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Joel Hodgson

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2009 | Tom Shales
Noel Coward once noted "how potent cheap music is." The old boy never saw "The Brain That Wouldn't Die" or he might also have observed how enjoyable, how amusing and even how comforting a lousy movie can be. It's no sacrilege to quote Coward in a story about a television series that celebrates bad movies: "Mystery Science Theater 3000." To the dismay of its truly devoted fans, the show is gone now but then again, not entirely gone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On any given Saturday night, Los Angeles serves up a dozen cultural oddities across the city, from beach-side circus tricks to downtown performance art. But perhaps stranger still is the chance to see these far-off acts all under one roof. Started by the folks behind the geek-chic underground comedy gathering Super Ball, Saturday's TwentyWonder gathers a dozen of the city's marvels for a one-night whirl of art, science and music with proceeds benefiting Down Syndrome Assn. of Los Angeles.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joel Hodgson was flying high. In fact, he was in orbit. As Joel Robinson, the sleepy-eyed, genially mopey janitor forced to sit through and heckle crummy movies on the award-winning cult TV hit "Mystery Science Theater 3000," Hodgson had critical acclaim and a loyal fan base. Sure, he was on cable, Monopoly money compared to network megabucks, but as creator and executive producer of his Minneapolis-based series, he had more creative freedom than most TV artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2009 | Tom Shales
Noel Coward once noted "how potent cheap music is." The old boy never saw "The Brain That Wouldn't Die" or he might also have observed how enjoyable, how amusing and even how comforting a lousy movie can be. It's no sacrilege to quote Coward in a story about a television series that celebrates bad movies: "Mystery Science Theater 3000." To the dismay of its truly devoted fans, the show is gone now but then again, not entirely gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Changing Hosts: Joel Hodgson, star of Comedy Central's cult series "Mystery Science Theater 3000," is stepping down as Joel Robinson, the tormented Gizmonics Institute employee, who, with his robot companions Tom Servo and Crow, is forced to watch bad movies. Replacing Hodgson will be head writer and frequent guest star Mike Nelson, who will take over in a special episode midway through the fifth season of 24 episodes currently in production.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Susan King
THE OLD gang is back. Joel Hodgson, the creator and original host of the Peabody Award-winning series "Mystery Science Theater 3000," and several of the show's regulars have regrouped as Cinematic Titanic. And the troupe will make its L.A. debut Saturday night at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre crew skewering Roger Corman's 1959 "The Wasp Woman" as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival. Cinematic Titanic is the brainchild of Hodgson, who played a young man shot into space and forced to watch and riff on bad movies with his puppet pals Tom Servo and Crow on "MST3K."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2012 | By Jamie Wetherbe, Special to the Los Angeles Times
On any given Saturday night, Los Angeles serves up a dozen cultural oddities across the city, from beach-side circus tricks to downtown performance art. But perhaps stranger still is the chance to see these far-off acts all under one roof. Started by the folks behind the geek-chic underground comedy gathering Super Ball, Saturday's TwentyWonder gathers a dozen of the city's marvels for a one-night whirl of art, science and music with proceeds benefiting Down Syndrome Assn. of Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1991 | CHRIS WILLMAN
What's worse than watching a bad movie? Watching someone else watching a bad movie? Not quite. The oddly titled series "Mystery Science Theater 3000" offers the chance to catch up on sci-fi schlock, badly dubbed Japanese monster pictures, biker blowouts and other obscure nuggets of dung--with the bonus of a reasonably funny running commentary from three wiseacres in the row ahead of us, whose heads we see in silhouette at the bottom of the TV screen throughout the film.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1999 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest batch of television shows hitting the home video market ranges from high camp to high drama to vintage rock 'n' roll. Baby boomers will get a kick out of the "Green Acres" collection (Orion, $10 each). The silly sitcom ran on CBS from 1965 to 1971 and starred Eddie Albert as New York attorney Oliver Wendell Douglas, who makes his childhood dream of farming come true when he buys a rundown spread in Hooterville.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 1996 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Movie" is based on a concept so simple and obvious cynics everywhere must be kicking themselves for not thinking of it themselves: Take a minor motion picture of questionable artistic merit and have a trio of kibitzers supplement the soundtrack with a stream of wicked wisecracks. For the last seven years those exceptional jibes have been the exclusive property of the cable TV show known to fans as "MST3K."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2008 | Susan King
THE OLD gang is back. Joel Hodgson, the creator and original host of the Peabody Award-winning series "Mystery Science Theater 3000," and several of the show's regulars have regrouped as Cinematic Titanic. And the troupe will make its L.A. debut Saturday night at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre crew skewering Roger Corman's 1959 "The Wasp Woman" as part of the Los Angeles Film Festival. Cinematic Titanic is the brainchild of Hodgson, who played a young man shot into space and forced to watch and riff on bad movies with his puppet pals Tom Servo and Crow on "MST3K."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 28, 1998 | DAVID KRONKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joel Hodgson was flying high. In fact, he was in orbit. As Joel Robinson, the sleepy-eyed, genially mopey janitor forced to sit through and heckle crummy movies on the award-winning cult TV hit "Mystery Science Theater 3000," Hodgson had critical acclaim and a loyal fan base. Sure, he was on cable, Monopoly money compared to network megabucks, but as creator and executive producer of his Minneapolis-based series, he had more creative freedom than most TV artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1993 | SUSAN KING, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Changing Hosts: Joel Hodgson, star of Comedy Central's cult series "Mystery Science Theater 3000," is stepping down as Joel Robinson, the tormented Gizmonics Institute employee, who, with his robot companions Tom Servo and Crow, is forced to watch bad movies. Replacing Hodgson will be head writer and frequent guest star Mike Nelson, who will take over in a special episode midway through the fifth season of 24 episodes currently in production.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2008 | Sheri Linden, Linden is a freelance writer.
It came from Minneapolis. By way of the Gizmonic Institute and the Satellite of Love, it blasted onto Earthlings' living-room screens with a mission: not to save us from bad movies but to share our pain. Because if misery loves company, schlock-induced agony craves it. Over 11 years and 198 episodes, "Mystery Science Theater 3000" provided the perfect company for a community of fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1996 | LEE HARRIS and SUSAN KING
CBS' "Murder, She Wrote" isn't the only long-running series coming to an end this weekend. Comedy Central's cult favorite "Mystery Science Theater 3000" brings its seven seasons to a close today at 5. As the Satellite of Love nears the end of the galaxy, Mike Nelson and his wisecracking robots, Tom Servo and Crow, watch their last cheesy movie, a 1978 dud called "Laserblast." Repeats of the Peabody Award-winning series continue on Comedy Central.
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