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October 21, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
If she's such an angel, why are you lookin' for her at 4 in the morning? --Gabriel Byrne to Albert Finney in "Miller's Crossing" How can we describe the Coen Brothers? Tongue-in-cheek devotees of American sociopathology? Film noirettes? The sons of Hammett and Chandler, branded by Cain? Or just two guys who like to make movies where the camera races around below knee level? Pigeon-hole them where you will, they're unique.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - The hometown favorite won big time at the Festival de Cannes on Sunday night as France's "Blue Is the Warmest Color" walked off with the Palme d'Or. In a highly unusual step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize was given not only to director Abdellatif Kechiche ("The Secret of the Grain"), as is traditional, but to co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux as well. Both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage. The sexually explicit story of a young woman discovering desire and herself, "Blue" was the great favorite of French critics but divided English speakers, who called it everything from voyeuristic to the gold standard for lesbian romances to a three-hour Sundance movie in French.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
In a victory that was all the more satisfying for being both expected and deserved, Mike Leigh's remarkable, truthful and emotional "Secrets and Lies" won the Palme d'Or Monday night at the 49th Cannes International Film Festival. "This is quite overwhelming, thank you for all of us who went through hell making this film and enjoyed every minute of it," said the bearded 52-year-old British director, who won the prize here in 1993 for best direction with his last film, "Naked."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
In a victory that was all the more satisfying for being both expected and deserved, Mike Leigh's remarkable, truthful and emotional "Secrets and Lies" won the Palme d'Or Monday night at the 49th Cannes International Film Festival. "This is quite overwhelming, thank you for all of us who went through hell making this film and enjoyed every minute of it," said the bearded 52-year-old British director, who won the prize here in 1993 for best direction with his last film, "Naked."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
CANNES, France - The hometown favorite won big time at the Festival de Cannes on Sunday night as France's "Blue Is the Warmest Color" walked off with the Palme d'Or. In a highly unusual step, jury president Steven Spielberg announced that the prize was given not only to director Abdellatif Kechiche ("The Secret of the Grain"), as is traditional, but to co-stars Adèle Exarchopoulos and Léa Seydoux as well. Both actresses were in tears by the time they reached the stage. The sexually explicit story of a young woman discovering desire and herself, "Blue" was the great favorite of French critics but divided English speakers, who called it everything from voyeuristic to the gold standard for lesbian romances to a three-hour Sundance movie in French.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
No one is the same after encountering feisty, fearless and plain-spoken Mattie Ross, age 14, from near Dardanelle in Yell County, Ark. Not the other characters in the Charles Portis novel she dominates, and certainly not the filmmaking Coen brothers, Ethan and Joel. The Coens corralled stars Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, Josh Brolin and Barry Pepper and newcomer Hailee Steinfeld and came away with "True Grit," one of their most broadly entertaining films yet. Mattie has a habit of turning people around, she really does.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1990 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
If she's such an angel, why are you lookin' for her at 4 in the morning? --Gabriel Byrne to Albert Finney in "Miller's Crossing" How can we describe the Coen Brothers? Tongue-in-cheek devotees of American sociopathology? Film noirettes? The sons of Hammett and Chandler, branded by Cain? Or just two guys who like to make movies where the camera races around below knee level? Pigeon-hole them where you will, they're unique.
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