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Joe Spano

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY
Joe Spano, best known as Lt. Henry Goldblum of "Hill Street Blues," will lead the cast of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Chorus of Disapproval," the opening production of South Coast Repertory's 1989-90 season. The British comedy, to be directed by SCR's Producing Artistic Director David Emmes, will run on the SCR Mainstage from Sept. 8 to Oct. 12, with discount-priced preview performances beginning Sept. 1.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2009 | David Ng
The growling "Hey!" that Martha uses to summon her husband, George, in the Rubicon Theatre Company's production of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is a guttural noise choked with savagery and a thick smoker's phlegm. An emasculating sound if ever one existed, her bark is the recurring audio motif of this rousing revival, which brings an invigorating if sometimes strained animalism to Edward Albee's classic vivisection of WASP marriage. Joe Spano and Karyl Lynn Burns play the unhappily wed academic couple who spend one very long night (and part of the next morning)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Joe Spano was recalling how the current Gnu Theatre production of David Mamet's "American Buffalo," in which he plays a nearly witless street tough named Teach, was directly related to a Mamet-written episode of "Hill Street Blues" (he played Lt. Henry Goldblume in the seven-year series). It was a story of the hazards of the stage trade. "David's 'Hill Street' script was the best one in seven years for me," he began. "It was my largest part, my most emotionally wide-ranging episode.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Spano understands the importance of mentors. The Emmy Award-winning actor has had several during a career in which he's been both obscure and renowned. "I've had a number of people that have helped and given me advice, from my college days on up," said Spano, who's probably best known as the sensitive, forever-troubled Lt. Henry Goldblume on "Hill Street Blues." "There was the encouragement I received while at (UC) Berkeley (studying drama) and then the more practical stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Spano understands the importance of mentors. The Emmy Award-winning actor has had several during a career in which he's been both obscure and renowned. "I've had a number of people that have helped and given me advice, from my college days on up," said Spano, who's probably best known as the sensitive, forever-troubled Lt. Henry Goldblume on "Hill Street Blues." "There was the encouragement I received while at (UC) Berkeley (studying drama) and then the more practical stuff.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2009 | David Ng
The growling "Hey!" that Martha uses to summon her husband, George, in the Rubicon Theatre Company's production of "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" is a guttural noise choked with savagery and a thick smoker's phlegm. An emasculating sound if ever one existed, her bark is the recurring audio motif of this rousing revival, which brings an invigorating if sometimes strained animalism to Edward Albee's classic vivisection of WASP marriage. Joe Spano and Karyl Lynn Burns play the unhappily wed academic couple who spend one very long night (and part of the next morning)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1997
"Renewing the Faith," the Virginia Avenue Project's production of comic plays by young writers, will be performed and directed by stage and theater professionals Richard Coca, Leigh Curran, Tom Kellogg, Roma Maffia, Geoffrey Rivas, Ian Ruskin, Joe Spano and others at Barnsdall Art Park's Gallery Theatre in Hollywood on Friday at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday at 3 and 7:30 p.m. Admission is free. Information: (310) 330-8860.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1991
The J. Paul Getty Museum and KCRW (89.9 FM) are hosting the first West Coast performances of "Selected Shorts: A Celebration of the Short Story," Oct. 25-27 in the museum's auditorium. Featured in the four performances will be a total of 14 classic and contemporary readings of short fiction works, produced by the New York performing arts center Symphony Space.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1993 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Yet another true-life tragedy feeds TV's seemingly insatiable desire for disaster dramas, but surprise: NBC's "The Flood: Who Will Save Our Children?" (at 9 p.m. Sunday on Channels 4, 36 and 39), based on a lethal 1987 flash-flood in Texas that trapped two busloads of teens returning from Bible camp, is a cut above most.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1989 | MARK I. PINSKY
Joe Spano, best known as Lt. Henry Goldblum of "Hill Street Blues," will lead the cast of Alan Ayckbourn's "A Chorus of Disapproval," the opening production of South Coast Repertory's 1989-90 season. The British comedy, to be directed by SCR's Producing Artistic Director David Emmes, will run on the SCR Mainstage from Sept. 8 to Oct. 12, with discount-priced preview performances beginning Sept. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Joe Spano was recalling how the current Gnu Theatre production of David Mamet's "American Buffalo," in which he plays a nearly witless street tough named Teach, was directly related to a Mamet-written episode of "Hill Street Blues" (he played Lt. Henry Goldblume in the seven-year series). It was a story of the hazards of the stage trade. "David's 'Hill Street' script was the best one in seven years for me," he began. "It was my largest part, my most emotionally wide-ranging episode.
NEWS
May 15, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
They could rename this year's Pacific Playwrights Festival at South Coast Repertory the Pulitzer Playwrights Festival. And the Pulitzer cachet appears to be enhanced by some notable Hollywood names participating in the readings at the Costa Mesa theater. This year's Pulitzer winner for drama, "Anna in the Tropics" by Nilo Cruz, will receive a staged reading, with Jimmy Smits and Tony Plana. South Coast will produce the West Coast premiere in October.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1996
KCRW-FM (89.9) kicks off the new year with a marathon presentation of "Selected Shorts at the Getty," recorded readings of classic and contemporary short stories and other works by stage and screen actors, on Wednesday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Schedule: 9-10:30 a.m.: "A Continuity of Parks," by Julio Cortazar, read by Alan Rachins; "The Summer of the Beautiful White Horse," by William Saroyan, read by Stephen Lang; "The Man Who Liked Dickens," by Evelyn Waugh, read by Leonard Nimoy. 10:30 a.m.
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