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Johannes Vermeer

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Guards accompany them when they travel. Crowds flock to them when they arrive. Johannes Vermeer's exquisite paintings of young women in gleaming domestic settings are the vigilantly watched and amply insured celebrities of the museum world, promising not only a glimpse of extraordinary beauty but big crowds as well. Now two of Vermeer's luminous women are making rare appearances in California. PHOTOS: Arts & culture by The Times "Girl With a Pearl Earring" from 1665, a popular painting even before the Tracy Chevalier novel and Scarlett Johansson movie of the same name, went on display last month at the De Young Museum in San Francisco.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
The subject of the documentary "Tim's Vermeer" isn't Johannes Vermeer, the 17th century Dutch artist renowned for his luminescent paintings. The true protagonist of the movie is Tim -- Tim Jenison, that is -- an unassuming computer engineer from Texas who embarks on a journey to upend the way we think about Vermeer and his masterpieces. Jenison believes the Dutch artist used a clever contraption of mirrors to aid in the creation of his paintings. Jenison's attempt to replicate Vermeer's "The Music Lesson" using such a device forms the backbone of the documentary, which opened in December for an awards-qualifying run and is back in cinemas starting Friday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you missed the very fine, fine-art documentary "Tim's Vermeer" during its brief stop last month, it is back in town for its official run. Director Teller (better known as the droller half of the ironic comedy/magic team Penn & Teller) follows inventor Tim Jenison's journey to understand how the 17th-century painter Johannes Vermeer tripped the light so fantastically. A tale of art and obsession unfolds as Jenison experiments with various optical techniques Vermeer might have used to achieve his luminous interplay of light and shadow.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey
If you missed the very fine, fine-art documentary "Tim's Vermeer" during its brief stop last month, it is back in town for its official run. Director Teller (better known as the droller half of the ironic comedy/magic team Penn & Teller) follows inventor Tim Jenison's journey to understand how the 17th-century painter Johannes Vermeer tripped the light so fantastically. A tale of art and obsession unfolds as Jenison experiments with various optical techniques Vermeer might have used to achieve his luminous interplay of light and shadow.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
"Young Woman Seated at the Virginals" -- a tiny painting by 17th century Dutch master Johannes Vermeer that an anonymous bidder bought for $30 million in July at a London auction -- has resurfaced at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But the identity of the owner remains a mystery. The museum will say only that the painting is on loan from a private collector. Las Vegas casino mogul Steve Wynn, whose name has been bandied about in the press as the most likely buyer, isn't talking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
If an early painting by Pablo Picasso, who churned out thousands of works during his long life, is worth more than $100 million, how can one of the mere 36 paintings known to have been made by Johannes Vermeer be valued at only $5 million? That's the question for auction watchers as they ponder Sotheby's May 5 sale of Picasso's "Boy With a Pipe" and look forward to the firm's July 7 auction in London of Vermeer's "Young Woman Seated at the Virginals."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1996 | PETER HERMANN, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The inn where Johannes Vermeer was born is long gone, the building replaced by one now with a shuttered computer store. His house and studio were demolished more than a century ago. But Vermeer, the 17th century master, still inhabits the town, much as the town will forever inhabit his work. In Vermeer's "View From Delft," one of his most famous works, the town's orange tile roofs sparkle in the sun; they still do. The harbor could be mistaken for open sea; it still can.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A painting by Johannes Vermeer, the 17th century Dutch master whose luminous domestic scenes are cherished by connoisseurs and the wider public alike, is coming to the Norton Simon Museum. "A Lady Writing," a signature image of a young woman seated at a desk, will be lent to the museum by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., as part of an exchange program launched last spring with the Simon's loan of a Rembrandt. The Vermeer will be on view in Pasadena from Nov. 7 to Feb. 2, 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2013 | By John Horn
TELLURIDE, Colo. -- Tim Jenison makes it very clear in the beginning of the Telluride Film Festival documentary “Tim's Vermeer” that he is not an artist. He's a desktop-video inventor, the founder of a hardware and software company called NewTek. But Jenison is as fascinated by art as he is by technology, and not that long ago he began to wonder if modern machinery in its more nascent forms might have been employed by painters centuries ago. PHOTOS: Fall movie sneaks 2013 So he began an experiment that at first seemed both inspired and insane: to use rudimentary devices to paint the 17 th century masterpiece “The Music Lesson” by Johannes Vermeer just as he imagined the Dutch artist had. “At the face of it that seems almost impossible,” Jenison says of his painting plans in “Tim's Vermeer, “ which is having its world premiere in Telluride.  “Because I am not a painter.” The film, directed by the magician Teller in his feature-film debut, is a fascinating exploration of how Vermeer might have used lenses and mirrors to master the representation of light and perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By David Ng
The subject of the documentary "Tim's Vermeer" isn't Johannes Vermeer, the 17th century Dutch artist renowned for his luminescent paintings. The true protagonist of the movie is Tim -- Tim Jenison, that is -- an unassuming computer engineer from Texas who embarks on a journey to upend the way we think about Vermeer and his masterpieces. Jenison believes the Dutch artist used a clever contraption of mirrors to aid in the creation of his paintings. Jenison's attempt to replicate Vermeer's "The Music Lesson" using such a device forms the backbone of the documentary, which opened in December for an awards-qualifying run and is back in cinemas starting Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- When the popular magician and entertainer Penn Jillette walked into the offices of Hollywood executives several years ago to pitch a documentary about the Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer, he was met with skepticism. After all, Jillette and his partner Teller were known for their cheeky stage act and television work, such as “Penn & Teller: Bull - ,” which aired for many years on Showtime. Surely this was a gag? “They thought I was doing some 'Borat' act on them,” Jillette said at the New York Film Festival on Thursday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2013 | By John Horn
TELLURIDE, Colo. -- Tim Jenison makes it very clear in the beginning of the Telluride Film Festival documentary “Tim's Vermeer” that he is not an artist. He's a desktop-video inventor, the founder of a hardware and software company called NewTek. But Jenison is as fascinated by art as he is by technology, and not that long ago he began to wonder if modern machinery in its more nascent forms might have been employed by painters centuries ago. PHOTOS: Fall movie sneaks 2013 So he began an experiment that at first seemed both inspired and insane: to use rudimentary devices to paint the 17 th century masterpiece “The Music Lesson” by Johannes Vermeer just as he imagined the Dutch artist had. “At the face of it that seems almost impossible,” Jenison says of his painting plans in “Tim's Vermeer, “ which is having its world premiere in Telluride.  “Because I am not a painter.” The film, directed by the magician Teller in his feature-film debut, is a fascinating exploration of how Vermeer might have used lenses and mirrors to master the representation of light and perspective.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2013 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Guards accompany them when they travel. Crowds flock to them when they arrive. Johannes Vermeer's exquisite paintings of young women in gleaming domestic settings are the vigilantly watched and amply insured celebrities of the museum world, promising not only a glimpse of extraordinary beauty but big crowds as well. Now two of Vermeer's luminous women are making rare appearances in California. PHOTOS: Arts & culture by The Times "Girl With a Pearl Earring" from 1665, a popular painting even before the Tracy Chevalier novel and Scarlett Johansson movie of the same name, went on display last month at the De Young Museum in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In 1995, when the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., rounded up 21 of the 35 paintings known to have been made by 17th century Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer, the show was billed as a once-in-a-lifetime event. About 4,000 people filed into the specially ticketed exhibition each day -- until a partial government shutdown, caused by a budget disagreement between President Bill Clinton and the Republican majority in Congress, forced the gallery to close.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2008 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
When IT comes to forgery and its ability to fascinate, the bigger the better, and the greater the audacity the more compelling. In the story of a two-bit Dutch painter, Han Van Meegeren, who had the nerve to take on that most rarefied of his artistic compatriots, Johannes Vermeer, author Edward Dolnick has hit the mother lode. And as if this tale of unparalleled chutzpah were not good enough, it takes place amid the tumult of the Nazi occupation of Holland and the competitive plunder of its -- and much of Europe's -- art treasures by Adolf Hitler and Hermann Goering.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 29, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A painting by Johannes Vermeer, the 17th century Dutch master whose luminous domestic scenes are cherished by connoisseurs and the wider public alike, is coming to the Norton Simon Museum. "A Lady Writing," a signature image of a young woman seated at a desk, will be lent to the museum by the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., as part of an exchange program launched last spring with the Simon's loan of a Rembrandt. The Vermeer will be on view in Pasadena from Nov. 7 to Feb. 2, 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2008 | Suzanne Muchnic
In 1995, when the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., rounded up 21 of the 35 paintings known to have been made by 17th century Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer, the show was billed as a once-in-a-lifetime event. About 4,000 people filed into the specially ticketed exhibition each day -- until a partial government shutdown, caused by a budget disagreement between President Bill Clinton and the Republican majority in Congress, forced the gallery to close.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Around 1656 or 1657, the young Dutch artist Johannes Vermeer decided to give up history painting. Rather than depict biblical and mythological scenes as moral guideposts, a category of painting then held in the highest esteem in artistic circles, he decided to concentrate instead on more intimate scenes of contemporary life in Delft, the picturesque town where he lived his entire life.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
"Young Woman Seated at the Virginals" -- a tiny painting by 17th century Dutch master Johannes Vermeer that an anonymous bidder bought for $30 million in July at a London auction -- has resurfaced at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. But the identity of the owner remains a mystery. The museum will say only that the painting is on loan from a private collector. Las Vegas casino mogul Steve Wynn, whose name has been bandied about in the press as the most likely buyer, isn't talking.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2004 | Suzanne Muchnic
If an early painting by Pablo Picasso, who churned out thousands of works during his long life, is worth more than $100 million, how can one of the mere 36 paintings known to have been made by Johannes Vermeer be valued at only $5 million? That's the question for auction watchers as they ponder Sotheby's May 5 sale of Picasso's "Boy With a Pipe" and look forward to the firm's July 7 auction in London of Vermeer's "Young Woman Seated at the Virginals."
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