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Joe Turner

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
Sometimes a performance is so finely adept that you forget the actor and see only the character. The dancer is inseparable from the dance, to borrow Yeats' timeless formulation. Glynn Turman's portrayal of Bynum in the stunning Mark Taper Forum revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone” is such a performance. Playing an older boardinghouse resident with clairvoyant vision and a penchant for old country magic, Turman makes this eccentric character seem so natural that it's as if he wandered into the theater from an open door backstage.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By David Ng
A new production of the Phillip Hayes Dean play "Paul Robeson" that was scheduled to open Friday in Los Angeles has been postponed due to an injury sustained by actor Keith David. The play, a production by the Ebony Repertory Theatre at the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center, had its first preview performance on Wednesday. All subsequent performances have been put on hold until David recovers, according to the company. The injury involves swelling to the actor's knee, according to Wren T. Brown, the Ebony's founder and producer.
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NEWS
July 23, 1990
American jazz pianist and occasional singer Joe Turner, a longtime resident of France and in the 1960s a fixture at Paris' La Calvados club, died Saturday in Paris. Reuters news agency said he was 82 but did not disclose a cause of death. Turner, who in his career accompanied such jazz stars as Louis Armstrong and Benny Carter, was born in Baltimore but moved to Europe after World War II where he had toured earlier with singer Adelaide Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
Sometimes a performance is so finely adept that you forget the actor and see only the character. The dancer is inseparable from the dance, to borrow Yeats' timeless formulation. Glynn Turman's portrayal of Bynum in the stunning Mark Taper Forum revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone” is such a performance. Playing an older boardinghouse resident with clairvoyant vision and a penchant for old country magic, Turman makes this eccentric character seem so natural that it's as if he wandered into the theater from an open door backstage.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Among the pleasures of seeing an August Wilson play, it's often said, is just listening to the people talk. As Los Angeles Times theater critic Charles McNulty has noted, Wilson stocks his scripts with "natural raconteurs" and lets them soar in "verbal arias" full of earthy poetry. In that sense, a recent dinner break interview with Keith David, John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman was more or less an extension of what they'd been doing in rehearsals for the Mark Taper Forum's revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The setting for August Wilson's magnificent "Joe Turner's Come and Gone" is a boardinghouse in 1911 Pittsburgh, but the spiritual location is a crossroads between the ghostly past and the forbidding future, slavery and freedom, despair and hope. The great migration from the sharecropping South to the industrialized North is underway, and the characters of this crushingly beautiful play have no choice but to reassess the two strands of their African American identities. The change promised by a new century may be slow and incomplete, but it has come and it is unstoppable.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
If August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," which opened over the weekend at the Los Angeles Theatre Center, is about anything, it is about African-American cultural loss, greater than any other for having been so entirely involuntary. It is rare to find a playwright such as Wilson who, play after play, seems to deepen and broaden his themes. But how far can Wilson bend the rules of dramaturgy? In "Joe Turner," he marries an absence of attention to detail and outward realism with elements of myth and passion.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
It's 3:30 in the afternoon, but it feels like the middle of the night to Roscoe Lee Browne. His body clock is used to going to work at 8 p.m., taking to the stage as the elderly soothsayer Bynum in August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone" (at the Los Angeles Theatre Center through June 18). But now, because he's performing for local schoolchildren at special noontime performances, he's on double duty, turning in back-to-back performances of the almost 3 1/2-hour play. What makes it a lot more bearable is that this is a play Browne adores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1985 | T. W. McGARRY, Times Staff Writer
Big Joe Turner, a 300-pound legend who learned to sing the blues as a Kansas City junkman and transformed decades of urban black music into the roots of rock 'n' roll, died Sunday at the age of 74. Known as both "the last of the blues shouters" and "the grandfather of rock 'n' roll," Turner died after a heart attack at Daniel Freeman Hospital in Inglewood after several years of failing health caused by diabetes, a hospital spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Big Joe Turner's powerful vocals on the original version of "Shake, Rattle & Roll" propelled the late blues shouter into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, but that honor didn't help blues pilgrim Akio Yamanaka last year. When Yamanaka, the editor of the Tokyo-based blues magazine Juke, went to Roosevelt Cemetery in Gardena to pay homage to Turner, who died of a heart attack in 1985, he found that the blues giant's grave was unmarked.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The setting for August Wilson's magnificent "Joe Turner's Come and Gone" is a boardinghouse in 1911 Pittsburgh, but the spiritual location is a crossroads between the ghostly past and the forbidding future, slavery and freedom, despair and hope. The great migration from the sharecropping South to the industrialized North is underway, and the characters of this crushingly beautiful play have no choice but to reassess the two strands of their African American identities. The change promised by a new century may be slow and incomplete, but it has come and it is unstoppable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
Among the pleasures of seeing an August Wilson play, it's often said, is just listening to the people talk. As Los Angeles Times theater critic Charles McNulty has noted, Wilson stocks his scripts with "natural raconteurs" and lets them soar in "verbal arias" full of earthy poetry. In that sense, a recent dinner break interview with Keith David, John Douglas Thompson and Glynn Turman was more or less an extension of what they'd been doing in rehearsals for the Mark Taper Forum's revival of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
An American classic staged by a veteran actor, a musical farce to delight Anglophiles, and a reworking of a landmark 19th century drama are just a few of the more promising theater offerings this season. Predicting which will become a hit is always a crapshoot. For those placing bets, the Old Globe's offering has better than even odds, but on paper all of these shows are worth a gamble. 'A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder' In this musical comedy written by Robert L. Freedman and Steven Lutvak, the outcast of the aristocratic D'Ysquith family learns that he's ninth in line to inherit a dukedom, meaning he's a measly eight murders away from easy street.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 2013 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Phylicia Rashad, who became a TV star 30 years ago as Clair Huxtable on NBC's "The Cosby Show," is also a Tony Award-winning actress ("A Raisin in the Sun") and an acclaimed theater director. She is directing the Mark Taper Forum's production of August Wilson's "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," the playwright's second installment in his decade-by-decade exploration of African American life, which runs from April 24 through June 9. Rashad talked about directing "Joe Turner" on the phone from New York, where she was casting the play.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2010 | By Mike Boehm and David Ng
Bennett Bradley of Hollywood's Fountain Theatre won awards for directing and producing plays that burrowed deeply into the African American experience, but friends and colleagues remembered Monday that he savored and contributed to nearly all of the arts. Bradley, 59, was found stabbed to death early Saturday evening at his Mid-Wilshire apartment. Police are investigating Bradley's death as a robbery and murder. When he didn't show up to lead a 5 p.m. rehearsal of the Fountain's West Coast premiere of "The Ballad of Emmett Till," the show's stage manager went to his home and found his body, said Stephen Sachs, the company's co-artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 2009 | Jan Breslauer
Seated around a large table during the first week of rehearsal for "The Night Is a Child," director Sheldon Epps guides his actors' investigation of a scene between an American woman and the hotel owner she encounters in Brazil. He asks them about the differences between Boston and Brazil, the grayness versus the color, and the contrasts that these first scenes must embody. With a cast led by JoBeth Williams, Charles Randolph-Wright's "The Night is a Child" opens Friday in its West Coast premiere at the Pasadena Playhouse, where Epps is artistic director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1985 | JANET RAE-DUPREE, Times Staff Writer
With mournful rhythm and a lot of blues, the musical community of Los Angeles gathered Saturday for a tuneful farewell to Big Joe Turner, the "grandfather of rock 'n' roll." Turner, who died last Sunday of a heart attack at 74, "was a big man with a big voice that was as smooth as silk," said Rev. Dennis Woods, a former radio disc jockey turned preacher, at Turner's funeral in South Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | CHIORI SANTIAGO
When the going gets tough, Claude Purdy has coffee. Usually, the resident director at Minneapolis' Penumbra Theater crosses the street from his home to a neighbor's house where he shares a cup of that traditional stimulant for creative exchange. But this is no ordinary suburban coffee klatch; for the last 10 years his neighborhood confidant has been August Wilson, the playwright whose sagas of black America are on their way to becoming classics of theatrical literature.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2006 | F. Kathleen Foley, Special to The Times
The Fountain Theatre's production of "Joe Turner's Come and Gone," the third in the late August Wilson's 10-play, decade-by-decade cycle about the black experience in the 20th century, resonates as a fitting memorial to a genius whose distinctive voice was stilled too soon. "Turner" is set in Pittsburgh, as are all the plays in the cycle with the exception of "Ma Rainey's Black Bottom," which is set in Chicago.
OPINION
June 30, 2005
In the June 25 article "A Monumental War of Words," Joseph Turner, founder of Save Our State, makes it clear that "inflicting economic damage to the city of Baldwin Park" is his goal. He hopes to cost Baldwin Park so much money protecting his hate group from enraged counter-protesters that the city will tear down the monument to stay solvent. Why do police allow Save Our State's "protests," knowing that economic damage and blackmail are its stated goals? If they were spray-painting on the monument, they'd be arrested.
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