is expected to accelerate development of a planned "Justice League" movie that would join Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman and other characters, according to a knowledgeable person not authorized to discuss the matter publicly. Warner hopes to shoot the film next year and release it in the summer of 2015.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2008 | Arthur Max, Associated Press
AMSTERDAM -- When Abie the Agent talked about middle-class life in America or the war -- World War I, that is -- he spoke with a Yiddish accent. Created in 1914 by Harry Hershfield, the immigrant car salesman was the first Jewish comic book character to be syndicated, and he brought a touch of shtetl humor -- traditional Jewish folk humor -- to the newspaper funny pages. "Oy gewalt," he would lament. "It ain't the principle," he told an overcharging waiter in one oft-quoted line.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2012 | By Ben Fritz
Warner Bros. has filed a series of explosive allegations against its longtime legal nemesis as a key decision looms that could affect its ownership of Superman. The Burbank studio's DC Comics unit said in a legal filing Wednesday in Los Angeles federal court that attorney Marc Toberoff, who has represented the heirs of Superman creators Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster in their eight-year fight to regain control of the Man of Steel character, has engaged in "willful concealment of evidence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1992 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Shuster, who changed the dimension of comic books 54 years ago when he helped create the invincible Superman, yet had to watch through failing eyes as others reaped huge profits from the Man of Steel, is dead. A county coroner's spokesman said the artist was 78 and had died Thursday at his West Los Angeles home of congestive heart failure and hypertension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Joanne Siegel, who played a role in the creation of the Superman saga in the 1930s as Joe Shuster's teenage artist's model for Lois Lane and later married the Man of Steel's co-creator, writer Jerry Siegel, has died. She was 93. Siegel, a longtime resident of Marina del Rey who successfully fought a long legal battle to regain her late husband's copyrights to Superman and related characters, died Saturday at St. John's Health Center in Santa Monica, said her daughter, Laura Siegel Larson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 2006 | From Newsday
For most illustrators, creating even one iconic character is a dream come true. Martin Nodell, however, helped invent two: the superhero Green Lantern and the Pillsbury Doughboy. Nodell, one of the few surviving artists from the Golden Age of comic books, died Saturday at a nursing home in Wisconsin after a brief illness. He was 91. It was a subway ride in Manhattan that inspired Green Lantern.
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