Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJohann Sebastian Bach
IN THE NEWS

Johann Sebastian Bach

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A modern reconstruction of Johann Sebastian Bach's head -- using state-of-the-art computer modeling techniques -- shows the composer as a strong-jawed man with a slight underbite, his large head topped with short, silver hair. The bust, unveiled in Berlin on Monday, was created by anthropologist Caroline Wilkinson in her lab at the University of Dundee in Scotland. Rather than use Bach's actual bones, which are buried at the St. John's Church in Leipzig, Wilkinson worked from a copper replica of Bach's skull made for a previous reconstruction in 1894, done nearly 150 years after his death by a physician and a sculptor.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Ginell is a freelance writer.
The Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra opened its fourth season under its music director, Martin Haselbock, at Zipper Hall on Saturday night in fine shape, juxtaposing a clutch of famous baroque-era composers with two lesser-known ones. The unwary reader of Musica Angelica's season brochure might have thought that the listing of Orchestral Suite No. 4 in D by J.B. Bach contained an unfortunate typo. But no, this wasn't the familiar Suite No. 4 -- also in D -- by good old Johann Sebastian Bach.
Advertisement
WORLD
June 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A previously unknown work by Johann Sebastian Bach has been discovered in a crate of 18th century birthday cards, researchers said in Germany. They said the aria for soprano and string or keyboard accompaniment composed for a duke's birthday in 1713 is the first music from the renowned composer to surface in three decades. Michael Maul of the Bach Archive Foundation found the composition last month in the eastern city of Weimar. The foundation said Bach wrote the two-page score at age 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2008 | From the Associated Press
A modern reconstruction of Johann Sebastian Bach's head -- using state-of-the-art computer modeling techniques -- shows the composer as a strong-jawed man with a slight underbite, his large head topped with short, silver hair. The bust, unveiled in Berlin on Monday, was created by anthropologist Caroline Wilkinson in her lab at the University of Dundee in Scotland. Rather than use Bach's actual bones, which are buried at the St. John's Church in Leipzig, Wilkinson worked from a copper replica of Bach's skull made for a previous reconstruction in 1894, done nearly 150 years after his death by a physician and a sculptor.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Part of a lost composition by Johann Sebastian Bach has been found in Japan about 80 years after it went missing, a Japanese music professor says. Eight pages of a 1728 wedding cantata by the German baroque master recently were found among the possessions of the late Japanese classical pianist Chieko Hara, said Tadashi Isoyama, a professor at the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The oldest known manuscripts of Johann Sebastian Bach -- handwritten copies of works by two other composers -- have been discovered in a German library that was heavily damaged in a fire two years ago, researchers said Thursday. The two manuscripts date from around 1700 and contain copies Bach made of organ music composed by Dietrich Buxtehude and Johann Adam Reincken, said Hellmut Seemann, president of the Foundation of Weimar Classics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1999 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Johann Sebastian Bach composed for most musical genres in vogue during his lifetime. But he never wrote an opera. At St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Sunday, the William Hall Master Chorale presented Bach's "The Passion According to St. John" in a way that came as close to filling that gap as possible without staging the piece as an opera. Conductor William Hall used a large chorus, included soloists with meaty voices and balanced them with a small orchestra of period and modern instruments.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2008 | Richard S. Ginell, Ginell is a freelance writer.
The Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra opened its fourth season under its music director, Martin Haselbock, at Zipper Hall on Saturday night in fine shape, juxtaposing a clutch of famous baroque-era composers with two lesser-known ones. The unwary reader of Musica Angelica's season brochure might have thought that the listing of Orchestral Suite No. 4 in D by J.B. Bach contained an unfortunate typo. But no, this wasn't the familiar Suite No. 4 -- also in D -- by good old Johann Sebastian Bach.
NEWS
January 25, 1985 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Police Capt. Penny E. Harrington was promoted to chief of police of Portland, Ore., making her the first woman in the nation to lead a big-city police force. Mayor Bud Clark said he chose Harrington over three other finalists because of "the long-term period she's had in the trenches." Harrington, 42, joined the Portland Police Bureau in 1964 and worked her way up through the ranks.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2006 | From the Associated Press
The oldest known manuscripts of Johann Sebastian Bach -- handwritten copies of works by two other composers -- have been discovered in a German library that was heavily damaged in a fire two years ago, researchers said Thursday. The two manuscripts date from around 1700 and contain copies Bach made of organ music composed by Dietrich Buxtehude and Johann Adam Reincken, said Hellmut Seemann, president of the Foundation of Weimar Classics.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2006 | Chris Pasles
WERE Bach's famous cello suites and other works really written by his second wife, Anna Magdalena? That's what Martin Jarvis, a professor at the Charles Darwin University school of music in Darwin, Australia, believes. Using police forensic science techniques and some internal musical evidence, Jarvis claims that Anna Magdalena was the composer of the six suites, not merely the copyist, as traditionally believed.
WORLD
June 9, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
A previously unknown work by Johann Sebastian Bach has been discovered in a crate of 18th century birthday cards, researchers said in Germany. They said the aria for soprano and string or keyboard accompaniment composed for a duke's birthday in 1713 is the first music from the renowned composer to surface in three decades. Michael Maul of the Bach Archive Foundation found the composition last month in the eastern city of Weimar. The foundation said Bach wrote the two-page score at age 28.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2004 | From Associated Press
Part of a lost composition by Johann Sebastian Bach has been found in Japan about 80 years after it went missing, a Japanese music professor says. Eight pages of a 1728 wedding cantata by the German baroque master recently were found among the possessions of the late Japanese classical pianist Chieko Hara, said Tadashi Isoyama, a professor at the Kunitachi College of Music in Tokyo.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2000 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
In 1971, Leonard Bernstein, a Jew, wrote a Catholic mass of sorts. An audacious theatrical interpretation of the liturgy that was commissioned in memory of JFK to open the Kennedy Center in Washington, "Mass" is an impudent stylistic brew that combines rock, 12-tone music and Broadway. At its center is a hippie celebrant who confronts God and society; on its edges are provocative excursions into Buddhism and Judaism. The Kennedys were aghast; Nixon, who was president at the time, stayed home.
BOOKS
April 9, 2000 | TED LIBBEY, Ted Libbey is the author of "The NPR Guide to Building a Classical CD Collection" and the "NPR Encyclopedia of Classical Music." He is heard every week on National Public Radio's "Performance Today."
"Bach?" a fellow German composer by the name of Beethoven once snorted, preparing to land a pun on the meaning of the word Bach ("brook") in German. "Not Brook, but Ocean, should be his name!" Since the 1780s, just about every professional musician of any stature has had something similar to say.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 1990 | GREGG WAGER
The big guns were wheeled out for the finale of the Corona del Mar Baroque Festival Sunday night at St. Michael and All Angels Church. Artistic director Burton Karson led the full Festival Orchestra and Chorus in four lesser-known works by the best-known composer of the Baroque era, Johann Sebastian Bach. The 22-piece orchestra and 27-voice chorus blended with the most pleasing results in the final work on the program, Cantata No. 172, "Erschallet, ihr Lieder."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1989 | SUVAN GEER
The Huntington Art Gallery's current exhibition, "British Portrait Drawings of Notables," takes as its central theme the famous historic individuals in European literature, the arts and politics. It offers a modest but often delightful look at writers and poets such as Charles Dickens and Elizabeth Barrett Browning and such memorable figures as politician William Gladstone and adventurer Captain Blood. Culled by curator Shelley M. Bennett from the Huntington's collection of more than 13,000 drawings and watercolors, the exhibit features some of the most famous countenances in European history, from Napoleon to Johann Sebastian Bach.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1999 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Johann Sebastian Bach composed for most musical genres in vogue during his lifetime. But he never wrote an opera. At St. Andrews Presbyterian Church on Sunday, the William Hall Master Chorale presented Bach's "The Passion According to St. John" in a way that came as close to filling that gap as possible without staging the piece as an opera. Conductor William Hall used a large chorus, included soloists with meaty voices and balanced them with a small orchestra of period and modern instruments.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|