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Joel Klein

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OPINION
April 12, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Ronald J. Ostrow has covered the Justice Department and related assignments for The Times since 1966
Even for fickle Washington, the swift turnabout in the assessment of Joel I. Klein as the nation's chief trustbuster may set a record--just like the mushrooming number of mergers confronting him. Denounced last summer by Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) as "an antitrust fellow here who rolls over and plays dead" for failing to challenge Bell Atlantic's $21-billion acquisition of Nynex Corp., the 5-foot, 6-inch.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
News Corp. is changing the reporting structure of its management and standards committee, which the media giant created in response to the ethics scandal at its British newspaper unit. The committee's purpose is to cooperate with the ongoing probe into News Corp.'s British newspapers as well as to serve as something akin to an internal affairs division. Last month, it issued a lengthy report that gave a clean bill of health toNews Corp.'s the Times and the Sunday Times. Joel Klein, a News Corp.
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NATIONAL
November 9, 2010
New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg named a top publishing executive Tuesday to head the nation's largest school system, after announcing that the city's longtime chancellor was stepping down. Bloomberg said Hearst Magazines Chairwoman Cathie Black would replace Joel Klein, who has overseen the city's 1.1 million-student school system since 2002. Klein said he was leaving to become an executive vice president at News Corp. The mayor said Klein had been looking to leave for a while but stayed until a replacement had been found.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Time
Lawrence "Lon" Jacobs, the general counsel of media giant News Corp. and a confidant of Chairman and Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch, is leaving the company after 15 years. Jacobs, 56, played a key role in several major media deals over the years, including News Corp.'s acquisitions of the Wall Street Journal and the social-networking site MySpace. Besides his duties as general counsel, he was also one of seven executives who served in Murdoch's Office of the Chairman, which acts as an advisory board of sorts for the company's leadership.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joel I. Klein, the antitrust enforcer who made the decision to take on Microsoft Corp. and its billionaire Chairman Bill Gates in a landmark antitrust battle, announced Tuesday that he will resign by month's end. The departure of the 53-year-old Klein was seen as potentially beneficial to the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant, which saw its shares climb $2, to close at $65, on Tuesday. The increase capped a broad rally of technology stocks that have largely stumbled since last spring, when U.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Time
Lawrence "Lon" Jacobs, the general counsel of media giant News Corp. and a confidant of Chairman and Chief Executive Rupert Murdoch, is leaving the company after 15 years. Jacobs, 56, played a key role in several major media deals over the years, including News Corp.'s acquisitions of the Wall Street Journal and the social-networking site MySpace. Besides his duties as general counsel, he was also one of seven executives who served in Murdoch's Office of the Chairman, which acts as an advisory board of sorts for the company's leadership.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Cathie Black, the high-profile magazine executive hand-picked by New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg to run the nation's largest school system, resigned Thursday after three tumultuous months on the job. The departure — Bloomberg said it was by mutual agreement — marked one of the more embarrassing episodes of the billionaire's three terms in office. Bloomberg, heralded by himself and others as a manager's manager who had brought business discipline to government, installed Black with virtually no consultation or any sense of political support.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
News Corp. is changing the reporting structure of its management and standards committee, which the media giant created in response to the ethics scandal at its British newspaper unit. The committee's purpose is to cooperate with the ongoing probe into News Corp.'s British newspapers as well as to serve as something akin to an internal affairs division. Last month, it issued a lengthy report that gave a clean bill of health toNews Corp.'s the Times and the Sunday Times. Joel Klein, a News Corp.
NEWS
July 18, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eric H. Holder Jr. won unanimous Senate confirmation to the Justice Department's No. 2 post, where he will be the highest-ranking black law-enforcement official in U.S. history. Holder, 46, the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia since 1993, will be deputy attorney general. Although there was no controversy over Holder, GOP leaders delayed his vote until the confirmation of Joel Klein as assistant attorney general for antitrust.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Schools Chancellor Joel Klein said he has hired Caroline Kennedy to run a new office intended to bring more private dollars to New York's public school system. Kennedy, 44, daughter of the late President Kennedy, will receive a token salary of $1 a year to run the city Education Department's new Office of Strategic Partnerships. She said she will begin working in the next few weeks.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times
Cathie Black, the high-profile magazine executive hand-picked by New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg to run the nation's largest school system, resigned Thursday after three tumultuous months on the job. The departure — Bloomberg said it was by mutual agreement — marked one of the more embarrassing episodes of the billionaire's three terms in office. Bloomberg, heralded by himself and others as a manager's manager who had brought business discipline to government, installed Black with virtually no consultation or any sense of political support.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2010
New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg named a top publishing executive Tuesday to head the nation's largest school system, after announcing that the city's longtime chancellor was stepping down. Bloomberg said Hearst Magazines Chairwoman Cathie Black would replace Joel Klein, who has overseen the city's 1.1 million-student school system since 2002. Klein said he was leaving to become an executive vice president at News Corp. The mayor said Klein had been looking to leave for a while but stayed until a replacement had been found.
BUSINESS
September 20, 2000 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Joel I. Klein, the antitrust enforcer who made the decision to take on Microsoft Corp. and its billionaire Chairman Bill Gates in a landmark antitrust battle, announced Tuesday that he will resign by month's end. The departure of the 53-year-old Klein was seen as potentially beneficial to the Redmond, Wash.-based software giant, which saw its shares climb $2, to close at $65, on Tuesday. The increase capped a broad rally of technology stocks that have largely stumbled since last spring, when U.
OPINION
April 12, 1998 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Ronald J. Ostrow has covered the Justice Department and related assignments for The Times since 1966
Even for fickle Washington, the swift turnabout in the assessment of Joel I. Klein as the nation's chief trustbuster may set a record--just like the mushrooming number of mergers confronting him. Denounced last summer by Sen. Ernest F. Hollings (D-S.C.) as "an antitrust fellow here who rolls over and plays dead" for failing to challenge Bell Atlantic's $21-billion acquisition of Nynex Corp., the 5-foot, 6-inch.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1998 | Associated Press
The Justice Department approved Monsanto's $2.3-billion acquisition of Dekalb Genetics Corp., after Monsanto altered the deal to preserve competition in corn biotechnology. In response to concerns raised by the department's antitrust division, Monsanto spun off its rights to a recently developed technology used to introduce desirable genetic traits into corn seed. Monsanto's claims on the technique, known as agrobacterium-mediated transformation technology, were transferred to UC Berkeley.
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