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Joe Torry

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Torry says he's no slouch, but then he's also nothing like the appearance-obsessed postal worker he plays in the new John Singleton movie, "Poetic Justice." Preening and strutting, Torry plays Chicago, a man who can talk endlessly about his wardrobe and is rarely seen without hairbrush in hand. "I know people like that, but that's like 180 degrees from who I am," Torry said Wednesday from his home in Los Angeles. "I keep pretty groomed in real life, but not like that."
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NEWS
August 7, 1994 | CHRIS RUBIN, Chris Rubin is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer
The new host of HBO's "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam" isn't out to remake the show, just move it forward. " 'Comedy Jam' won't change much," says Joe Torry. "It's just a continuation, hipper, a new flavor. And," Torry adds with a laugh, "better looking." "Def Comedy Jam" producer Russell Simmons caught Torry's act in a comedy club and promised him a spot based on the strength of that performance.
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NEWS
August 7, 1994 | CHRIS RUBIN, Chris Rubin is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer
The new host of HBO's "Russell Simmons' Def Comedy Jam" isn't out to remake the show, just move it forward. " 'Comedy Jam' won't change much," says Joe Torry. "It's just a continuation, hipper, a new flavor. And," Torry adds with a laugh, "better looking." "Def Comedy Jam" producer Russell Simmons caught Torry's act in a comedy club and promised him a spot based on the strength of that performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Torry says he's no slouch, but then he's also nothing like the appearanceobsessed postal worker he plays in the new John Singleton movie, "Poetic Justice." Preening and strutting, Torry plays Chicago, a man who can talk endlessly about his wardrobe and is rarely seen without hairbrush in hand. "I know people like that, but that's like 180 degrees from who I am," Torry said. "I keep pretty groomed in real life, but not like that."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Torry says he's no slouch, but then he's also nothing like the appearanceobsessed postal worker he plays in the new John Singleton movie, "Poetic Justice." Preening and strutting, Torry plays Chicago, a man who can talk endlessly about his wardrobe and is rarely seen without hairbrush in hand. "I know people like that, but that's like 180 degrees from who I am," Torry said. "I keep pretty groomed in real life, but not like that."
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | Kevin Thomas
With this high-energy, scabrously funny 1995 film, young African American writer-director Rusty Cundieff recharges the old horror anthology. "Tales From the Hood" is operatic, fast-moving, action-filled and often hilarious. Clarence Williams III (pictured) serves as the film's key figure and narrator, when his elegant funeral parlor is invaded by three youthful drug dealers (Joe Torry, De'Aundre Bonds and Samuel Monroe Jr.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 1995 | JAMES E. FOWLER
LAUGHING IN THE HOOD Def Comedy Jam All-Stars make their way to the Universal Amphitheater this Wednesday night. With its in-your-face style, Russell Simmons' "Def Comedy Jam" on Home Box Office is one of the most popular comedy shows in the '90s. In rap lingo, def means excellent. Although all the comics are African American and much of the material is filled with references unfamiliar to mainstream audiences, HBO research reveals that two-thirds of the show's audience is not black.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1997 | JOHN ANDERSON, FOR THE TIMES
By burlesquing rap culture almost to the point of absurdity, the talented young writer-director-actor Rusty Cundieff made the mockumentary "Fear of a Black Hat" into one of the funnier movies of recent years. Cundieff again proves himself adept with the new romantic comedy "Sprung," which is genre-busting without being a pretentious pain.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1997 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly six years after exploding onto the scene and launching the careers of dozens of black comics, HBO's raunchy and wildly successful "Def Comedy Jam" continues to be a force. The show, created by rap mogul Russell Simmons, has served as an incubator for the careers of young black comedians.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 2000
ANYTIME Sundays: Workaholic Jay Leno continues appearing virtually every Sunday night at the Comedy and Magic Club in Hermosa Beach. Thursdays: Drew Carey, Ryan Stiles, Colin Mochrie, Wayne Brady and Greg Proops keep their improv act sharp and try routines that may turn up on their ABC-TV series, "Whose Line Is It Anyway?" Thursdays at the Hollywood Improv. Fridays, beginning Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Torry says he's no slouch, but then he's also nothing like the appearance-obsessed postal worker he plays in the new John Singleton movie, "Poetic Justice." Preening and strutting, Torry plays Chicago, a man who can talk endlessly about his wardrobe and is rarely seen without hairbrush in hand. "I know people like that, but that's like 180 degrees from who I am," Torry said Wednesday from his home in Los Angeles. "I keep pretty groomed in real life, but not like that."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
How do you follow a phenomenon? More to the point, if you're writer-director John Singleton and your strongly felt debut film, "Boyz N the Hood," not only made money but made you the youngest person (as well as the first African-American) ever nominated for the best director Oscar, what do you do for film No. 2? Variants of that difficulty have preyed on every Hollywood boy wonder from Orson Welles to Steven Soderberg.
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