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Joel Marsden

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
When film director and writer Joel Marsden first heard about Watts, his reaction was unfortunately typical--fear. "The name 'Watts' has conjured up bad images that have traveled the world over," said Marsden, 27, who now sees the Watts neighborhood in a completely different light.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1997 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
When film director and writer Joel Marsden first heard about Watts, his reaction was unfortunately typical--fear. "The name 'Watts' has conjured up bad images that have traveled the world over," said Marsden, 27, who now sees the Watts neighborhood in a completely different light.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1998 | DAVID CHUTE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There are times when the indomitable drive to get a labor-of-love movie made and released is not a triumphant occurrence. We tend to hear only about the cases in which the filmmakers' faith was justified and noteworthy screen careers were launched. But what about the others? At times it might be a mercy to dash the aspirants' hopes, so that they can get on with their lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1997 | Christian Boone, Christian Boone is a Los Angeles-based freelance writer
What does a first-time director have in common with Steven Spielberg? A Baltimore clipper. Actually, Joel Marsden's soon-to-be-released feature "Ill Gotten Gains" has many striking similarities to Spielberg's planned December release, "Amistad," a fact-based account of an 1839 slave revolt by 53 Africans on the Spanish cargo ship Amistad. Marsden's film deals with a fictional slave uprising set in 1869. But each uses the same vessel, a replica of the C.W.
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | SUSAN VAUGHN, Vaughn is an author whose book "Los Angeles: Realm of Possibilities" is due out in 1991
Catch a ghost. Greet a ghoul. Hear vampires read their bloody prose. All Hallow Even is nigh and the Southland is spooked with events fun and fearsome. The Undead Poet's Society The room is dark. A white-faced ghoul in deadly black reads poetry by candelabra-light. Her guests sip wine, blood red, and listen in silence as shadows dance on every wall. This is the "Undead Poet's Society," sponsored by the Los Angeles Poetry Festival and featuring readings "by and about vampires."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 1998 | Greg Braxton, Greg Braxton is a Times staff writer
The anguished scream pierced through the auditorium at the Magic Johnson Theatres in Baldwin Hills like a white-hot sword during a first-weekend showing last December of the slavery drama "Amistad." With cries of "Oh, my God! Oh, my God!," an African American woman in her 50s rushed out of the packed theater in the middle of the film about a group of African slaves in 1839 who became the focus of a courtroom battle after staging a bloody mutiny against their captors.
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