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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choreographer Joel Christensen has been pounding the pavement lately. The 24-year-old Toronto-born hoofer, who's one of the whiz kids of the mega-athletic modern strain known as "hyperdance," isn't looking for work. But he has been taking his dance to the streets, at sites from the Third Street Promenade to the UCLA quad. Tripping the light fantastic outdoors is no mere "Singin' in the Rain" homage, though, it's a career move. "I thought 'What can I do to make myself stand out?'
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1994 | JAN BRESLAUER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Choreographer Joel Christensen has been pounding the pavement lately. The 24-year-old Toronto-born hoofer, who's one of the whiz kids of the mega-athletic modern strain known as "hyperdance," isn't looking for work. But he has been taking his dance to the streets, at sites from the Third Street Promenade to the UCLA quad. Tripping the light fantastic outdoors is no mere "Singin' in the Rain" homage, though, it's a career move. "I thought 'What can I do to make myself stand out?'
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1995 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
To contemporary choreographer Susan Rose, sequencing is destiny. She doesn't invent movement but gathers whatever's out there--folk dance, ballet, martial arts--then chops her sources into repeatable motifs and assembles them in intricate constructions marked by a powerful sense of drive but scarcely any hint of dynamic variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, TIMES DANCE WRITER
Add lanky, Toronto-born Joel Christensen to the growing list of locally based, daredevil, dance-till-they-drop athlete-choreographers headed by Mehmet Sander and Stephanie Gilliland. Long stretches of Christensen's hyper-physical, five-part "Industrial Dance" program, Sunday at the Dynarski Theater in Hollywood, may have swerved into sudden-death aerobics, but the best moments confirmed the existence of a spunky intelligence to match his gleaming muscles.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1995 | LEWIS SEGAL
To contemporary choreographer Susan Rose, sequencing is destiny. She doesn't invent movement but gathers whatever's out there--folk dance, ballet, martial arts--then chops her sources into repeatable motifs and assembles them in intricate constructions marked by a powerful sense of drive but scarcely any hint of dynamic variety.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1994 | JENNIFER FISHER
There was no music in four of the five short works called "Machine" by Christensen Dance Company on Thursday night at the Los Angeles Theatre Center. Replacing it was a steady sound scape of dancers' breathing--panting, grunts of exhaustion and pronounced exhalations. Fatigue-as-accompaniment made sense in Joel Christensen's earlier pieces on the program--the task-oriented "Blocks," and his solos "Boing" or "Tired," in which he frolics among tires he constantly rearranges.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar.
S woosh. Oooooomphf! Ahhhhhh . . . Four performers dangle headfirst, in front and near the top of a 40-foot-high yellow wall. Held aloft by nearly invisible wires, they fly out over the heads of onlookers, then swoop back in a single graceful move. Belly-flopping against the wall, they crumple into little pill-bug shapes. Then, seconds later, they soar out into space again, pairing off in double-decker balance formations--weightless wonders, spacewalkers in an advanced gymnastics class.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1994 | LEWIS SEGAL, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer
In an era of fires, floods, earthquakes, riots, recession and AIDS, L.A.-area modern dance suddenly teems with metaphors for survival. Throughout the Southland, a major trend in local work is defined by hyper-athletic, risk-oriented dancing in which contending with physical objects and with changing architectural conditions reflects feelings about trying to exist in a confined, threatening or out-of-control environment. This isn't protest art; it's movement for movement's sake.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1994 | Lewis Segal, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer.
New venues changed the pat tern of dance presentation in Southern California during 1994, adding institutional nouns ("the Luckman," "the Carpenter") to the audience's vocabulary. Meanwhile other venues fell prey to weird programming obsessions.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1993 | LEWIS SEGAL, Lewis Segal is The Times' dance writer
Call it the year of the smorgasbord. In response to what seemed a crisis of both funding support and public interest, the American concert-dance community kept resorting to the variety-show format as a fix-all--perhaps counting on safety-in-numbers or feeling that a nation enslaved to the wireless remote control can't endure dance events unless they change radically every 15 minutes. The mixed bill is nothing new, of course. But the art of curatorship--a.k.a.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1994 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a Times staff writer.
For Frank Guevara, there's more to life than Mexican hat dances. The modern dancer-choreographer doesn't believe that all Latinos should have to stick to folk forms. "There're a lot of people who don't accept modern work, who think that ethnic dance is what you should be doing," the East Los Angeles native says over lunch in a small Little Tokyo eatery. "They still see that as being the only dance for Latino people. We're going into 1995, and people still believe that."
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