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Joel Kotkin

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NEWS
October 19, 1988 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
For Joel Kotkin, this is a city of black and white. Black people and white people. Debates framed in simplistic black-and-white terms instead of their various shades of complexity. And most significantly, an entrenched bureaucratic view of the world that rarely sees beyond memos written in black and white. "The crucial moment in my life was when I decided Washington wasn't the center of the universe, that I didn't have to be here to write about important issues of public policy," says Kotkin.
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OPINION
February 1, 2007
Re "A real estate bust would boost L.A.," Current, Jan. 28 Joel Kotkin's opinion that a real estate bust would be good for Los Angeles is moronic. Wealth destruction would surely have an overall dampening effect on the economy, costing jobs at every level of the socioeconomic strata. It is true that affordability represents a challenge for our society. This manifests itself in dense traffic. Instead of wishing for a housing crash, how about calling for a rail system from the less expensive suburbs to our work centers?
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BOOKS
September 11, 1988 | ALEX RAKSIN
Since Japan's economic successes in the late 1970s forced us to abandon McGeorge Bundy's vision of the American economy as "the locomotive at the head of mankind," we have developed a schizophrenic attitude toward Japan. Publicly, we admire the Japanese, paying tribute in numerous business books.
OPINION
December 7, 2006
Re "Rebuilding the middle class," Current, Dec. 3 Joel Kotkin and David Friedman want to use the shameful decline in government spending on infrastructure as a Trojan horse to advocate public subsidies to put even more of our roads, ports and airports into private hands. They assign blame for the growing inequalities in major cities such as Los Angeles and New York to the local liberal elites, although those elites have little control over regressive fiscal policies and declining support for New Deal and Great Society programs.
NEWS
February 12, 1993 | CONSTANCE CASEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Tribes" is a lot more fun to talk about than it is to read. It's easy to picture author Joel Kotkin on a lively radio show fielding calls from Jews irritated because they think he's saying there are too many Jews in the media and from Koreans offended because he has left them out of the top five tribes. But somehow "Tribes," in its print version, manages to be provocative without being interesting.
MAGAZINE
December 24, 1989
What a pleasant surprise to find "Fear and Reality in the Los Angeles Melting Pot" (by Joel Kotkin, Nov. 5). Congratulations--you have managed to capture the flavor and complexity of the demographic changes in the L.A. area. The overall positive portrayal is a refreshing change from other doom-and-gloom reports. The photos were beautiful. ANTONIA HERNANDEZ, PRESIDENT AND GENERAL COUNSEL, MEXICAN AMERICAN LEGAL DEFENSE AND EDUCATIONAL FUND, Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1998
Last week I found myself stalled in traffic on the Harbor Freeway. I chose to exit at Broadway and proceed across town to the Hollywood Freeway. It has been many years since I traversed Broadway. It was a shocking sight; I had the feeling of being in some rundown, Third World country. I was embarrassed by the fact this ugly site was in my home town. I locked my car doors. I thank Joel Kotkin for bringing it to our attention (Opinion, June 14). Our city fathers should be made aware of the fact that something must be done to clean up that awful mess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001
Joel Kotkin and Fred Siegel provide an interesting addition to the explanation for the attacks on the World Trade Center in focusing on the link between security and cities ("Attacks Threaten Future of Cities," Opinion, Oct. 14). They note that the threat of terrorism in large cities constitutes a fundamental threat to the American way of life and economy. Mohamed Atta, the suspected mastermind behind the attacks, studied urban planning for seven years in Germany. Could he have realized, either consciously or unconsciously, the Kotkin-Siegel thesis?
OPINION
December 14, 2005
Joel Kotkin criticizes Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa for re-imagining Los Angeles (Opinion, Dec. 13). Kotkin says that Angelenos want to live in a place more like Manhattan Beach than Manhattan. Kotkin is fixated on the wrong coast. Manhattan Beach has a greater population density (8,607 people per square mile) than L.A. (7,877). Backyards (if any) are like postage stamps. Why does this density work? Because Manhattan Beach's 19th century planners had Villaraigosa's 21st century views.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 1999
Joel Kotkin's comments on the dead city cores such as St. Louis and Detroit smell like racism (Opinion, Dec. 19). He seems to imply only poor and stupid folks would ever want to live in these cities. This coming from someone who works in Malibu. Who made these places unappealing? The rich and powerful, that's who. Industries ignore these cities in favor of going overseas for cheap labor. Why? Racism. It's still with us and is currently being endorsed in The Times. I can remember when working and living in the Mission District of San Francisco was not a popular idea.
OPINION
July 13, 2006
Re "Don't feed the white elephant," Current, July 9 Joel Kotkin feeds us his either/or philosophy: Either invest downtown (foolish) or invest in the region (wise). He thus continues the legacy of avant-garde planners who loved the idea that Los Angeles is a new type of metropolis, with numerous widely distributed centers, especially auto-oriented and certainly not "centered." But the evidence shows that the multiple centers are not coequals, and a maturing city must engage in both -- rather than either/or -- policies.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006
"An amazing triumph of will, engineering and greed, the horizontal version of New York's skyline, with its own kind of power and beauty, framed by the mountains and ocean." -- Joel Kotkin Irvine senior fellow, New America Foundation "At night it's a science-fiction wonderland. It feels like some huge, endless, lit-up computer grid with all kinds of magical possibilities. I also think that what you see out the window reflects you and your state of mind. You ask yourself: 'Am I really ready for this?
OPINION
December 14, 2005
Joel Kotkin criticizes Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa for re-imagining Los Angeles (Opinion, Dec. 13). Kotkin says that Angelenos want to live in a place more like Manhattan Beach than Manhattan. Kotkin is fixated on the wrong coast. Manhattan Beach has a greater population density (8,607 people per square mile) than L.A. (7,877). Backyards (if any) are like postage stamps. Why does this density work? Because Manhattan Beach's 19th century planners had Villaraigosa's 21st century views.
OPINION
September 10, 2005
Re "A New New Orleans," Current, Sept. 4 Joel Kotkin's piece is breathtaking in its ignorance. He says the wrong approach is to re-create New Orleans as a phony "Cajun Disneyland." It is now apparent that the French Quarter and Garden District escaped with minimal damage. These areas can and should be refurbished with no loss of authenticity. Kotkin recommends the city emulate the "ugly" prosperity of Houston. Houston's successes have hinged on access to surrounding rural land into which it has expanded.
OPINION
August 19, 2005
Re "Hip loftsters will stay lonely, for suburbs still seduce," Current, Aug. 14 Joel Kotkin seems to be arguing -- as he has for years -- that because Los Angeles has long been a city of suburbs, that it must always remain so. The throngs of people moving downtown obviously feel that analysis is quite wrong. And here's why: Younger generations are not interested in the commutes that sapped the life out of their parents. Singles and young couples want proximity to jobs, art and entertainment that can't be found in Kotkin's beloved suburbs.
OPINION
May 23, 2005
Re "We Don't Need a Cool Mayor," Commentary, May 19: Joel Kotkin urges Mayor-elect Antonio Villaraigosa to address critical local issues with the heat of passion and commitment. What Kotkin avoids is the heart of the problem: a corporate-dominated public policy of perpetual military and class warfare. This has generated a gross and growing maldistribution of wealth and power, growing indebtedness at all levels of government, a regressive tax system, suffering caused by cuts in funding and denial of vital public services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1992
As a member of the lay leadership in the Long Beach/West Orange County Jewish community, I found Joel Kotkin's treatise concerning "Paradise Reconsidered" (Opinion, July 26) and the Los Angeles Jewish community very informative. Kotkin forgot to mention three very important items, however. One is the fact that the majority of people in the Jewish community were as incensed as the Afro-American community when they witnessed the TV news film of the beating of Rodney King. Second, the Jewish community was equally shocked and disturbed by the verdicts received by the police officers involved.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1993
In their Opinion article (Jan. 24) on the aerospace industry, Joel Kotkin and David Friedman state that "Northrop, one of the large companies most committed to Los Angeles and a major employer in Rep. Maxine Waters' district, have found her virtually inaccessible when seeking help." As a matter of fact, Ms. Waters met with a senior Northrop executive shortly after the general election last November. She also has accepted our invitation to visit Northrop facilities in her district.
OPINION
October 16, 2004
Re "Up From Ultimate Urban Dystopia," Commentary, Oct. 11: Joel Kotkin and William H. Frey view explosive population growth in Southern California through rose-colored glasses. They say, "Since 2000, the L.A. region has added about 800,000 people from other parts of the U.S." This doesn't even count births and immigration from other countries, which would easily add another several hundred thousand people. They euphemistically call this problem "demographic dynamism." In reality, this population increase and the increases projected are disastrous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001
Joel Kotkin and Fred Siegel provide an interesting addition to the explanation for the attacks on the World Trade Center in focusing on the link between security and cities ("Attacks Threaten Future of Cities," Opinion, Oct. 14). They note that the threat of terrorism in large cities constitutes a fundamental threat to the American way of life and economy. Mohamed Atta, the suspected mastermind behind the attacks, studied urban planning for seven years in Germany. Could he have realized, either consciously or unconsciously, the Kotkin-Siegel thesis?
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