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Joel Makower

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July 30, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
More optimistic views of Woodstock than Barry Farrell's appear in Joel Makower's oral history. Makower collected scores of interviews during 1988, almost 20 years after the legendary music and arts festival where half a million people gathered. Makower was thorough in his research, including among the interviewees festival producers, performers, electricians, shopkeepers, lawyers, journalists, security officers and many more.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH
Here's a marketing challenge. Are tree trimmings and cut grass truly "waste" or "trash" or "garbage"? Using the wrong terminology might be one roadblock to recycling and composting, says Joel Makower, editor of the Green Consumer Letter. "Cut grass is no more 'filth' or 'junk' than is a fallen tree," Makower writes, arguing that more benign terms--"grass clippings" and the like--would prompt people to value these "leftovers" more. He called on "plain old American marketing know-how" to come up with more positive names.
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BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | DAVID E. KALISH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joel Makower's father, a longtime Sierra Club member, used to cringe when Joel and his sister left lights on in an empty room. So he asked his kids to pretend the light bulb was a Seven-Up bottle. Every time a bulb needlessly burned, the young Makower imagined he was spilling his favorite beverage down the drain. Decades later, the trick that spurred Makower to turn off the lights has evolved into a powerful tool for environmental change.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | DAVID E. KALISH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Joel Makower's father, a longtime Sierra Club member, used to cringe when Joel and his sister left lights on in an empty room. So he asked his kids to pretend the light bulb was a Seven-Up bottle. Every time a bulb needlessly burned, the young Makower imagined he was spilling his favorite beverage down the drain. Decades later, the trick that spurred Makower to turn off the lights has evolved into a powerful tool for environmental change.
BUSINESS
September 28, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH
Here's a marketing challenge. Are tree trimmings and cut grass truly "waste" or "trash" or "garbage"? Using the wrong terminology might be one roadblock to recycling and composting, says Joel Makower, editor of the Green Consumer Letter. "Cut grass is no more 'filth' or 'junk' than is a fallen tree," Makower writes, arguing that more benign terms--"grass clippings" and the like--would prompt people to value these "leftovers" more. He called on "plain old American marketing know-how" to come up with more positive names.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a new order of shopper in consumerland: Men and women on a mission, customers with a moral tone. Pushing their grocery carts up and down the supermarket aisles, they are the ultimate label-readers, examining bottles of detergent, dish-washing liquid, glass cleaner and air deodorizers for biodegradability and absence of phosphates, picking soaps and fabric softeners in refill packages or packs, choosing shampoo and toothpaste from companies that don't do animal testing.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you bought the green "degradable" trash bag only to hear on the evening news that it isn't, and that the company has been sued for false advertising? You bought the "environment-friendly" aerosol can only to read that all aerosols damage the environment? And you bought a dozen eggs in a "recyclable" Styrofoam carton only to discover that your community recyclers don't accept polystyrene in any form? Forget it, you mutter, environmental shopping is nothing but a lot of green hype.
BOOKS
February 16, 1992 | Charles Solomon
Both of these volumes offer listing of organizations, exhibits, sources of literature, etc. The attractively presented "Nature Catalogue" emphasizes the pleasures of ecologically oriented hobbies and how an interested amateur can work to improve the condition of the planet. "What Can I Do?" is more political in its subject matter--and more than a little hysterical in its tone.
BOOKS
April 24, 1988 | Marjorie Marks, Marks is a writer and former corporate business analyst for a Fortune 500 media company.
Our voracious collective appetite for news of ourselves is almost as intense as our drive for food, shelter and sex. No wonder the dawning of the Information Age feels so good. We love hearing about ourselves. Yet without some system for managing the ongoing deluge of data, the current information fest will diminish to mere "noise." Therein lies the new-age challenge addressed by "Trend Watching" authors John E.
BOOKS
February 16, 1992 | Charles Solomon
Both of these volumes offer listing of organizations, exhibits, sources of literature, etc. The attractively presented "Nature Catalogue" emphasizes the pleasures of ecologically oriented hobbies and how an interested amateur can work to improve the condition of the planet. "What Can I Do?" is more political in its subject matter--and more than a little hysterical in its tone.
NEWS
April 7, 1991 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you bought the green "degradable" trash bag only to hear on the evening news that it isn't, and that the company has been sued for false advertising? You bought the "environment-friendly" aerosol can only to read that all aerosols damage the environment? And you bought a dozen eggs in a "recyclable" Styrofoam carton only to discover that your community recyclers don't accept polystyrene in any form? Forget it, you mutter, environmental shopping is nothing but a lot of green hype.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | CONNIE KOENENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's a new order of shopper in consumerland: Men and women on a mission, customers with a moral tone. Pushing their grocery carts up and down the supermarket aisles, they are the ultimate label-readers, examining bottles of detergent, dish-washing liquid, glass cleaner and air deodorizers for biodegradability and absence of phosphates, picking soaps and fabric softeners in refill packages or packs, choosing shampoo and toothpaste from companies that don't do animal testing.
BOOKS
July 30, 1989 | SONJA BOLLE
More optimistic views of Woodstock than Barry Farrell's appear in Joel Makower's oral history. Makower collected scores of interviews during 1988, almost 20 years after the legendary music and arts festival where half a million people gathered. Makower was thorough in his research, including among the interviewees festival producers, performers, electricians, shopkeepers, lawyers, journalists, security officers and many more.
BOOKS
April 24, 1988 | Marjorie Marks, Marks is a writer and former corporate business analyst for a Fortune 500 media company.
Our voracious collective appetite for news of ourselves is almost as intense as our drive for food, shelter and sex. No wonder the dawning of the Information Age feels so good. We love hearing about ourselves. Yet without some system for managing the ongoing deluge of data, the current information fest will diminish to mere "noise." Therein lies the new-age challenge addressed by "Trend Watching" authors John E.
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