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Joel Strote

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NEWS
August 19, 1988 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
Question: Are you stating now that he left the party before it was over? Answer: When Liberace leaves . . . the party is over. That is what I am saying. --Dorothy McMahon, Liberace's maid, testifying about pianist's last Christmas. Celebrity is to Las Vegas what steel is to Pittsburgh. Here in the kingdom of Wayne and Frank, a city of excessive light and hyperbole, entertainers are fed to the strip's neon maw and made over as celebrities, as living legends. Immortals.
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NEWS
August 19, 1988 | PETER H. KING, Times Staff Writer
Question: Are you stating now that he left the party before it was over? Answer: When Liberace leaves . . . the party is over. That is what I am saying. --Dorothy McMahon, Liberace's maid, testifying about pianist's last Christmas. Celebrity is to Las Vegas what steel is to Pittsburgh. Here in the kingdom of Wayne and Frank, a city of excessive light and hyperbole, entertainers are fed to the strip's neon maw and made over as celebrities, as living legends. Immortals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1988
The executor of Liberace's estate has sued the late entertainer's personal manager to prevent him from disclosing confidential facts in a television movie about the pianist, according to court documents. The suit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court by Joel Strote, also seeks unspecified damages from Seymour Heller, Liberace's personal manager for 36 years, for allegedly interfering with Strote's efforts to produce a television movie about the entertainer.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | United Press International
Beverly Hills entertainment attorney Joel Strote won a court challenge Tuesday that sought to remove him as trustee of the multimillion-dollar Liberace trusts. "The evidence shows the job Mr. Strote did as trustee is an excellent job," said U.S. District Judge Michael Wendell. Liberace died of AIDS Feb. 4, 1987, two weeks after signing a new will that Strote drafted naming himself as executor and trustee.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A Los Angeles attorney has stolen hundreds of thousands of dollars from Liberace's estate after orchestrating a will the late entertainer did not want or comprehend, a lawyer for five Liberace associates said Monday. Los Angeles attorney Joel Strote executed Liberace's will 13 days before the multimillionaire's death, and the performer had no idea what he was signing, attorney Harold Gewerter charged in opening statements of a civil suit in Nevada district court here.
NEWS
August 17, 1988 | United Press International
Beverly Hills entertainment attorney Joel Strote won a court challenge Tuesday that sought to remove him as trustee of the multimillion-dollar Liberace trusts. "The evidence shows the job Mr. Strote did as trustee is an excellent job," said U.S. District Judge Michael Wendell. Liberace died of AIDS Feb. 4, 1987, two weeks after signing a new will that Strote drafted naming himself as executor and trustee.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Liberace's attorney testified Tuesday that he made more than $400,000 in legal fees in 1987 for his work on the late entertainer's estate and trusts. Beverly Hills attorney Joel Strote defended the fees as reasonable for the amount of work he did as executor of Liberace's estate and trustee for two trusts set up by the famed pianist. "This was anything but a windfall," said Strote, who billed the estate $58,475 in one month alone.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Associated Press
The executor of Liberace's estate said he made a trip to Switzerland a year ago to check out the late entertainer's Swiss bank account, calling the trip "a very sensitive mission." Joel Strote said he wanted to check the files in Zurich personally because he was concerned "that the income may not have been reported." Strote did not expand on the statement. His testimony continued Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Liberace was so gravely ill the day he signed his revised will and trust that he could not find his way back to his bed from the bathroom, a nurse who cared for the entertainer in his dying days testified Wednesday. Liberace could barely talk and could not physically put on his glasses or hold a book to read in the final two weeks before he died, nurse Norma Gerber said. "He was a dying man. He needed a lot of tender, loving care," Gerber said. "He couldn't have a conversation; he was too sick.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Associated Press
The attorney for five friends of the late Liberace charged today that Los Angeles attorney Joel Strote orchestrated a deathbed will that allowed him to steal hundreds of thousands of dollars from the entertainer's estate. In a civil suit, attorney Harold Geweter contended that Strote executed the multimillionaire's will on Jan. 22, 13 days before Liberace's death, and that the entertainer had no idea what he was signing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1988
The executor of Liberace's estate has sued the late entertainer's personal manager to prevent him from disclosing confidential facts in a television movie about the pianist, according to court documents. The suit, filed in Los Angeles Superior Court by Joel Strote, also seeks unspecified damages from Seymour Heller, Liberace's personal manager for 36 years, for allegedly interfering with Strote's efforts to produce a television movie about the entertainer.
NEWS
April 28, 1988 | Associated Press
Liberace was so gravely ill the day he signed his revised will and trust that he could not find his way back to his bed from the bathroom, a nurse who cared for the entertainer in his dying days testified Wednesday. Liberace could barely talk and could not physically put on his glasses or hold a book to read in the final two weeks before he died, nurse Norma Gerber said. "He was a dying man. He needed a lot of tender, loving care," Gerber said. "He couldn't have a conversation; he was too sick.
NEWS
April 27, 1988 | Associated Press
Liberace's attorney testified Tuesday that he made more than $400,000 in legal fees in 1987 for his work on the late entertainer's estate and trusts. Beverly Hills attorney Joel Strote defended the fees as reasonable for the amount of work he did as executor of Liberace's estate and trustee for two trusts set up by the famed pianist. "This was anything but a windfall," said Strote, who billed the estate $58,475 in one month alone.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | Associated Press
The executor of Liberace's estate said he made a trip to Switzerland a year ago to check out the late entertainer's Swiss bank account, calling the trip "a very sensitive mission." Joel Strote said he wanted to check the files in Zurich personally because he was concerned "that the income may not have been reported." Strote did not expand on the statement. His testimony continued Tuesday afternoon.
NEWS
April 19, 1988 | Associated Press
A Los Angeles attorney has stolen hundreds of thousands of dollars from Liberace's estate after orchestrating a will the late entertainer did not want or comprehend, a lawyer for five Liberace associates said Monday. Los Angeles attorney Joel Strote executed Liberace's will 13 days before the multimillionaire's death, and the performer had no idea what he was signing, attorney Harold Gewerter charged in opening statements of a civil suit in Nevada district court here.
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | Associated Press
The former secretary to the executor of Liberace's estate testified Tuesday that the executor overbilled the estate, had her fill out blank quitclaim deeds signed by the entertainer and tore up a receipt closing out his Swiss bank account. Helaine Golding said she copied some Liberace estate transactions while working in the office of Beverly Hills attorney Joel Strote because she felt that some of Strote's actions were illegal.
NEWS
February 14, 1987 | Associated Press
Entertainer Liberace's multimillion-dollar estate will be placed in a trust and the main benefactor will be the foundation he created to support students in the creative arts, his lawyer said Friday. "The bulk of his estate will go to the Liberace Foundation for the Performing and Creative Arts because of his love for enhancing students' lives," attorney Joel Strote said. "He always felt the foundation was his greatest accomplishment." The five-page will was drawn Jan.
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