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Joe Williams

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999
As a No. 1 fan of Joe Williams, I will miss him very much (obituary, March 31). He could reach out to me, whether on records or in a concert. Never mind that I'm a jazz lover, Joe went beyond the scats and the riffs. The last time I saw him perform was about two years or so ago at Cerritos Performing Arts Center. The audience did not want to let him off the stage. Walking slowly, he returned for his last encore. He sat on a stool and sang the quiet ballad, "When Did You Leave Heaven?"
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SPORTS
March 26, 2002 | PETER YOON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Williams thought long and hard about what he wanted to accomplish in the wrestling season and figured he should aim high. He decided he would go for an undefeated season. A lofty goal for the 171-pound junior from Santa Ana Calvary Chapel High, but not high enough for his coaches. "They said I need to set my goals a bit higher," Williams said. "I was like 'What do you mean higher? I want to win all my matches.'
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One name has been added to the already impressive lineup for this year's Jazz at Drew Legacy Music Series, to be held Oct. 3-4 at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science in Los Angeles--that of singer Joe Williams. Williams is scheduled to sing with the Gerald Wilson Orchestra during Sunday's daylong event.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The death of Joe Williams last week deprives the jazz world--and the world in general--of one of its most musically masterful voices. More than that, it symbolizes the passing of a generation of artists that sustained the enormous creative energies of the '30s and '40s into the final years of the century. Williams was into his 30s when he had his first big hits--"Ev'ry Day I Have the Blues," "The Comeback," "Alright, Okay, You Win," among others--with the Count Basie Orchestra.
NEWS
March 31, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Williams, considered by many to be the finest jazz singer of his generation, died on a Las Vegas street after collapsing while apparently trying to walk home from a hospital. He was 80. Williams was found Monday afternoon a few blocks from his home after hospital personnel alerted police that he was missing. Williams' manager, John Levy, said the singer had been in the city's Sunrise Hospital for the last few days and was hospitalized earlier in Seattle because of breathing problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1985
"The Cosby Show," the highest rated series on television, is getting a new cast member. Famed jazz singer Joe Williams has joined the show in the recurring role of Grandpa Al, father of Clair Huxtable (Phylicia Ayers-Allen). Williams, who won a Grammy Award in 1984 as best jazz vocalist, will make his first appearance on the NBC series Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The death of Joe Williams last week deprives the jazz world--and the world in general--of one of its most musically masterful voices. More than that, it symbolizes the passing of a generation of artists that sustained the enormous creative energies of the '30s and '40s into the final years of the century. Williams was into his 30s when he had his first big hits--"Ev'ry Day I Have the Blues," "The Comeback," "Alright, Okay, You Win," among others--with the Count Basie Orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
"For the Love of Joe," a tribute to Joe Williams staged Wednesday in Artemus Ham Hall at UNLV, was the third in a series of events organized to help the Society of Singers toward its goal of establishing a retirement home for singers. Aside from two opening tunes with Henry Mancini conducting Dick Polumbi's house band, and a spectacular drum number by Louie Bellson, this was essentially a parade of singers--more than a dozen of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Celebrations ending in a zero tend to be momentous. When the zero is preceded by a large digit, the significance is accordingly multiplied. So it was last Monday when Joe Williams celebrated his 70th birthday. Determined to make this a night to remember, Williams' wife Jillean brought in the entire Count Basie Orchestra, with which he spent six crucial years of his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1989 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Memphis Slim wrote it. But the song "Everyday I Have the Blues" has been Joe Williams' since fans at Chicago's long-gone Club DeLisa began requesting it from the brassy-toned vocalist about 40 years ago. So how does he keep it sounding fresh after all these years? "It's the treatment," he answered in a phone conversation from his Las Vegas home earlier this week. "I'm with Miles Davis on this. I think the treatment of a song is the thing that interests me more than anything else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1999
As a No. 1 fan of Joe Williams, I will miss him very much (obituary, March 31). He could reach out to me, whether on records or in a concert. Never mind that I'm a jazz lover, Joe went beyond the scats and the riffs. The last time I saw him perform was about two years or so ago at Cerritos Performing Arts Center. The audience did not want to let him off the stage. Walking slowly, he returned for his last encore. He sat on a stool and sang the quiet ballad, "When Did You Leave Heaven?"
NEWS
March 31, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Williams, considered by many to be the finest jazz singer of his generation, died on a Las Vegas street after collapsing while apparently trying to walk home from a hospital. He was 80. Williams was found Monday afternoon a few blocks from his home after hospital personnel alerted police that he was missing. Williams' manager, John Levy, said the singer had been in the city's Sunrise Hospital for the last few days and was hospitalized earlier in Seattle because of breathing problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One name has been added to the already impressive lineup for this year's Jazz at Drew Legacy Music Series, to be held Oct. 3-4 at the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine & Science in Los Angeles--that of singer Joe Williams. Williams is scheduled to sing with the Gerald Wilson Orchestra during Sunday's daylong event.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1996 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Hollywood Bowl's last major jazz event of the season was--even before it began--a roller coaster of ups and downs. The initially scheduled program had all the makings of a celebration, with original headliner Mel Torme making his 20th consecutive annual appearance at the Bowl. But the stroke Torme suffered in early August removed him from the lineup, casting somewhat of a pall over the event. Matters took a decided upswing with the announcement that Joe Williams would replace Torme.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're no regular Joes. One, awarded three Grammys for his last two recordings, is arguably the jazz world's leading instrumentalist. The other has been its top blues and ballad singer for 40 years, ever since he joined the Count Basie Orchestra. When Joe Henderson and Joe Williams share the stage Friday at the Orange County Performing Arts Center, it will be much like a boxing card that features two heavyweight champions. It's no surprise that the two admire each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The star of the Joe Williams Salute at the Hollywood Bowl Wednesday night was--surprise!--Joe Williams. How could it have been otherwise? Even with a lineup that included Jon Hendricks, Nancy Wilson, Dianne Reeves and the Count Basie Orchestra, there was never any doubt that Williams, as soon as he stepped on stage, would rule the proceedings. Which is not to minimize the other artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
The teaming of Joe Williams and "The Tonight Show" Orchestra conducted by Doc Severinsen, presented Tuesday and Wednesday at Ambassador Auditorium in Pasadena, was an inspiration in at least two ways: It afforded the preeminent male singer of the jazz world a rare chance to be heard locally in a big-band setting, and it allowed the audience to hear in person a band whose appearances are so often confined to five-second playoffs at the end of a routine by a comic or animal trainer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
If the rest of the album were totally blank, it would still be an essential purchase on the strength of the title tune that opens it. Rarely has there been a more consummate blend of singer, arranger, song and lyric. The honors are shared by Williams, Robert Farnon with his opulent strings and woodwinds, Artie Butler and Phyllis Molinary. Credit also goes to producer John Snyder.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1995 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joe Williams hasn't had an "Unplugged" show yet on MTV. And he hasn't made any recordings with Bono, added rap music to his act or done any reggae tunes, either. A generation that has come to consider Tony Bennett a kind of hip elder uncle would probably not be able to pick Williams out of a crowd. And even some of his greatest fans still tend to think of him only as a blues shouter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1994 | DON HECKMAN
An evening with George Shearing and Joe Williams is always a pleasure, and Friday's concert at the Wadsworth Theater was no exception. Shearing, playing with bassist Neil Swainson, opened the bill with a program that has been honed over the years to a sharp edge: a couple of be-bop tunes--"Bird Feathers" and "Donna Lee"--a few ballads, a middle groove tune or two, and a healthy sprinkling of Shearing's droll, shaggy dog humor.
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