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October 9, 1994 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
In 1977, artist Joel Otterson graduated from high school, moved to New York and enrolled at the Parsons School of Design. That was the year punk broke, and there was a strong relationship then between New York's community of young artists and the highly conceptual punk scene. You'd assume an artist with Otterson's interest in pop culture spent his nights at CBGB seeing Talking Heads and Television, but you'd be wrong.
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November 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Joel Otterson's trash-to-treasure lighting fixtures are illuminating in ways that typical hobby craft rarely is. While the sculptures -- especially two recent chandeliers (there's also a table lamp and a wall sconce) - employ found objects familiar from standard assemblage techniques, they also spin wry social and conceptual riffs. At Maloney Fine Art, the chandeliers are constructed from thrift-shop and garage-sale glassware - cut, etched or pressed glass goblets, stemware, sherry and wine glasses and more.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
New York-based Joel Otterson makes sculpture from ordinary plumbing pipe in plastic and copper. That would appear to limit his aesthetic to rhapsodic utility, but in fact he gets a lot of mileage from it. "Emotional Slaughter" evokes a kind of mordant Chinese science fiction, "Antique Furniture" uses sewer pipe to call up primitive art and "Atomic Fact" distills the scary complexity of the nuclear reactor.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1994 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
In 1977, artist Joel Otterson graduated from high school, moved to New York and enrolled at the Parsons School of Design. That was the year punk broke, and there was a strong relationship then between New York's community of young artists and the highly conceptual punk scene. You'd assume an artist with Otterson's interest in pop culture spent his nights at CBGB seeing Talking Heads and Television, but you'd be wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Times art critic
Joel Otterson's trash-to-treasure lighting fixtures are illuminating in ways that typical hobby craft rarely is. While the sculptures -- especially two recent chandeliers (there's also a table lamp and a wall sconce) - employ found objects familiar from standard assemblage techniques, they also spin wry social and conceptual riffs. At Maloney Fine Art, the chandeliers are constructed from thrift-shop and garage-sale glassware - cut, etched or pressed glass goblets, stemware, sherry and wine glasses and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Brutality and luxury intermingle in Joel Otterson's polymorphous pieces of excessively decorative yet fully functional furniture. Mounted on small, heavy-duty wheels, his hyperactive hybrids of recycled pipes, dismembered bathtubs, patchwork cushions, potted plants and goldfish bowls speak--in many voices at once--of an irrepressible desire for physical comfort in a world relentlessly hostile to pleasure, refinement and lavishness.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1994 | Christopher Knight, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic. and
Herewith, in no particular order, the 10 events, episodes and issues most significant for the Los Angeles art world in 1994: Dynamic Duo: Simultaneous retrospectives of the pivotal work of Bruce Nauman and Mike Kelley at the Museum of Contemporary Art and the L.A. County Museum of Art, respectively, made for a knockout summer museum season, while definitively underscoring the continuing international significance of art made in Los Angeles.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Is this the new thing? These New York reruns of Op, Pop, Warhol and Duchamp? Must be. Why else would concurrent exhibitions of them have overtaken three of our best galleries? "Paravision," a big, bright group show, has swept into Margo Leavin's Hilldale Avenue gallery (to Aug. 23) with a blaze of color, a shot of audacity and a printed statement so opaque that it must be a parody of artspeak. Never mind.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1994 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
Can a former Red Car trolley station be the savior of Southern California's depressed gallery scene? Hop on board to find out. Next stop: Bergamot Station. The new Santa Monica arts complex, developed by contemporary art dealer Wayne Blank of the Shoshana Wayne Gallery, is scheduled to open Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details. Timing isn't everything, but it is something, and the timing of the new Hammer Museum biennial couldn't be better. Having spent much of the last year looking at L.A. art made by post-World War II generations that laid the groundwork for the city's explosive cultural ripening in the 1980s, via the multiple-museum extravaganza that was Pacific Standard Time, now we get a cross-section of recent art made a generation later.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Brutality and luxury intermingle in Joel Otterson's polymorphous pieces of excessively decorative yet fully functional furniture. Mounted on small, heavy-duty wheels, his hyperactive hybrids of recycled pipes, dismembered bathtubs, patchwork cushions, potted plants and goldfish bowls speak--in many voices at once--of an irrepressible desire for physical comfort in a world relentlessly hostile to pleasure, refinement and lavishness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1987 | WILLIAM WILSON
New York-based Joel Otterson makes sculpture from ordinary plumbing pipe in plastic and copper. That would appear to limit his aesthetic to rhapsodic utility, but in fact he gets a lot of mileage from it. "Emotional Slaughter" evokes a kind of mordant Chinese science fiction, "Antique Furniture" uses sewer pipe to call up primitive art and "Atomic Fact" distills the scary complexity of the nuclear reactor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 1996
ART Through June 16: "The Enduring Spirit: Art of the Holocaust," Simon Wiesenthal Center, Museum of Tolerance. Through June 23: "Chan Ky-Yut," Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena. * "Images of an Era: Selections From the Permanent Collection," Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, Little Tokyo. Also at the Geffen: "Hall of Mirrors: Art and Film Since 1945," through July 28. Through July 7: "Doris Ulmann: Photography and Folklore," J. Paul Getty Museum, Malibu.
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