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Joey Cora

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May 22, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Joey Cora, the Padres' rookie second baseman, has been as cheerful as a mummy this week, saying pessimistic things such as: "I'm getting sent down to the minors, man. I have one more game before I go." For a rookie, he's pretty astute, because the Padres aren't sure what to do with him. If only they understood him, they might have made a decision by now. Cora, a Double-A second baseman only a season ago, is considered arrogant, stubborn and unapproachable by the coaches and manager.
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SPORTS
September 1, 1998 | From Associated Press
Adding another second baseman to bolster a playoff run, the Cleveland Indians acquired Joey Cora from the Seattle Mariners on Monday in a trade for David Bell. Cora, 33, an all-star last season, has appeared in the playoffs two of the last three years since joining the Mariners in 1995. Cora became the Indians' 15th second baseman since they traded Carlos Baerga to the Mets in 1996.
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SPORTS
June 23, 1986 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
Joey Cora could have been killed. Late Saturday night, after he went hitless in a Double-A minor league game at San Antonio, Cora--the Padres' No. 1 pick in the 1985 draft and supposedly ticketed for the major leagues in one or two years--left the clubhouse to wait for the team bus. He was joined by teammates Sandy Alomar Jr., Candy Sierra and Eric Hardgrave. A couple of guys--they'd never seen them before--came by and yelled something nasty. They continued to taunt.
SPORTS
June 6, 1998 | JASON REID
Tears came to Joey Cora when he heard the news Thursday night, but the Seattle Mariner second baseman quickly composed himself. He had a call to make. Cora phoned his mother in Puerto Rico to confirm that his younger brother, Alex, had been called up by the Dodgers. Then the tears resumed. "It was 1 a.m. [in Puerto Rico] when I called her, so I knew it was true if she was still up," Cora said. "She told me, 'Yes, he's going to the Dodgers.' That was a great feeling."
SPORTS
March 16, 1988 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
He keeps to himself, mostly. He has taken to wearing glasses, but nobody much notices. It appears he is growing a beard, but nobody has said anything. For goodness sakes, his alma mater made the NCAA basketball tournament for the first time in a millenium, but he can't even brag because nobody will listen. "Ah, they got a bad draw," said Joey Cora, Vanderbilt University, 1984. "They'll win the first game, but then they've got to play Pittsburgh." A bad draw. Cora knows the feeling.
SPORTS
March 9, 1989 | BILL PLASCHKE, Times Staff Writer
Among other things, one sign that you have become a big league baseball player is that you no longer have a stranger's signature in your glove. There are no Willie Mays Models here, no Mickey Mantle Special Editions, no Pee Wee Reese Limiteds. Big leaguers are contractually bound to prefer nothing fancier on their defense weapons than "Rawlings" or "Wilson" or whoever is paying them. That is, most big leaguers. One exception is Padre infielder Joey Cora. His glove is a Wayne Gretzky model.
SPORTS
June 15, 1990 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He walked out to the plate, all of 5-feet-8 and 150 pounds, and assumed the position. Joey Cora, catcher. Mark Parent was in the dugout, having been lifted in the seventh for a pinch-hitter. Benito Santiago was on his way to the hospital, where X-rays would reveal a broken arm. The Giants were getting ready to bat in the eighth, and the Padres were wondering what they were going to do now that both of their catchers were gone. Reliever Mark Grant was warming up, throwing to Parent.
SPORTS
October 9, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Seattle second baseman Joey Cora was on the long and the short end of the Mariners' 6-5 victory. The diminutive infielder homered to right field in the third inning, only the eighth homer of his career, to give Seattle a 1-0 lead, and he started the game-winning rally in the 11th with a bunt single down the left-field line. The bunt was an identical replay of the two bunt singles Cora had in Game 4, when he tapped the ball toward first base and eluded Don Mattingly's tags.
SPORTS
June 3, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER
Is it the bat? Is it the stance? Is it the attitude? When a player goes on a hitting streak, everybody tries to figure out what's making him so hot. In the case of Seattle Mariner second baseman Joey Cora, the speculation included one factor never before considered in the history of major league baseball. Was it Wally, the Green Monster? Cora's streak stretched to 24 games before it ended Friday, the longest by an American League switch-hitter. Cora was hitting only .
SPORTS
June 6, 1998 | JASON REID
Tears came to Joey Cora when he heard the news Thursday night, but the Seattle Mariner second baseman quickly composed himself. He had a call to make. Cora phoned his mother in Puerto Rico to confirm that his younger brother, Alex, had been called up by the Dodgers. Then the tears resumed. "It was 1 a.m. [in Puerto Rico] when I called her, so I knew it was true if she was still up," Cora said. "She told me, 'Yes, he's going to the Dodgers.' That was a great feeling."
SPORTS
June 3, 1997 | STEVE SPRINGER
Is it the bat? Is it the stance? Is it the attitude? When a player goes on a hitting streak, everybody tries to figure out what's making him so hot. In the case of Seattle Mariner second baseman Joey Cora, the speculation included one factor never before considered in the history of major league baseball. Was it Wally, the Green Monster? Cora's streak stretched to 24 games before it ended Friday, the longest by an American League switch-hitter. Cora was hitting only .
SPORTS
May 20, 1997 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel Manager Terry Collins was asked before Monday night's game how he planned to pitch to Ken Griffey Jr., the Seattle Mariner phenom who is on a pace to hit 71 home runs and drive in 195 runs. "I haven't the faintest idea," Collins said. Funny, but no one asked Collins how he would pitch to Joey Cora, the Mariners' 5-foot-8, 162-pound second baseman. Cora may be an afterthought in one of baseball's most potent lineups, but the No.
SPORTS
October 9, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Seattle second baseman Joey Cora was on the long and the short end of the Mariners' 6-5 victory. The diminutive infielder homered to right field in the third inning, only the eighth homer of his career, to give Seattle a 1-0 lead, and he started the game-winning rally in the 11th with a bunt single down the left-field line. The bunt was an identical replay of the two bunt singles Cora had in Game 4, when he tapped the ball toward first base and eluded Don Mattingly's tags.
SPORTS
October 12, 1993 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ozzie Guillen dragged himself out of bed each winter morning, bundled himself in the heaviest clothing he owns, and drove in the freezing temperatures to Comiskey Park. It was a lonely, agonizing time, particularly since there was no guarantee he would ever play baseball again. He was the All-Star shortstop of the Chicago White Sox, but with torn anterior cruciate and medial collateral ligaments in his right knee, he couldn't help but wonder if he was wasting his time.
SPORTS
April 1, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Padres, distraught over their pitching woes this spring, made a desperate attempt to bolster their staff Sunday night by acquiring left-handed reliever Steve Rosenberg and starter Adam Peterson from the Chicago White Sox in exchange for infielder Joey Cora and two minor-league players. OK, so it's not exactly like getting Dave Stewart and Dennis Eckersley, the Padres admit, but at the very least, they now have two more candidates for their staff.
SPORTS
March 1, 1991 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Diego Padre infielder Joey Cora, who is expected to win a spot on the roster as a utility player, already has proven to be the biggest surprise in training camp simply by his presence. This is a guy who suffered a fractured left leg during winter ball in a collision at first base. This is a guy who needed three screws placed into his leg to help mend the fracture because it wasn't healing properly. This is a guy Joe McIlvaine, Padre General Manager, predicted might not be ready before June.
SPORTS
May 26, 1987 | TOM FRIEND, Times Staff Writer
"He ripped me, didn't he?" asked rookie Joey Cora, who, by now, knows the nuances of his manager, Larry Bowa. And Bowa ripped him all right, because as far as Bowa's concerned, Cora goofed up in Monday night's game against the Philadelphia Phillies. The Phillies won it, 6-4, on shortstop Luis Aguayo's two home runs, but Bowa remembers the fifth inning, when the Padres had John Kruk on first base and Cora on third with no outs. And they didn't score.
SPORTS
May 20, 1997 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angel Manager Terry Collins was asked before Monday night's game how he planned to pitch to Ken Griffey Jr., the Seattle Mariner phenom who is on a pace to hit 71 home runs and drive in 195 runs. "I haven't the faintest idea," Collins said. Funny, but no one asked Collins how he would pitch to Joey Cora, the Mariners' 5-foot-8, 162-pound second baseman. Cora may be an afterthought in one of baseball's most potent lineups, but the No.
SPORTS
June 15, 1990 | SCOTT MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He walked out to the plate, all of 5-feet-8 and 150 pounds, and assumed the position. Joey Cora, catcher. Mark Parent was in the dugout, having been lifted in the seventh for a pinch-hitter. Benito Santiago was on his way to the hospital, where X-rays would reveal a broken arm. The Giants were getting ready to bat in the eighth, and the Padres were wondering what they were going to do now that both of their catchers were gone. Reliever Mark Grant was warming up, throwing to Parent.
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