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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year's euphemism for "obscene" -- "Lacking in artistic quality"--is clever, but ultimately it is as subjective and legally vague as was last year's "indecent." -- L.A. visual artist Joe Smoke, in a letter to the National Endowment for the Arts Joe Smoke is the latest artist to taste the highs and lows of controversy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This year's euphemism for "obscene" -- "Lacking in artistic quality"--is clever, but ultimately it is as subjective and legally vague as was last year's "indecent." -- L.A. visual artist Joe Smoke, in a letter to the National Endowment for the Arts Joe Smoke is the latest artist to taste the highs and lows of controversy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
New Leader: Controversial Los Angeles artist Joe Smoke, 27, took over Monday as executive director of Los Angeles Center for Photographic Studies, replacing Suzy Kerr who is leaving the downtown organization to return to her native England. "I have great hopes to expand our membership and to continue providing L.A. and Southern California with new and innovative photographic exhibitions," said Smoke, who organized an exhibition on Women and AIDS for the organization in 1991.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2008 | Mike Boehm
The Summer Olympics are over, but L.A. arts organizations could be in a sprinter's stance Sept. 23, when the starter's gun will sound in a competition for $935,000 in federal arts-grant money. The winners will stamp an Angeleno imprint on next year's annual International Book Fair in Guadalajara. The fair, billed as the world's largest event for Spanish-language publishers, invites a country, state or region to create and program a special pavilion as guest of honor. L.A. is the first municipality ever chosen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Endowment for the Arts announced a $30-million round of grants Saturday, including $15,000 to two avant garde arts groups whose applications for other funds were recently denied because of explicitly sexual works the Endowment said lacked "artistic merit."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The exhibition is called "Underexposed." The place is the Municipal Art Gallery in Barnsdall Park. The title is a pun. It refers to about 80 artists and the materials with which they ply their trade. The core technique is art's old stepchild, photography now extended into the even more artistically esoteric areas of video, video installation, digital imagery and performance art. Makers do everything from little peep shows to assemblage in the manner of Joseph Cornell.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1992 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two contemporary arts organizations whose applications for National Endowment for the Arts government grants were rejected Friday charge that the denial was based on overtly sexual content, rather than artistic value. Highways, a Santa Monica performance space that presents avant-garde artists, was turned down for a $5,000 grant in the visual-arts category; Franklin Furnace, a Manhattan, N.Y., alternative arts space was rejected for a $25,000 grant application in the same category.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
The current exhibition at Cal State L.A.'s Fine Arts Gallery poses the old question of whether artists can serve two masters. Titled "Public Image/Private Focus," it was organized by CSULA photography professor Jack Butler. He purposefully included six local camera workers who are also deeply immersed in themes of ethnic, racial or gender identity. They consciously take time from their own work to do community service, teaching, volunteering and so forth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Halfway through an inventory of its scattered collection, the city of Los Angeles can't find 358 works of art that may be worth nearly $400,000 and has asked police to investigate, officials said Monday. The missing artwork ranges from a dramatic 1946 oil painting of the Navy cruiser Los Angeles by Arthur Beaumont worth up to $150,000, to a 1936 painting by Guy Morton titled "Santa Monica Canyon" worth an estimated $1,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 2000 | AGUSTIN GURZA
Welcome to the First Annual Southern California Scavenger Hunt for Heroic Sculpture of Historic Figures. The rules are simple, but winning won't be easy. Classic statues are hard to come by these days. For those who care to play, however, the payoff will be well worth it. The object is to locate sculptures memorializing great people in public spaces, but not churches or museums. Stumped already? Well, that's understandable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2001 | PATRICK McGREEVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Halfway through an inventory of its scattered collection, the city of Los Angeles can't find 358 works of art that may be worth nearly $400,000 and has asked police to investigate, officials said Monday. The missing artworks range from a dramatic 1946 Arthur Beaumont oil painting of the naval cruiser Los Angeles that may be worth up to $150,000, to a 1936 painting by Guy Morton titled "Santa Monica Canyon" and worth about $1,000.
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