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October 22, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
An inveterate story teller, Johana Harris-Heggie nevertheless seems to avoid reminiscing--she lives and laughs in the present. But Roy Harris' widow, now remarried, can sometimes be persuaded to look back. The other afternoon, for instance, at the end of a long day of teaching at UCLA, the veteran pianist, who will be 76 in January, seemed in the mood for short forays into the past.
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October 22, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
An inveterate story teller, Johana Harris-Heggie nevertheless seems to avoid reminiscing--she lives and laughs in the present. But Roy Harris' widow, now remarried, can sometimes be persuaded to look back. The other afternoon, for instance, at the end of a long day of teaching at UCLA, the veteran pianist, who will be 76 in January, seemed in the mood for short forays into the past.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES
Two laudable purposes are fulfilled by the Mexican Arts Chamber Symphony, which for the past two years has been formed at UCLA around Cinco de Mayo festivities. First, the orchestra gives sympathetic attention to perhaps unjustly neglected repertory by Spanish, Mexican and Hispanic composers. Second, it gives UCLA music students an opportunity to play alongside the professionals.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1985 | DANIEL CARIAGA
An ad-hoc trio made up of violinist Yukiko Kamei, violist Milton Thomas and pianist Johana Harris-Heggie gave a satisfying, if not always focused, performance, Friday night in Hancock Auditorium at USC. The fact that the players never performed together as a threesome was one disappointment in this evening.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
The third event in the "Retrospective" at UCLA was held on Monday and was really two concerts separated by an intermission. On the first portion were six rather conventional chamber works. The second part was devoted to works played by the UCLA Contemporary Gamelan Ensemble. American composers writing for Gamelan have usually attempted to combine elements of Western music with those of Indonesian music, with varying degrees of success.
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February 20, 1985 | JOHN HENKEN
Nadia Boulanger was that most improbable sort of musical legend--a teacher. She composed in her early years and established a modest career as a performer and conductor. But it is in the numbers, diversity and prominence of her students that her reputation lives. Monday evening in the Japan America Theatre, the Los Angeles Philharmonic New Music Group presented a motley program of music by some of her American pupils.
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November 10, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
There may not be a more popular living American composer than Aaron Copland (who turns 85 on Thursday). Audiences never seem to tire of his splashy, tuneful orchestral pieces. Which leads Ursula Oppens to ask of his Piano Concerto, "Why isn't it performed more?" The New York-based pianist, who will play the work at concerts by Erich Leinsdorf and the Los Angeles Philharmonic at the Music Center beginning on Copland's birthday, can barely contain herself in singing its praises.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1989 | TERRY McQUILKIN
Arkansas-based pianist Alan Chow captured top honors in the UCLA Piano Competition, which concluded Sunday at Royce Hall. The $10,000 Sascha Gorodnitzki Prize was presented to Chow by Virginia Gorodnitzki, wife of the late pianist and pedagogue, in a ceremony after the final round of competition in which the three finalists each performed a complete concerto. In addition to the cash award, Chow won an opportunity to perform at Merkin Hall in New York and UCLA during the 1990-91 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
The New Music L.A. 1987 festival seems to mean many things to many people. Perhaps too many things. Perhaps too many people. At one extreme, the ballyhooed series embraces fancy, grandiose concerts dominated by such avant-gardish superstars as Pierre Boulez and John Cage. At the other extreme, it lends surface validation to would-bes, has-beens, nonentities and dilettantes. If music is new, it must be worth hearing. Or so the optimistic management would have us believe.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 1988 | JOHN HENKEN
Singing the vocal solos in Mahler's Third Symphony this evening with the American Youth Symphony is a pivotal event for Gail Dubinbaum. Professionally, it caps a season in which the 32-year-old mezzo has emphasized song recitals and orchestral concerts for the first time, rather than opera. It will also be Dubinbaum's last performance until October. Following the concert, she will return to Phoenix to await the birth of her first child.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 1985 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Time Music/Dance Critic
The ads promised an 8 o'clock curtain. The tickets said 8:30. The orgy of self-congratulatory speeches involving politicos and benefactors began just before 9. The curtain finally rose on a full, four-part dance program at 9:15. It was that sort of a night. Luckily, most of the dressy, rose-toting audience didn't seem to care. The revelers had come to participate in an Event.
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