Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoel Havemann
IN THE NEWS

Joel Havemann

FEATURED ARTICLES
MAGAZINE
December 5, 2004
The cover story "Taming My Tremor" (by Joel Havemann, Nov. 14) hit home because my stepfather, Rod, has Parkinson's and has had two surgeries. The second was to move the electrodes to ensure that they were in the optimal place. Rod was 32 when he was diagnosed with the disease, and he has been a guinea pig for just about everything that neurology has come up with. I can attest that the surgeries have improved his quality of life, though he is constantly being reprogrammed to the right setting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
MAGAZINE
December 5, 2004
The cover story "Taming My Tremor" (by Joel Havemann, Nov. 14) hit home because my stepfather, Rod, has Parkinson's and has had two surgeries. The second was to move the electrodes to ensure that they were in the optimal place. Rod was 32 when he was diagnosed with the disease, and he has been a guinea pig for just about everything that neurology has come up with. I can attest that the surgeries have improved his quality of life, though he is constantly being reprogrammed to the right setting.
Advertisement
BOOKS
June 16, 2002 | ABRAHAM VERGHESE, Abraham Verghese is a physician, writer and the author, most recently, of "The Tennis Partner."
In its end stages, Parkinson's disease can reduce its victims to a frozen, rigid, mute, unblinking, locked-in state. In writing about their struggles with this disease, Joel Havemann and Michael J. Fox display the opposite qualities: nimbleness, great passion, hyper-alertness and an awareness of what is meaningful in life--as if the disease has blessed them with special vision and a unique voice.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 2004 | Joel Havemann, Joel Havemann, an assistant editor in The Times' Washington bureau, is the author of "A Life Shaken: My Encounter with Parkinson's Disease" (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002).
This is a story about a miracle of modern medicine, and about the quiet heroism of anyone who endures chronic illness. Three things that Joel Havemann, the author of this article, is too modest to say about himself: He's one of the best-loved people in his workplace, the Washington bureau of the Los Angeles Times, because he's both hard-working and easygoing, tough and gentle at the same time.
MAGAZINE
November 14, 2004 | Joel Havemann, Joel Havemann, an assistant editor in The Times' Washington bureau, is the author of "A Life Shaken: My Encounter with Parkinson's Disease" (The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002).
This is a story about a miracle of modern medicine, and about the quiet heroism of anyone who endures chronic illness. Three things that Joel Havemann, the author of this article, is too modest to say about himself: He's one of the best-loved people in his workplace, the Washington bureau of the Los Angeles Times, because he's both hard-working and easygoing, tough and gentle at the same time.
NEWS
December 17, 1989
Principal Writers, Reporters: Charles T. Powers, Michael Parks, Dan Fisher, William Tuohy, Art Pine, Doyle McManus, Rone Tempest, Tamara Jones, David Lauter, Ron Russell, Don Cook. Editors: K.E.S. Kirby, Warren Girard, Joel Havemann. News Editor: Paul Whitefield. News Editor/Graphics: Jane Engle. Photo Editor: Larry Armstrong. Staff Photographs: Al Seib. Artists: Victor Kotowitz. Research Librarian: Tom Lutgen. Photo Librarian: Mildred Simpson.
BOOKS
May 18, 1986
Regarding Joel Havemann's review of David A. Stockman's "The Triumph of Politics: Why the Reagan Revolution Failed" (The Book Review, April 27), although I agree with Havemann's opinion that Stockman is kind of a jerk, I must say that a person who describes Ronald Reagan, as Stockman did, as a "shallow, sweet old man who thinks in anecdotes, not concepts," cannot be all bad. NORM PLISCOU Holtville, Calif.
NEWS
September 13, 1987
Los Angeles Times reporters, editors, photographers, artists and researchers from Washington and Los Angeles composed the team for this special section. Reporters: David Lauter, David Savage, Rudy Abramson, Lee May, Karen Tumulty, Norman Kempster, Robert L. Jackson and David Ferrell. Photographers: Bernie Boston and Al Stephenson. Editors: Gerald J. Brown, Arthur M. Berman, Richard T. Cooper, Joel Havemann and Tom McCarthy. News Editor: Steve Mitchell.
BOOKS
June 30, 2002
To the editor: Abraham Verghese's review of Joel Havemann's "A Life Shaken" and Michael J. Fox's " Lucky Man" (June 16) refers to the movement opposing stem-cell research as "this Luddite trend." The Luddites who smashed weaving machines at the beginning of the 19th century were not opposed to progress per se, but rather to rampant unrestrained industrialization, which they wisely foresaw (and personally experienced) as leading to dehumanization and social upheaval. The Luddites themselves would welcome advances in science and medicine intended to alleviate human suffering.
NEWS
February 13, 1999
National Editor: Scott Kraft Project coordinator: Tom Furlong Project editors--Washington: Joel Havemann, Johanna Neuman Project editors--Los Angeles: Bret Israel, Mary Ann Meek Writers: Geraldine Baum, Richard T. Cooper, James Gerstenzang, Josh Getlin, Eric Lichtblau, Doyle McManus, Elizabeth Mehren, Ann W. O'Neill, Alissa J. Rubin, David G.
BOOKS
June 16, 2002 | ABRAHAM VERGHESE, Abraham Verghese is a physician, writer and the author, most recently, of "The Tennis Partner."
In its end stages, Parkinson's disease can reduce its victims to a frozen, rigid, mute, unblinking, locked-in state. In writing about their struggles with this disease, Joel Havemann and Michael J. Fox display the opposite qualities: nimbleness, great passion, hyper-alertness and an awareness of what is meaningful in life--as if the disease has blessed them with special vision and a unique voice.
OPINION
November 28, 2006
Re "Hope is the one antidote," Column One, Nov. 23 Times staff writer Joel Havemann's brilliant article on hope was one of the most inspiring and moving I've ever read in any newspaper, and you have served your community well by printing it. Havemann's willingness to bare his soul -- to openly share with us his daily challenges -- will, no doubt, help others to cope with theirs. Distinguishing between "realistic" and "Pollyannaish" hope is an important reminder when dealing with degenerative diseases.
NEWS
January 31, 1999
National Editor: Scott Kraft Project editor: Joel Havemann Writers: Stephen Braun, Richard T. Cooper, William C. Rempel, David G. Savage, Richard A. Serrano and Elizabeth Shogren. Reporters: Geraldine Baum, Ronald Brownstein, Edwin Chen, Faye Fiore, Lisa Getter, Janet Hook, Robert L. Jackson, Marc Lacey, Eric Lichtblau, Doyle McManus, Alan C. Miller, Kim Murphy, Jack Nelson, Ronald J. Ostrow, Judy Pasternak and Paul Richter.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|