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Joey Torres

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November 1, 1987 | Associated Press
The Joey Torres story is not a pretty one. Instead of wearing the title belt of a boxing world champion, he's in Nevada State Prison serving a 25 years-to-life sentence for murder. Eight years ago, Torres had two AAU championships--in the lightweight and welterweight divisions--and unlimited potential. Then he pleaded guilty to the murder of his manager. He's been in prison ever since, but his attorney says that under the plea bargain deal made at the time, he should be a free man by now.
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SPORTS
March 21, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
The letters arrive every two weeks or so, a return address of North Kern State Prison. The handwriting shows great care, serifs and small flourishes, even if some of the words are misspelled. There is a quote from John F. Kennedy: "A man does what he must -- in spite of personal consequences, in spite of all obstacles and dangers and preasures -- and that is the basis of all human morality.... Each man must decide for himself the course he must follow....
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SPORTS
April 28, 2002 | Tim Dermody
Light-heavyweight contender Julio Gonzalez stopped Joseph Kiwanuka after seven rounds on a technical knockout Saturday night in front of 5,049 at Arrowhead Pond. Kiwanuka (27-5-2), a Uganda native now living in Las Vegas, endured a flurry of punches that left him profusely bleeding. Doctors declared Kiwanuka unfit to come out for the eighth round.
SPORTS
March 18, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
A former light-heavyweight boxer and convicted murderer at the heart of a federal boxing investigation has offered new details about what he claims was a fixed fight in the Arrowhead Pond in 2002. In a letter written from his prison cell and dated March 3, Joey Torres claimed he was assured well in advance that his opponent that night, Perry Williams, would take a dive and that they rehearsed the knockout punch.
SPORTS
March 18, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
A former light-heavyweight boxer and convicted murderer at the heart of a federal boxing investigation has offered new details about what he claims was a fixed fight in the Arrowhead Pond in 2002. In a letter written from his prison cell and dated March 3, Joey Torres claimed he was assured well in advance that his opponent that night, Perry Williams, would take a dive and that they rehearsed the knockout punch.
SPORTS
January 15, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
A convicted murderer and onetime light-heavyweight boxer has emerged as a key figure in the federal investigation looking into whether executives working for a major promoter fixed prizefights. The former boxer, Joey Torres, used his connections to vouch for a law enforcement agent posing as his cousin, a prosecutor said Wednesday.
SPORTS
March 21, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
The letters arrive every two weeks or so, a return address of North Kern State Prison. The handwriting shows great care, serifs and small flourishes, even if some of the words are misspelled. There is a quote from John F. Kennedy: "A man does what he must -- in spite of personal consequences, in spite of all obstacles and dangers and preasures -- and that is the basis of all human morality.... Each man must decide for himself the course he must follow....
SPORTS
April 27, 2002 | Paul Gutierrez
Light heavyweight Julio Gonzalez of Huntington Beach will face Joseph Kiwanuka of Uganda in a scheduled 10-round bout that is the main event of tonight's Fight Night Live at the Arrowhead Pond. Gonzalez (28-1, 18 knockouts) went the distance last summer against Roy Jones Jr. and is ranked No. 6 by the World Boxing Council. Kiwanuka (27-4-2, 20 KOs) is a former North American Boxing Federation champion.
SPORTS
March 1, 2002 | Paul Gutierrez
Top Rank, Inc., KCAL 9 and the Arrowhead Pond have joined to create a new boxing series at the arena that will present four cards a year to be shown live on television. It's not by accident that Top Rank chose Julio Gonzalez of Huntington Beach to headline the first card on April 27, or that Top Rank chose Orange County as its home for the series, what with its burgeoning Latino community. "It's worthwhile for us to do these shows in this area," Top Rank Chairman Bob Arum said.
SPORTS
January 10, 2004 | Steve Springer, Times Staff Writer
The target of a joint FBI-New York City Police Department boxing investigation is promoter Bob Arum's Top Rank organization, not last September's Oscar De La Hoya-Shane Mosley super-welterweight title fight, according to a knowledgeable law enforcement source. FBI agents raided Arum's Las Vegas office Tuesday, seizing computers, medical records, fight tapes, contracts and other financial documents.
SPORTS
January 15, 2004 | David Wharton, Times Staff Writer
A convicted murderer and onetime light-heavyweight boxer has emerged as a key figure in the federal investigation looking into whether executives working for a major promoter fixed prizefights. The former boxer, Joey Torres, used his connections to vouch for a law enforcement agent posing as his cousin, a prosecutor said Wednesday.
SPORTS
April 28, 2002 | Tim Dermody
Light-heavyweight contender Julio Gonzalez stopped Joseph Kiwanuka after seven rounds on a technical knockout Saturday night in front of 5,049 at Arrowhead Pond. Kiwanuka (27-5-2), a Uganda native now living in Las Vegas, endured a flurry of punches that left him profusely bleeding. Doctors declared Kiwanuka unfit to come out for the eighth round.
SPORTS
November 1, 1987 | Associated Press
The Joey Torres story is not a pretty one. Instead of wearing the title belt of a boxing world champion, he's in Nevada State Prison serving a 25 years-to-life sentence for murder. Eight years ago, Torres had two AAU championships--in the lightweight and welterweight divisions--and unlimited potential. Then he pleaded guilty to the murder of his manager. He's been in prison ever since, but his attorney says that under the plea bargain deal made at the time, he should be a free man by now.
SPORTS
June 27, 2006 | Steve Springer and Greg Krikorian, Times Staff Writers
After a 20-month FBI sting operation, a raid of the Top Rank Boxing Organization offices in Las Vegas and a subsequent investigation that lasted nearly 2 1/2 years, federal law enforcement officials have dropped the probe of promoter Bob Arum's operation without handing down any indictments. "I'm gratified, ecstatic," Arum said. "I understand that the government has to investigate when there are allegations, but I knew from the get-go that we had done nothing wrong.
SPORTS
January 17, 2004 | Greg Krikorian and Steve Springer, Times Staff Writers
The FBI and an undercover New York City police detective opened a bogus Las Vegas business more than a year ago as a front to infiltrate the boxing world, according to documents and interviews. Nevada business records show that a company called YGJ & Co. was established Dec. 4, 2002, as part of a wide-ranging federal investigation into whether professional prizefights were fixed by anyone associated with the promotion of the fight.
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