Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoey Olivo
IN THE NEWS

Joey Olivo

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
March 30, 1985 | United Press International
Joey Olivo of Los Angeles Friday night became the first United States fighter ever to win the world light-flyweight championship, dethroning Francisco Quiroz of the Dominican Republic in 15 rounds. Olivo won a unanimous decision with judge Rogerio Perez scoring it 145-142, judge Roberto Ramirez 143-142 and referee Carlos Berrical 145-143.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While his friends grew up battling rival gang members on the streets of East Los Angeles, Joey Olivo fought for his barrio another way. Olivo's bouts were in the ring. At age 15, he put aside gang life and launched a successful career in professional boxing, becoming the only U.S. fighter ever to hold a world junior-flyweight title. In the neighborhood, he quickly rose to legendary status. On Thursday, the legend returned home.
Advertisement
SPORTS
May 14, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Boxing's junior-flyweight division requires little of its contenders. You can get by with a supersonic metabolism, a tolerance for anonymity and the willingness to work for minimum wages when everybody else in boxing is pulling down million-dollar purses and griping about it. In other words, the division's requirements are not quite the same as the heavyweight division's. Take the metabolism.
SPORTS
June 14, 1988
Joey Olivo, the World Boxing Assn. junior flyweight champion, scored a unanimous 12-round decision to win the North American Boxing Federation flyweight championship over Fernando Varguez Monday night at the Forum. Olivo, 112, from Los Angeles, easily outpointed Varguez, of Meridan, Mexico, winning by large margins on all three judges' cards. Varquez, 112, slipped to 30-5-1 with 23 knockouts. Olivo, ranked No. 2 by the NABF, improved his record to 38-5 with nine knockouts.
SPORTS
June 14, 1988
Joey Olivo, the World Boxing Assn. junior flyweight champion, scored a unanimous 12-round decision to win the North American Boxing Federation flyweight championship over Fernando Varguez Monday night at the Forum. Olivo, 112, from Los Angeles, easily outpointed Varguez, of Meridan, Mexico, winning by large margins on all three judges' cards. Varquez, 112, slipped to 30-5-1 with 23 knockouts. Olivo, ranked No. 2 by the NABF, improved his record to 38-5 with nine knockouts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | JOCELYN Y. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While his friends grew up battling rival gang members on the streets of East Los Angeles, Joey Olivo fought for his barrio another way. Olivo's bouts were in the ring. At age 15, he put aside gang life and launched a successful career in professional boxing, becoming the only U.S. fighter ever to hold a world junior-flyweight title. In the neighborhood, he quickly rose to legendary status. On Thursday, the legend returned home.
MAGAZINE
February 2, 1986 | RICHARD HOFFER, Richard Hoffer is a sportswriter for The Times
Joey Olivo, a one-time East Los Angeles gang member, is the only U.S. fighter to ever hold a world junior-flyweight title. He won the WBA championship in March, 1985, but lost it in December in Seoul on a split decision to Yu Myong Yu of South Korea. In his career, he has made few headlines and little money. When not boxing, he works part time in a dental lab in Los Angeles Q: Why have we heard so little about you in this country?
MAGAZINE
February 2, 1986 | RICHARD HOFFER, Richard Hoffer is a sportswriter for The Times
Joey Olivo, a one-time East Los Angeles gang member, is the only U.S. fighter to ever hold a world junior-flyweight title. He won the WBA championship in March, 1985, but lost it in December in Seoul on a split decision to Yu Myong Yu of South Korea. In his career, he has made few headlines and little money. When not boxing, he works part time in a dental lab in Los Angeles Q: Why have we heard so little about you in this country?
SPORTS
May 14, 1985 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Boxing's junior-flyweight division requires little of its contenders. You can get by with a supersonic metabolism, a tolerance for anonymity and the willingness to work for minimum wages when everybody else in boxing is pulling down million-dollar purses and griping about it. In other words, the division's requirements are not quite the same as the heavyweight division's. Take the metabolism.
SPORTS
March 30, 1985 | United Press International
Joey Olivo of Los Angeles Friday night became the first United States fighter ever to win the world light-flyweight championship, dethroning Francisco Quiroz of the Dominican Republic in 15 rounds. Olivo won a unanimous decision with judge Rogerio Perez scoring it 145-142, judge Roberto Ramirez 143-142 and referee Carlos Berrical 145-143.
SPORTS
December 6, 1985 | GORDON EDES, Times Staff Writer
The hand is healed and the dream is no longer deferred for Paul Gonzales. At last, 16 months after winning an Olympic gold medal, the timetable toward professional success is accelerating for the boxer from East Los Angeles. Before an estimated crowd of 1,500 at the Hollywood Palladium Thursday night, Gonzales breezed to a unanimous, eight-round decision over Joey Roach of Boston in only his second professional fight.
SPORTS
March 3, 1985
A major controversy hit the home of the Olympic movement Saturday after doping tests on six Greek athletes proved positive on the eve of the European indoor track and field championships. The tests were carried out at the University of Athens Feb. 27 on the instructions of SEGAS, the Greek Athletics Federation, to avoid any possible embarrassment at the indoor championships. But the results of the tests have caused an uproar.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|