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Joel Peter Witkin

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January 1, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Joel-Peter Witkin's volatile photographs are considered to be the very cutting edge of the art form by some--and dismissed as flagrant pornography by others. Diving head first into deeply rooted fears that contemporary artists like Ed Kienholz and David Lynch only hint at, Witkin taps into the same current of demonic power that churned through Bosch and Goya.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989
Kristine McKenna's otherwise fine article, "Joel-Peter Witkin: Peering Over the Abyss" (Jan. 1), states that a Los Angeles gallery will present his first Southern California show. In fact, the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art hosted an exhibition of Witkin's work from Feb. 27 through April 19 in 1987, "Joel-Peter Witkin: Forty Photographs." DIANE MAXWELL La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1989
Kristine McKenna's otherwise fine article, "Joel-Peter Witkin: Peering Over the Abyss" (Jan. 1), states that a Los Angeles gallery will present his first Southern California show. In fact, the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art hosted an exhibition of Witkin's work from Feb. 27 through April 19 in 1987, "Joel-Peter Witkin: Forty Photographs." DIANE MAXWELL La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989
Gee, Calendar, what a hell of a way to greet the New Year--with an article about good old J.P. Witkin ("Joel-Peter Witkin: Peering Over the Abyss," by Kristine McKenna, Jan. 1). Yes, folks, here he is: The man who manipulates and mutilates human and animal cadavers for use as props in his "art" (see American Photographer magazine, 1986, for info about this). I guess we should be heartened by the news that he's now using living (and volunteering) models. I'm not surprised that he wears a mask in photos.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989
Gee, Calendar, what a hell of a way to greet the New Year--with an article about good old J.P. Witkin ("Joel-Peter Witkin: Peering Over the Abyss," by Kristine McKenna, Jan. 1). Yes, folks, here he is: The man who manipulates and mutilates human and animal cadavers for use as props in his "art" (see American Photographer magazine, 1986, for info about this). I guess we should be heartened by the news that he's now using living (and volunteering) models. I'm not surprised that he wears a mask in photos.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 1994 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the 19th Century, European aristocrats amused themselves after dinner by dressing up as figures in famous paintings and staging detailed tableaux vivants . The makers of "Diatom: A PhotoGraphic Novel" update this impulse to imitate images by dressing models in comic-book costumes, posing them on elaborate sci-fi sets and photographing them in comic-strip sequences.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
Sometimes critics deserve something equivalent to military "combat pay"--not because of physical danger, but because of psychological assaults. Joel-Peter Witkin's photographs are not for everyone. They are the stuff of nightmares. I have even heard supporters express "regret" that they favor some of his composed and manipulated images, 40 of which are now on view in the Lynn G. Fayman Gallery at the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1988 | KRISTINE McKENNA
One of the great things about dogs--or more specifically, dog walking--is the way they afford a person who's basically just nosing around or getting the lay of the land a visible excuse for loitering on a public street with nothing to do. This observation was brought home by "The Dog Show," an exhibition of photographs of dogs dating from 1865 through the present by 32 prominent photographers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 1998
Explanatory Works: If you discount their exploitativeness, cut-and-paste aesthetic, belabored hipness and rather remarkable ugliness, you might find a way to like Joel Peter Witkin's photographs--but then again, there wouldn't be much left not to like. PaceWildenstein, however, has put together a well-edited survey of works by this postmodern pasticheur that offends less than usual and at least begins to explain the devotion of Witkin's legions of fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL
The allure of the ideal is matched by the allure of the misshapen: deformed lemons with ulcerated skins; tortured bits of volcanic debris in which one can see romantic landscapes; hydrocephalic children with flowerlike heads; bottled organs preserved on dust-caked shelves; and aberrant skeletons that may not be for real.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1989 | KRISTINE McKENNA
Joel-Peter Witkin's volatile photographs are considered to be the very cutting edge of the art form by some--and dismissed as flagrant pornography by others. Diving head first into deeply rooted fears that contemporary artists like Ed Kienholz and David Lynch only hint at, Witkin taps into the same current of demonic power that churned through Bosch and Goya.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
Joel-Peter Witkin is accustomed to dealing with "the monster issue." You can't make repulsive images of sexual freaks, kissing corpses and sadomasochistic torture without developing an image problem. But he insists that he hasn't encountered much public response--negative or otherwise. That may change, now that an exhibition of his work is at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (through Feb.
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