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Joel Coen

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - The hometown favorite won big time at the Festival de Cannes on Sunday night as France's "Blue Is the Warmest Color" walked off with the Palme d'Or. In a highly unusual step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize was given not only to director Abdellatif Kechiche ("The Secret of the Grain"), as is traditional, but to co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux as well. Both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage. The sexually explicit story of a young woman discovering desire and herself, "Blue" was the great favorite of French critics but divided English speakers, who called it everything from voyeuristic to the gold standard for lesbian romances to a three-hour Sundance movie in French.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Amy Dawes
"It's fun to use my singing voice as part of a character," says pop superstar Justin Timberlake, describing how he toned down his vibrato and adjusted his guitar-strumming to portray clean-cut, early '60s folk singer Jim Berkey in the Coen brothers' "Inside Llewyn Davis. " One of the most delightful scenes in the movie, which opened Friday, involves a spirited recording session for a goofy novelty song called "Please Mr. Kennedy" - a plea to not be drafted into the space race. Jim sets the pace, instructing his musician buddy Llewyn (Oscar Isaac)
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As much as any directors working today, the brothers Coen, Ethan and Joel, are unmistakable auteurs, filmmakers who place their own distinctive stamp on everything they do. But while the bleak, funny, exquisitely made "Inside Llewyn Davis" echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of their best films. Like the Coens' earlier "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," "Inside" sends a protagonist with links to Homer's Odyssey (here it's an ornery cat named Ulysses)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Since the release of their neo-noir "Blood Simple" in 1984, Joel and Ethan Coen have kept the flames of movie love burning. In one after another of their features, the brothers have revisited classic film genres and bygone eras, carving out a signature filmmaking style with great visual flair and their trademark ironic deadpan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A war of the posters is going on in a certain acting family. They're battling on the streets and walls of this film festival town. The husband is losing, badly, but he's enchanted and, frankly, bemused. "My wife's here, big as hell," says Billy Bob Thornton, pointing over his shoulder at the huge blowups of Angelina Jolie as "Lara Croft, Tomb Raider" that dwarf the entrance to the Carlton Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2005 | John Clark, Special to The Times
On a chilly night in April, a group of distinguished actors -- Steve Buscemi, Marcia Gay Harden, Philip Seymour Hoffman, John Goodman, Brooke Smith, John Slattery -- took their places onstage without makeup, costuming or props and began speaking in tongues. Since what they were saying was written by Joel and Ethan Coen ("Fargo") as a parody of western serials, they channeled prissy schoolmarms, belligerent gunfighters and crusty country doctors.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Expectations to the contrary, Joel Coen is "not an indiscriminate fan of violent films." He and his brother Ethan may have made some legendarily ferocious films, including the likes of "Fargo" and "Blood Simple," but, Joel says, "there are certain violent ones I see the previews for and I say, 'I don't want to go.'
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2013 | By Amy Dawes
"It's fun to use my singing voice as part of a character," says pop superstar Justin Timberlake, describing how he toned down his vibrato and adjusted his guitar-strumming to portray clean-cut, early '60s folk singer Jim Berkey in the Coen brothers' "Inside Llewyn Davis. " One of the most delightful scenes in the movie, which opened Friday, involves a spirited recording session for a goofy novelty song called "Please Mr. Kennedy" - a plea to not be drafted into the space race. Jim sets the pace, instructing his musician buddy Llewyn (Oscar Isaac)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1991
The Coen Brothers' latest film, "Barton Fink," got a rousing reception at its world premiere Saturday at the Cannes Film Festival. The only question was, did anybody get it? The Coens, co-writers and co-directors Joel and Ethan, were offering no explanations to the international press, but they were clearly amused at the questions. "Hmmm, the meaning?" said Ethan Coen, scratching his chin at Saturday's press conference. "That's something we are sort of reluctant to get into.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
FX's upcoming "Fargo" limited series is rounding out its cast, and has added some notable names, including "Breaking Bad's" Bob Odenkirk and Kate Walsh of "Private Practice. " In case you've been crossing your fingers that AMC's "Breaking Bad" follow-up, "Better Call Saul," gets the go-ahead, don't worry about Odenkirk's appearance on "Fargo. " The key words are "limited series. " The 10-episode adaptation of Joel and Ethan Coen's film crime classic shares the motion picture's Minnesota setting and title, but that's about it. Producers promise that this "Fargo" will tell a completely new story, but retain the film's "true story" conceit.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - The hometown favorite won big time at the Festival de Cannes on Sunday night as France's "Blue Is the Warmest Color" walked off with the Palme d'Or. In a highly unusual step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize was given not only to director Abdellatif Kechiche ("The Secret of the Grain"), as is traditional, but to co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux as well. Both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage. The sexually explicit story of a young woman discovering desire and herself, "Blue" was the great favorite of French critics but divided English speakers, who called it everything from voyeuristic to the gold standard for lesbian romances to a three-hour Sundance movie in French.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Expectations to the contrary, Joel Coen is "not an indiscriminate fan of violent films." He and his brother Ethan may have made some legendarily ferocious films, including the likes of "Fargo" and "Blood Simple," but, Joel says, "there are certain violent ones I see the previews for and I say, 'I don't want to go.'
ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 2005 | John Clark, Special to The Times
On a chilly night in April, a group of distinguished actors -- Steve Buscemi, Marcia Gay Harden, Philip Seymour Hoffman, John Goodman, Brooke Smith, John Slattery -- took their places onstage without makeup, costuming or props and began speaking in tongues. Since what they were saying was written by Joel and Ethan Coen ("Fargo") as a parody of western serials, they channeled prissy schoolmarms, belligerent gunfighters and crusty country doctors.
NEWS
March 3, 2005 | Don Shirley
Filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen and Charlie Kaufman are collaborating on a theatrical production, "Theater of the New Ear," set for April 28-30 at St. Ann's Warehouse in Brooklyn, where it will be taped for broadcast on Sirius Satellite Radio. Among the eight cast members are Meryl Streep, Steve Buscemi, Hope Davis and Philip Seymour Hoffman.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2004 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
Since the release of their neo-noir "Blood Simple" in 1984, Joel and Ethan Coen have kept the flames of movie love burning. In one after another of their features, the brothers have revisited classic film genres and bygone eras, carving out a signature filmmaking style with great visual flair and their trademark ironic deadpan.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
FX's upcoming "Fargo" limited series is rounding out its cast, and has added some notable names, including "Breaking Bad's" Bob Odenkirk and Kate Walsh of "Private Practice. " In case you've been crossing your fingers that AMC's "Breaking Bad" follow-up, "Better Call Saul," gets the go-ahead, don't worry about Odenkirk's appearance on "Fargo. " The key words are "limited series. " The 10-episode adaptation of Joel and Ethan Coen's film crime classic shares the motion picture's Minnesota setting and title, but that's about it. Producers promise that this "Fargo" will tell a completely new story, but retain the film's "true story" conceit.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
As much as any directors working today, the brothers Coen, Ethan and Joel, are unmistakable auteurs, filmmakers who place their own distinctive stamp on everything they do. But while the bleak, funny, exquisitely made "Inside Llewyn Davis" echoes familiar themes and narrative journeys, it also goes its own way and becomes a singular experience, one of their best films. Like the Coens' earlier "O Brother, Where Art Thou?," "Inside" sends a protagonist with links to Homer's Odyssey (here it's an ornery cat named Ulysses)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
A war of the posters is going on in a certain acting family. They're battling on the streets and walls of this film festival town. The husband is losing, badly, but he's enchanted and, frankly, bemused. "My wife's here, big as hell," says Billy Bob Thornton, pointing over his shoulder at the huge blowups of Angelina Jolie as "Lara Croft, Tomb Raider" that dwarf the entrance to the Carlton Hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2001 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
What do the movie-making Coen brothers--the joyously ironic brains behind my favorite movie of 2000, "O Brother, Where Art Thou?"--have in common with Billy Wilder, Alfred Hitchcock, Luis Bunuel and Stanley Kubrick? Great movies on their filmographies? A mastery of dark comedy? Both true, but that's still only partly right. The directors above, who gave us--respectively--"Fargo," "Some Like It Hot," "Rear Window" 'Belle de Jour" and "Dr.
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