Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoe Slovo
IN THE NEWS

Joe Slovo

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Slovo, the firebrand Communist Party chief and defiant guerrilla commander who later became a guiding force for moderation and multiracial democracy in South Africa, died today after a long battle with bone-marrow cancer. He was 68. During the harsh apartheid years, probably no white man was as widely revered in black townships, or as fiercely hated by white authorities. No other white was as prominent in the black liberation movement that ultimately won power in South Africa.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
HER first screenplay was about her mother; her latest, "Catch a Fire," was suggested by her father. Shawn Slovo's family history is inextricably linked to the modern history of her homeland, South Africa, and her writing gives voice to it. Slovo's parents were lifelong activists in the fight against apartheid. Her mother, Ruth First, was killed in 1982 by a letter bomb sent by members of the South African military. Her father, Joe Slovo, was a leader in the military wing of the African National Congress.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks now, Joe Slovo has traveled white South Africa wrapped in his rumpled sports coat and fading ideology. He's been both heckled and cheered, sometimes in the same room. And, always, he's been pummeled with tough questions. "Does my mother need to worry about her Georgian furniture being nationalized?" a caller to a local radio talk show asked him the other day. "Not at all," Slovo replied, chuckling. "I don't particularly like Georgian furniture, by the way."
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
President Nelson Mandela was among thousands of mourners who filed past the flag-draped coffin of Joe Slovo in a state funeral Sunday for the African National Congress and Communist Party leader. The Lithuanian-born Slovo, who died of cancer Jan. 6 at the age of 68, lived to see his dream of democracy come true with South Africa's historic all-race elections last April.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | United Press International
President Frederik W. de Klerk asked black leader Nelson Mandela to drop Communist leader Joe Slovo from his team for talks with Pretoria after the state accused Communists in the African National Congress of plotting violence, the ANC said Friday. The ANC also said De Klerk and Mandela, the ANC's deputy president, will meet again Aug. 1 after indecisive talks Thursday on the mass arrests of Communists in the ANC.
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | From United Press International
The editor of an Afrikaans language newspapar was given a suspended jail term Wednesday for printing the opinions of a leading figure in the outlawed African National Congress. The court convicted Max du Preez, 37, editor of Vrye Weekblad (Free Weekly), under the Internal Security Act for publishing comments by Joe Slovo, general secretary of the South African Communist Party and executive member of the ANC. 'Listed Person' Slovo is a "listed" person who may not be legally quoted in the South African press.
BOOKS
November 9, 1986
I would like to point out that in Jonathan Kirsch's review of two paperback books on Nelson Mandela (The Book Review, Oct. 5), there are certain misstatements that should not be permitted to go unchallenged. The opening sentence of the review: "By the brutal if simple expedient of imprisoning him, the government of South Africa has succeeded in cutting off Nelson Mandela from his family, his people, his work, his leadership of the South African Liberation movement." Because South Africa is "fair game" for almost any form of condemnation in the media, it is rare for the criticism to be subjected to the constraints of objectivity.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
President Nelson Mandela was among thousands of mourners who filed past the flag-draped coffin of Joe Slovo in a state funeral Sunday for the African National Congress and Communist Party leader. The Lithuanian-born Slovo, who died of cancer Jan. 6 at the age of 68, lived to see his dream of democracy come true with South Africa's historic all-race elections last April.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking exiled leaders of the African National Congress, speaking directly to South Africans for the first time in three decades, told a rally here Sunday that this week's talks with the government signal the beginning of the end of "the misery of apartheid." "South Africa shall never be the same again," ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo told about 10,000 supporters gathered on a soggy sports field on a cold, blustery day. "Ours is a society in transition to a new order."
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the red flag beating a retreat worldwide, the South African Communist Party was relaunched at a thunderous mass rally here Sunday, ending 40 years as an outlaw and unmasking a leadership corps that includes influential figures in the African National Congress. "The South African Communist Party is reborn. We live, once again, in the sun," declared General Secretary Joe Slovo.
NEWS
January 6, 1995 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Slovo, the firebrand Communist Party chief and defiant guerrilla commander who later became a guiding force for moderation and multiracial democracy in South Africa, died today after a long battle with bone-marrow cancer. He was 68. During the harsh apartheid years, probably no white man was as widely revered in black townships, or as fiercely hated by white authorities. No other white was as prominent in the black liberation movement that ultimately won power in South Africa.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks now, Joe Slovo has traveled white South Africa wrapped in his rumpled sports coat and fading ideology. He's been both heckled and cheered, sometimes in the same room. And, always, he's been pummeled with tough questions. "Does my mother need to worry about her Georgian furniture being nationalized?" a caller to a local radio talk show asked him the other day. "Not at all," Slovo replied, chuckling. "I don't particularly like Georgian furniture, by the way."
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the red flag beating a retreat worldwide, the South African Communist Party was relaunched at a thunderous mass rally here Sunday, ending 40 years as an outlaw and unmasking a leadership corps that includes influential figures in the African National Congress. "The South African Communist Party is reborn. We live, once again, in the sun," declared General Secretary Joe Slovo.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | United Press International
President Frederik W. de Klerk asked black leader Nelson Mandela to drop Communist leader Joe Slovo from his team for talks with Pretoria after the state accused Communists in the African National Congress of plotting violence, the ANC said Friday. The ANC also said De Klerk and Mandela, the ANC's deputy president, will meet again Aug. 1 after indecisive talks Thursday on the mass arrests of Communists in the ANC.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The highest-ranking exiled leaders of the African National Congress, speaking directly to South Africans for the first time in three decades, told a rally here Sunday that this week's talks with the government signal the beginning of the end of "the misery of apartheid." "South Africa shall never be the same again," ANC Secretary General Alfred Nzo told about 10,000 supporters gathered on a soggy sports field on a cold, blustery day. "Ours is a society in transition to a new order."
NEWS
June 22, 1989 | From United Press International
The editor of an Afrikaans language newspapar was given a suspended jail term Wednesday for printing the opinions of a leading figure in the outlawed African National Congress. The court convicted Max du Preez, 37, editor of Vrye Weekblad (Free Weekly), under the Internal Security Act for publishing comments by Joe Slovo, general secretary of the South African Communist Party and executive member of the ANC. 'Listed Person' Slovo is a "listed" person who may not be legally quoted in the South African press.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Joe Slovo is the man most feared by white South Africans, the man whose calls for greater "revolutionary violence" seem intended to plunge the country into chaos, the man whose dreams of a Communist South Africa give them nightmares.
NEWS
November 22, 2006 | Lisa Rosen, Special to The Times
HER first screenplay was about her mother; her latest, "Catch a Fire," was suggested by her father. Shawn Slovo's family history is inextricably linked to the modern history of her homeland, South Africa, and her writing gives voice to it. Slovo's parents were lifelong activists in the fight against apartheid. Her mother, Ruth First, was killed in 1982 by a letter bomb sent by members of the South African military. Her father, Joe Slovo, was a leader in the military wing of the African National Congress.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Joe Slovo is the man most feared by white South Africans, the man whose calls for greater "revolutionary violence" seem intended to plunge the country into chaos, the man whose dreams of a Communist South Africa give them nightmares.
BOOKS
November 9, 1986
I would like to point out that in Jonathan Kirsch's review of two paperback books on Nelson Mandela (The Book Review, Oct. 5), there are certain misstatements that should not be permitted to go unchallenged. The opening sentence of the review: "By the brutal if simple expedient of imprisoning him, the government of South Africa has succeeded in cutting off Nelson Mandela from his family, his people, his work, his leadership of the South African Liberation movement." Because South Africa is "fair game" for almost any form of condemnation in the media, it is rare for the criticism to be subjected to the constraints of objectivity.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|