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Joel Tauber

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December 25, 2004 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
Picture Woody Allen in a wetsuit swimming with sharks and you begin to grasp the contradictions embodied by Los Angeles' resident highbrow argonaut, Joel Tauber. The 32-year-old Conceptual artist can't brew a decent cup of coffee, and he uses the wrong remote control to bring down the volume on his TV because he's been, for some time now, preoccupied with weightier concerns.
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March 10, 2007 | Sharon Mizota, Special to The Times
Artist Joel Tauber was captivated the first time he laid eyes on the little sycamore in the middle of the Rose Bowl parking lot. "It struck me on a metaphorical level," he says. "It just seemed like this forgotten figure in this sea of asphalt, and that seemed indicative of where we are environmentally." Since that day two years ago, Tauber has devoted his life and art to the tree. He began watering it and installed metal railings to protect it from cars. Now he is helping it reproduce.
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NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
THE term "caveman art" might bring to mind crudely rendered hunting scenes etched onto stone, but Joel Tauber is a different kind of a caveman, and his art is just as unusual. The 33-year-old fine-arts graduate of Yale and Pasadena's Art Center College of Design rents out living space that's been carved from the side of a hill in Eagle Rock, and seldom have human and habitat been so aptly joined.
NEWS
August 25, 2005 | Mark Sachs, Times Staff Writer
THE term "caveman art" might bring to mind crudely rendered hunting scenes etched onto stone, but Joel Tauber is a different kind of a caveman, and his art is just as unusual. The 33-year-old fine-arts graduate of Yale and Pasadena's Art Center College of Design rents out living space that's been carved from the side of a hill in Eagle Rock, and seldom have human and habitat been so aptly joined.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 2007 | Sharon Mizota, Special to The Times
Artist Joel Tauber was captivated the first time he laid eyes on the little sycamore in the middle of the Rose Bowl parking lot. "It struck me on a metaphorical level," he says. "It just seemed like this forgotten figure in this sea of asphalt, and that seemed indicative of where we are environmentally." Since that day two years ago, Tauber has devoted his life and art to the tree. He began watering it and installed metal railings to protect it from cars. Now he is helping it reproduce.
NEWS
September 7, 2012 | By Lisa Boone
Created to whet your appetite for the Ken Price ceramics retrospective opening Sept. 16 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, "The Planter Show" opened Thursday with a delightful collection of more than 200 handmade plant containers by established and emerging artists.  "We wanted to give people another layer of context to the Price show," said Bettina Korek, director of the arts events group ForYourArt , at the opening Thursday night.  ...
MAGAZINE
September 16, 2007 | ELIZABETH KHURI, Elizabeth Khuri is assistant style editor of West.
HOW IT WORKS: Lauri Firstenberg founded the nonprofit LAXART two years ago to help both new and midcareer artists produce and showcase their work. Artists who collaborate with LAXART have had their work installed in LAXART's gallery-style space on La Cienega Boulevard and as temporary projects atop billboards, across freeway walls and, in the case of Joel Tauber, surrounded by pavement in the Rose Bowl parking lot.
NEWS
November 27, 1999 | From Associated Press
In the decades after World War II, the United Jewish Appeal had it easy. American Jews horrified by the Holocaust and fervent in their support for Israel poured hundreds of millions of dollars a year into the coffers of the UJA, by far the largest Jewish fund-raising group in the nation. But today, in an age obsessed with quick results and individual control, donors are far less eager to open their checkbooks for large, impersonal annual campaigns.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2005 | Leah Ollman, Special to The Times
In its title, at least, the exhibition "Still, Things Fall From the Sky" pushes all the right post-9/11 emotional buttons. It conjures a sense of tenuousness and random tragedy. The show itself, encompassing the work of 12 photographers, sculptors, painters and installation and video artists at UC Riverside's California Museum of Photography, ends up evoking randomness, all right, but not of a productively destabilizing sort.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2007 | Holly Myers, Special to The Times
In an era of near-epidemic distraction, with media, advertising and various technological gadgets drawing the attention of the average individual in a dozen different directions at any given moment, the visual arts have become a haven for what may prove a radical, even profound, form of resistance: unmitigated obsession.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2004 | Hugh Hart, Special to The Times
Picture Woody Allen in a wetsuit swimming with sharks and you begin to grasp the contradictions embodied by Los Angeles' resident highbrow argonaut, Joel Tauber. The 32-year-old Conceptual artist can't brew a decent cup of coffee, and he uses the wrong remote control to bring down the volume on his TV because he's been, for some time now, preoccupied with weightier concerns.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
The 2004 California Biennial, which opened Tuesday at the Orange County Museum of Art in Newport Beach, means to send a message. It offers recent work by 28 young artists from around the state, as any biennial might do; but it also intends to declare that this particular museum, which has been less than vigorous for many years, is back on its feet. Mostly it succeeds. With 120 works by more than twice as many artists as were included in 2002, the show is the biggest ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2004 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
With just 24 paintings -- four each by six artists -- "The Los Angeles School" is a thumbnail sketch of a powerful period for Abstract art. On the 40th anniversary of the landmark survey exhibition, "California Hard Edge Painting," organized in 1964 for the old Newport Harbor Art Museum (now the Orange County Museum of Art) by the insightful and influential art critic Jules Langsner, the Ben Maltz Gallery at Otis College of Art and Design has assembled the show as a small but potent homage.
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