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Joel I Klein

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BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Klein to Replace Bingaman as Antitrust Chief: Joel I. Klein, now the No. 2 official in the Justice Department's antitrust division, will become the acting chief when Anne K. Bingaman returns to the private sector this fall. Klein, 49, has been principal deputy assistant attorney general in the division since April 1, 1995. Before that, he was a deputy White House counsel.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joel I. Klein, the antitrust enforcer who made the decision to take on Microsoft Corp. and its billionaire Chairman Bill Gates in a landmark antitrust battle, announced Tuesday that he will resign by month's end. The departure of the 53-year-old Klein was seen as potentially beneficial to the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant, which saw its shares climb $2, to close at $65, on Tuesday. The increase capped a broad rally of technology stocks that have largely stumbled since last spring, when U.
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OPINION
April 12, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Ronald J. Ostrow has covered the Justice Department and related assignments for The Times since 1966
Even for fickle Washington, the swift turnabout in the assessment of Joel I. Klein as the nation's chief trustbuster may set a record--just like the mushrooming number of mergers confronting him. Denounced last summer by Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) as "an antitrust fellow here who rolls over and plays dead" for failing to challenge Bell Atlantic's $21-billion acquisition of Nynex Corp., the 5-foot, 6-inch.
OPINION
April 12, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Ronald J. Ostrow has covered the Justice Department and related assignments for The Times since 1966
Even for fickle Washington, the swift turnabout in the assessment of Joel I. Klein as the nation's chief trustbuster may set a record--just like the mushrooming number of mergers confronting him. Denounced last summer by Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) as "an antitrust fellow here who rolls over and plays dead" for failing to challenge Bell Atlantic's $21-billion acquisition of Nynex Corp., the 5-foot, 6-inch.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joel I. Klein, the antitrust enforcer who made the decision to take on Microsoft Corp. and its billionaire Chairman Bill Gates in a landmark antitrust battle, announced Tuesday that he will resign by month's end. The departure of the 53-year-old Klein was seen as potentially beneficial to the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant, which saw its shares climb $2, to close at $65, on Tuesday. The increase capped a broad rally of technology stocks that have largely stumbled since last spring, when U.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2000
The Justice Department filed suit to block a deal it said would eliminate competition in the sale of pumps used in 90% of U.S. gas stations to transfer gasoline from underground tanks to surface dispensers. The civil antitrust suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Madison, Wis., would block a proposed joint venture between Franklin Electric Co. and United Dominion Industries Inc.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1998 | From Associated Press
The Justice Department approved the merger of Loews Theatres and Cineplex Odeon Corp. after winning their agreement Thursday to sell 25 movie theaters in metropolitan Chicago and New York's borough of Manhattan. "This is a big win for moviegoing consumers," said Assistant Atty. Gen. Joel I. Klein, head of the department's antitrust division.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1998 | Times Wire Services
Chancellor Media Corp. received government clearance for its $930-million purchase of Whiteco Industries Inc., the nation's largest privately held billboard company, after agreeing to sell off outdoor advertising assets in four states. Chancellor, through its Martin Media unit, and Whiteco are head-to-head competitors in the business of selling outdoor advertising such as billboard space to business consumers.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1998 | Associated Press
UCAR International Inc. agreed to pay a record $110-million fine and plead guilty to scheming with competitors to fix prices of graphite electrodes and divide the world market among them, the Justice Department said. The fine is the largest in antitrust history, the department said. Joel I.
BUSINESS
October 3, 1997 | PETER BEHR, WASHINGTON POST
Raytheon Co. and Hughes Aircraft Co. got federal clearance Thursday for a $9.5-billion merger creating the nation's third-largest defense contractor, provided that Raytheon sells two advanced electronics divisions and takes steps to preserve competition in missile production. The Justice Department's antitrust division approved the merger when Raytheon agreed to sell its Dallas-based unit that produces infrared missile guidance systems and Hughes' operations in El Segundo and La Grange, Ga.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Klein to Replace Bingaman as Antitrust Chief: Joel I. Klein, now the No. 2 official in the Justice Department's antitrust division, will become the acting chief when Anne K. Bingaman returns to the private sector this fall. Klein, 49, has been principal deputy assistant attorney general in the division since April 1, 1995. Before that, he was a deputy White House counsel.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 1998
At a New York City press conference aimed at dissuading the Justice Department from holding up the June 25 release of Windows 98, Microsoft executives thundered that any delay in the release of the operating system would have "broad negative consequences . . . [for the] entire PC industry" and "throw sand into the gears of human progress."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000
Thousands of U.S. banks issue both Visa and MasterCard plastic, and the two giant cards restrict the banks from issuing other cards, such as American Express. However, there is no indication that consumers have suffered from this situation, as the government contends, or that breaking up the system under which the same group of banks controls Visa and MasterCard would bring the public any benefits.
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