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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1995
"If you were to draw a circle with a 60-mile radius around Los Angeles, and declare the domain an independent nation, it would be the 11th-richest realm on Earth." -- "Edge City," by JOEL GARREAU
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1995
"If you were to draw a circle with a 60-mile radius around Los Angeles, and declare the domain an independent nation, it would be the 11th-richest realm on Earth." -- "Edge City," by JOEL GARREAU
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out of the endless suburban sprawl that once characterized much of Orange County, several new "edge cities" have emerged, combining the lush green lawns of suburbia with "downtown" office buildings, jobs, shopping and cultural activities, a new book concludes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | VICTOR VALLE
Los Angeles, dubbed the cultural capital of the Pacific Rim, is in a unique position. But what kind of arts and culture will this city produce in the next decade and beyond? Calendar posed this and other questions to four writers and one researcher in the business of soothsaying: James Fallows, an Oxford and Harvard graduate who, for three years, has reported from Yokohama for The Atlantic.
BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Alex Raksin
By "edge city," Washington Post senior writer Joel Garreau means those verdant landscapes where tree-lined office towers gaze at one another "through bands of glass that mirror the sun in blue or silver or green or gold," where tasteful signs mark corporations "apparently named after Klingon warriors," and where there are enough jobs, homes and entertainment to fulfill "all the functions a city ever has."
BUSINESS
October 16, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, Times staff writer
Prospective civilian uses for the soon-to-be vacated Marine Corps Air Station at El Toro will be the topic Tuesday when the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute sponsors a program on El Toro and Orange County's future. Scheduled speakers at the lengthy (5-9:30 p.m.) briefing include industrial and residential real estate developer Peter Bedford; land-use consultant Edward Lubieniecki and urban development specialist Joel Garreau.
OPINION
July 17, 2005 | Joel Garreau
Gordon Moore, one of the three founders of Intel, in 1965 noted that the number of transistors you could cram onto a piece of silicon for a dollar had been routinely doubling since the first commercial chip six years before. His bold prediction that such doublings would continue came to be known as "Moore's Law." By any name, the pace of technological change is prodding human evolution. In 2003, Intel shipped its 1 billionth microchip. In 2007, it expects to ship its 2 billionth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1993 | RICHARD CORE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Instead of debates about whether the El Toro Marine Corps Air Station should become the site of a commercial airport, a prison or low-cost housing, a group of local planners Tuesday urged leaders to first consider giving Orange County what it notoriously lacks: a center. "I see this as a marvelous opportunity to do something to solidify Orange County," Peter Bedford, chief executive officer of Bedford Property Investment Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | CATHERINE GEWERTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out of the endless suburban sprawl that once characterized much of Orange County, several new "edge cities" have emerged, combining the lush green lawns of suburbia with "downtown" office buildings, jobs, shopping and cultural activities, a new book concludes.
BOOKS
September 22, 1991 | Alex Raksin
By "edge city," Washington Post senior writer Joel Garreau means those verdant landscapes where tree-lined office towers gaze at one another "through bands of glass that mirror the sun in blue or silver or green or gold," where tasteful signs mark corporations "apparently named after Klingon warriors," and where there are enough jobs, homes and entertainment to fulfill "all the functions a city ever has."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1989 | VICTOR VALLE
Los Angeles, dubbed the cultural capital of the Pacific Rim, is in a unique position. But what kind of arts and culture will this city produce in the next decade and beyond? Calendar posed this and other questions to four writers and one researcher in the business of soothsaying: James Fallows, an Oxford and Harvard graduate who, for three years, has reported from Yokohama for The Atlantic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A campaign by urban planners to spruce up commercial districts by removing tall signs from gas stations, banks and other roadside establishments is gradually transforming Orange County's street scape. Along busy thoroughfares such as La Palma Avenue, Harbor Boulevard and Bristol Street, a combination of stricter regulations, changing architectural styles and taxpayer-financed incentive programs has brought down dozens of imposing florescent and neon signs.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The best place to watch PBS' three-part series "Coming and Going" is on a monitor in a plane, or a train, or even in an automobile. This sometimes serious, sometimes off-kilter exploration of American transportation passions and problems is as much in motion as its subject. Being sedentary, in your living room, is not the place to be for this show. Producer Craig Perry assembles the series' various pieces with intelligence, if not always with care.
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