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Joey Sellers

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is it going to take for Joey Sellers to get the recognition he so richly deserves? The gifted trombonist-composer brought his 11-piece Jazz Aggregation to the pleasant ambience of Huntington Beach's El Matador on Wednesday night for one of its too-rare engagements. And, as it almost always does, the group played a sizzling program before an enthusiastic but somewhat less-than-capacity crowd.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joey Sellers abhors the routine, relishes the unconventional. That's why when he leads his jazz quartet, he rarely follows the usual pattern that's called "head-solos-head," where the musicians play a song's melody ("head"), then offer improvised solos, then close with the melody once again. "I see our quartet as being in a chamber-esque sort of mode," Sellers said . "We break things down within a set, within a song, changing colors, textures."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joey Sellers abhors the routine, relishes the unconventional. That's why when he leads his jazz quartet, he rarely follows the usual pattern that's called "head-solos-head," where the musicians play a song's melody ("head"), then offer improvised solos, then close with the melody once again. "I see our quartet as being in a chamber-esque sort of mode," Sellers said . "We break things down within a set, within a song, changing colors, textures."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trombonist Joey Sellers is ready to dismantle jazz. The deconstructive approach to "If I Only Had a Brain" aired by his quartet Monday at System M turned the quaint, little ditty from "The Wizard of Oz" into a declaration of freedom, one that went on for nearly 20 minutes. Sellers, along with fellow trombonist Michael Vlatkovich (who was leading his quintet this same night at Santa Monica's Alligator Lounge), is constructing a new role for his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trombonist Joey Sellers is ready to dismantle jazz. The deconstructive approach to "If I Only Had a Brain" aired by his quartet Monday at System M turned the quaint, little ditty from "The Wizard of Oz" into a declaration of freedom, one that went on for nearly 20 minutes. Sellers, along with fellow trombonist Michael Vlatkovich (who was leading his quintet this same night at Santa Monica's Alligator Lounge), is constructing a new role for his instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1996 | Bill Kohlhasse and Albums are rated on a scale of one star (poor), two stars (fair), three stars (good) and four stars (excellent).
They're not necessarily easy to find. But these small-label albums from Southern California-based jazz musicians can be every bit as rewarding as the well-publicized releases from Verve, Blue Note or the other major labels. These recordings have shared characteristics that mirror, in mood and tempo, the tenor of our contemporary California culture, belying the once accepted "cool-school" cliche of West Coast jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Most jazz composers would love to have the opportunity to write for the ensemble that saxophonist Kim Richmond brought to the Jazz Bakery on Monday. The 22-piece group, filled with some of the Southland's most versatile musicians, augmented the usual big band instrumentation (four trumpets, four trombones, five saxophones and rhythm) with an additional pair of French horns, tuba, a percussionist and a mallet player.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Big rehearsal bands--despite their utter inability to support themselves financially--continue to proliferate around town. Joey Sellers' 13-piece Jazz Aggregation, yet another in the long list, showed up for a one-nighter Monday at Westwood's Bon Appetit. To his credit, trombonist-composer Sellers seems to be trying something a bit unusual with his ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Offering sumptuous blends of brass and reeds, angular melodies, pop-sounding passages and unexpected sounds that all but snuck up from behind, Kim Richmond put his musical mind on display when he led his 21-piece jazz orchestra Wednesday at El Matador. One might expect an ensemble that has a French horn, tuba, four trombones and five saxes--together with five trumpets and a five-member rhythm section--to wallow in its darker-toned areas and sort of lumber along.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1990 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some people just don't know what they're missing. That was certainly true Sunday evening at the Studio Cafe as drummer Wally Stryk's trio, Flight, played to a small, chatty, largely inattentive crowd. What those in attendance chose to ignore was a smooth performance of well-chosen standards, done with taste and a bit of flash.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1991 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is it going to take for Joey Sellers to get the recognition he so richly deserves? The gifted trombonist-composer brought his 11-piece Jazz Aggregation to the pleasant ambience of Huntington Beach's El Matador on Wednesday night for one of its too-rare engagements. And, as it almost always does, the group played a sizzling program before an enthusiastic but somewhat less-than-capacity crowd.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 1992 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It seems that there are two types of big bands these days: those that work in the tradition of Count Basie, Woody Herman, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman or any of the other great band masters, and those that work from that tradition, using it as a jumping-off point to explore new melodic, rhythmic and harmonic territory, just as Basie, Herman, Ellington, et al, all did in their day. Guitarist-composer Bruce Lofgren's Jazz Orchestra is in the second camp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1991 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The catalogue of the Savoy jazz label, which contains thousands of classic performances, many by Charlie Parker, Dexter Gordon, J. J. Johnson and Miles Davis, has been sold by New York-based S. J. Records to Nippon Columbia of Japan. The recently completed sale marks the first time a U.S. strictly jazz label has been acquired by a Japanese firm. "It all happened very quickly, within a month," said Barney Fields, a spokesman for Muse Records, of which S. J. Records was a subsidiary.
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